Guru

first_img Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos. This week’s guruStretching credibility to support knicker claimA study highlighting some truly outrageous expenses claims by staff shockedeven Guru, who is renowned for his imaginative approach to reimbursing himselffor business-related costs. The survey for Buzz airline reveals employees have made claims for itemssuch as camel rides, hot air balloon trips, a 100 bottles of Irish whisky andÉsupport knickers. One surreal member of staff raised eyebrows at his head office by putting ina claim for ‘hiring a turkey that could be trained to walk on a lead’. Guru blushed when he read about some of the seedier business entertainmentclaims, such as visits to lapdancing clubs and pay-per-view porn TV channels inhotels. But he applauded one like-minded soul, who defended his claim for a £120bottle of wine by arguing that his French let him down when ordering a meal inMarseilles. Cash bonuses offered to cops who pass the liquor sales testReforms to policing in the UK announced this year include proposals tomodernise work practices and the reward system – including performance-relatedpay. So far it has not been revealed exactly how performance will be assessed andrewarded. Guru suggests the Home Secretary considers following the Indian model, wherebobbies receive cash bonuses if liquor sales increase on their patch. Thescheme is aimed at reducing the consumption of cheap illicit bootleg liquorfrom unlicensed stores. Authorities claim the initiative will only increase the efficiency of theofficers. State Excise minister Anil Deshmukh said: “It’s funny, but true.Increases in liquor sales are being treated as a barometer to check theperformance of our staff.” Power men are big in bedroom deptWomen find senior managers and company directors are better in bed than morelowly staff members, according to a new study. A survey of hundreds of Italian women reveals that two-thirds found greatersexual satisfaction from “powerful men in socially respectedpositions”. The Institute for Interdisciplinary Psychology, which conducted the study,surveyed women aged between 25 and 55. A spokesman for the institute said thereason why women find men in power a better bet in the sack is because theybring them a sense of security. A rather embittered Guru had always naively thought the reason women tend tobe attracted to men in power is more closely linked to the contents of theirwallets than any feelings of security. Direct approach to recruit staff may not workGuru has always welcomed innovative approaches to recruitment so he wasimpressed by the way in which one telesales boss in Bury, Greater Manchester,found her new staff. She distributed leaflets detailing vacancies in hercompany, while standing outside the town’s Job Centre.Unfortunately, the Job Centre manager was not so impressed byher initiative and told her to move on because she was ‘poaching’ theunemployed. GuruOn 24 Sep 2002 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. last_img read more

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Commentary: Andrew Luck Walks Away While He Still Can

first_imgCommentary: Andrew Luck Walks Away While He Still CanAugust 25, 2019 By John KrullTheStatehouseFile.com INDIANAPOLIS – Maybe Andrew Luck quit because his head is on straight.The Indianapolis Colts quarterback’s retirement announcement caught everyone by surprise. It also prompted some people who should have known better to start criticizing a young man for trying to make the wisest choices with his life.I’ve known former NFL players.Some are fortunate. Even as they advance into middle-age or even old age, they still move with the grace and assurance of the superb athletes they once were. Time might have slowed them a step or two and added a few lines to their faces, but their years on the field didn’t seem to have left permanent marks on them.Things didn’t go so well for others.One guy I know is still in his 40s, but he moves with the gimpy stride of a man in his late 80s. Every step seems to cost him something.Another former NFL player used to work out at the same place I did. He’d break into a sweat climbing a flight of stairs because it hurt so much to drag himself up them. His joints had taken such a pounding th toat almost everything caused him pain.I should mention that neither of these guys is asking for sympathy. They played because they loved the game and because they were well paid for doing so. They made their choices and they’re living with the consequences of those choices.But the choices were their choices.Not the crowd’s choices.Not the choices of some blowhard on a barstool or in sports talk show sound booth.But the fact that these former players accept responsibility for the consequences of their career choices shouldn’t blind us to the fact that there were consequences.Years ago, during my newspaper days, I spent some Sunday afternoons on the sidelines at NFL games.Being up in the stands or even in a press box distances one from the action. Up close to and at the same level as the play it’s impossible to miss the sheer and incredible violence of an NFL game.The players are huge, and they move faster than anything that big ought to be able to run. The hits can be horrific, like cars smashing into each other.In fact, down at field level, an NFL game resembles a demolition derby, only with human bone, muscle and sinew being crunched and mashed rather than automotive metal.It’s not a surprise that, at every game, several players either limp off or are carried off the field.It’s also not a surprise that some of them never walk or move right again after being carried off.I’ve never met Andrew Luck, but he’s always struck me as a thoughtful young man.He’s gracious and self-deprecating in public. He shares the credit when the team succeeds and shoulders more than his portion of the blame when things don’t go well.Even after he began to amass wealth on a grand scale, he still maintained a relatively modest lifestyle, driving an old car and even using an out-of-date flip phone for years after he’d hit the big time. He devoted large portions of his time and energy to charity and other good causes.Luck’s anguish was palpable at the improvised Saturday night press conference announcing his retirement. He’d been booed as word leaked out at the Colts exhibition game that evening.He said that stung.Colts owner Jim Irsay said Luck could be leaving as much as $500 million on the table by quitting now.But it wasn’t the money Luck talked about. He talked about his love for the game and for his teammates.As always, a thoughtful young man.But he also said he’d been in pain for much of the past four years and that he had to think about what he wanted his life to be like after his football days were over.To all but the most boneheaded, it was clear he was making a tough choice.Andrew Luck is walking away from a game he loves while he still is certain he will be able to walk.That’s his right and his choice, a choice everyone ought to respect.FOOTNOTE: John Krull is the director of Franklin College’s Pulliam School of Journalism and publisher of TheStatehouseFile.com, a news website powered by Franklin College journalism students.Print Friendly, PDF & EmailFacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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Radil, Ballance key Bengals playoff win

first_imgHardened by a long 2016 JCC of Bayonne Sr. Division Indoor Flag Football campaign, the (0-11) Eagles put all their trials and tribulations behind them as they set their sights on a playoff win versus the (6-5) Bengals. Giving the Bengals all they could handle for most of the game, the Eagles found themselves trailing by just two points at 38-36 with just five minutes left to play. As the Bengals relied heavily on Drew Radil who accounted for 4 TDs and 8 expts with Anthony Baez pitching in on a 10 yard TD catch the Eagles put their faith in the hands of David Matos(5 TDs, 2 expts), Mariam Rasslan (2 expts), and Ezekiel Lupianes (2 expts) with Jack Kruchkowski at the QB helm. As both squads geared up for the home stretch, the Bengals’ QB Chris Ballance caught fire hitting Radil on a TD and two point dart making it 46-36, Bengals. Hoping to catch the Bengals’ defense napping, the Eagles tried a quick count run but the move back fired as the Eagles’ runner couldn’t get out of the endzone resulting in a safety and a 48-36 Bengals’ advantage. Holding a twelve point lead, the Bengals put their victory into the lock box as Mike Piscopos printed to paydirt for a 54-36 win.last_img read more

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Workshops for Rebuild by Design project to take place in Hoboken

first_img× HOBOKEN –The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) and engineering firm AECOM will host a series of design workshops in May and June to solicit feedback on the Rebuild by Design Hudson River project, a federal project to relieve flooding in the area.The project will help protect Hoboken in times of extreme weather events from flooding using infrastructures like floodwalls, seawalls, and soft landscaping such as berms and levees. These items could appear as part of parks, rain gardens, bicycle parking, and murals, in northern and southern Hoboken.The design workshops will focus on characteristics and amenities of the project.A workshop will take place on May 30 from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. at 1600 Adams St. in the North Hudson Sewerage Authority Board Room, and another will take place the following day, May 31, from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. at the Multi-Service Center at 124 Grand St.These workshops will discuss the alignment in the north end of the project area from the border of Weehawken, through Harborside Park, to Washington Street south of Fourteenth Street.On June 6 from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. at 22 Hackensack Ave. in Weehawken (St. Lawrence RC Church) another workshop will be held to discuss the Weehawken design of the alignment as well as Harborside Park.Later workshops are expected to be scheduled for late June which will discuss the design of the alignment in Hoboken’s south near Observer Highway and the Jersey City portion of the alignment.Fliers for the workshops can be found at http://hobokennj.gov/content/wp-content/uploads/180522_DZW01-FLYER-1.pdf”.last_img read more

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Ocean City May Help Theatre Company Find a Home for $1 a Year

first_imgA city-owned property at the corner of 15th Street and West Avenue in Ocean City, NJ, could become a new home for the Greater Ocean City Theatre Company if City Council passes an ordinance to lease the property for $1 a year.City Council will vote Thursday to let the nonprofit Greater Ocean City Theatre Company use a city-owned building at 15th Street and West Avenue as a new home.Council will consider the first reading of an ordinance that would authorize a five-year lease for $1 a year. The public meeting is scheduled for 7 p.m. Dec. 4 at City Hall.“The property is a vacant building which has not been occupied by city personnel in approximately four years” and “is not currently needed for municipal use,” according to the proposed ordinance. It had been used most recently for the storage of records and city equipment.The local Ocean City Theatre Company would create a performing arts facility used to run its youth theater camps for the city, to stage rehearsals for its full calendar of productions throughout the year, and to create a base for costuming and props.The lease deal would allow the nonprofit to consolidate “four different locations on the island under one roof and to function with a little more financial stability,” according to Ocean City Theatre Company Artistic Director Michael Hartman.OCTC is funded entirely through ticket sales and donations. The company produces musicals with professional talent, and it runs a junior company that features area youth. OCTC performers are a staple of parades and events throughout the year, and OCTC runs educational programs in the local schools.The proposed lease (see Agenda Packet for the full text of the lease and ordinance) requires OCTC to accept the property “as is,” and pay for utilities, repairs and maintenance.last_img read more

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Rex Orange County Releases First New Song Since 2017, “New House” [Listen]

first_img20-year-old British singer/songwriter Rex Orange County has shared his first new song since the release of his sophomore album, Apricot Princess, back in 2017. The new song, “New House”, once again showcases the young artist’s laid-back style and unique vocal quality. The song’s lyrics also reference his absence from making new music (“You know that I haven’t been inspired since like I was 18.”)As Rex Orange County, born Alexander O’Connor, noted in a message posted to Twitter along with the new track,Hey. i want to say thank you to everyone that is here for me now and to those who are still here from before. life is weird and it seems like everyone has a difficult time in one way or another. the greatest things always seem to come with a level of confusion that makes it easy to question whether anything matters….. with that being said, i must confirm that i still love doing this and that i’m beyond grateful for all the support i’ve been shown.life is good. i’m happier today than i was for the majority of last year. Thea [sic] is my valentine….. and whether you’re in love today or not, this one is for you, from me. it’s called New House.happy valentinesRex‘New House’ out now https://t.co/nsHtuoSDkncreated & produced by Rex Orange County & Ben Baptiemixed by Ben Baptiemastered by Ted Jensenbrass section – Michael Underwood, Johnny Woodham & Patrick Hayes pic.twitter.com/crNzImFyxs— rex orange county (@rexorangecounty) February 14, 2019You can listen to Rex Orange County’s catchy new song, “New House”, below:Rex Orange County – “New House”[Video: Rex Orange County]Rex Orange County currently does not have any upcoming performance dates scheduled, but with the release of new music, you can expect more news sooner rather than later.last_img read more

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Zhiming Kuang approved for promotion to tenured full professor

first_imgHarvard President Drew Faust has approved Zhiming Kuang for promotion to the role of full professor with tenure.A climate scientist who specializes in modeling tropical convection systems, Kuang holds a joint appointment in the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences (EPS). His work investigates how tropical convection interacts with large-scale atmospheric flow, and how fluctuations in that system can bring about rainfall or drought.In 2010, he co-authored a study which challenged the conventional view that South Asian monsoons were caused by a massive release of heat from the high-altitude Tibetan Plateau. With colleagues in EPS, Kuang created a model of atmospheric circulation and demonstrated that the insulating barrier of the Himalayas is just as capable of producing a monsoon, without the influence of the plateau.The implications of that research extend to land use in South Asia and the future of the region’s water supply.Kuang also studies and simulates the El Niño Southern Oscillation with the goal of understanding both its meteorological effects and its impact on global chemistry.His work has the potential to affect the lives of billions of people worldwide.Currently an associate professor of climate science, Kuang teaches in the areas of environmental science and engineering and applied mathematics at SEAS. He is also a faculty associate of the Harvard University Center for the Environment. Read Full Storylast_img read more

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Digging for research gold in electronic medical records

first_imgFor scientists who study rare diseases, hospitals’ vast data banks hold tantalizing potential. Access to anonymized electronic medical records allows researchers to track the progress of a larger group of patients than would be possible in a traditional cohort study, at a much lower cost. If the records can be linked to blood samples that patients have consented to be used for DNA testing, symptoms can be compared to genetic markers for a richer analysis. But making sense out of such a complex sea of billing codes and physicians’ notes requires considerable biostatistical skill.Tianxi Cai, SD ’99, professor of biostatistics at Harvard School of Public Health, is working to develop a framework to help researchers use large datasets to better understand the genetic basis of complex diseases. She spoke about the promise and challenge of working with electronic medical records for the annual Myrto Lefkopoulou Distinguished Lectureship, held September 18, 2014. Even determining what key words in a patient record indicate that he or she has a particular disease can be quite difficult, Cai said. “There are 10 different ways to say coronary heart disease.”Cai and her colleagues looked for rheumatoid arthritis patients among thousands of records from Boston’s Brigham and Women’s Hospital — a painstaking process which took two years, she said. The researchers were able to improve their accuracy through the development of an algorithm that enabled them to scan for symptom keywords in physicians’ notes, in addition to using coded data such as lab reports and prescriptions. Read Full Storylast_img read more

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The Honorable Henry Cisneros and Sol Trujillo to deliver eighth annual Roosevelt Memorial Lecture

first_imgThe FDR Foundation at Adams House, Harvard College, has selected The Honorable Henry Cisneros, the former secretary of Housing and Urban Development, and Solomon D. (“Sol”) Trujillo, an entrepreneur and former global telecommunications, media and technology CEO, to deliver the eighth annual Roosevelt Memorial Lecture at Harvard University on April 8. FDR’s Good Neighbor Policy marked a new, positive approach in the United States’ policy with Latin America. Trading in the “Big Stick” for non-intervention in the internal affairs of its neighbors to the south, the Good Neighbor Policy helped build mutual trust and respect through diplomacy, economic growth and constructive cultural exchanges. With this event, the FDR Foundation hopes to reintroduce the powerful ideas of the Good Neighbor Policy to today’s policy discussions.“Latinos are the driving force of U.S. economic growth for all Americans,” said Trujillo, “and yet many Americans believe Latinos to be an economic threat. Policies to drive more robust economic growth for all Americans must include a clear-eyed understanding of Latinos’ economic dynamism, not stale stereotypes.” Together, Cisneros and Trujillo founded the Latino Donor Collaborative (LDC) in 2010 to change the narrative about the Latino community in the U.S. and garner support for even stronger Latino business growth. The nonprofit, nonpartisan organization works with media companies, policymakers and business leaders to advance an accurate perception and understanding of the contributions Latinos make to the U.S. economy and society. “We established the LDC not just to address a damaging misperception about the role of Latinos in our country, but also to promulgate ideas on how to bolster our economy for all Americans,” said Cisneros. “The Roosevelt Memorial Lecture will be an opportunity for us to reflect on the lessons of the Good Neighbor Policy and articulate modern-day best practices.”Cisneros served as the mayor of San Antonio in the 1980s, making history as the second Latino mayor of a major U.S. city. In addition, he served as Secretary of Housing and Urban Development during the Clinton administration. In 2000, Cisneros cofounded CityView, an investment management and development firm, and currently serves as the company’s chairman. He is also partner of Siebert Cisneros Shank LLC. Trujillo, the first U.S.-born Latino to serve as the CEO of a Fortune 200 company, has led three telecom giants in his career: Telstra, U.S. West and Orange S.A. He is the chairman of Trujillo Group Investments and currently sits on the corporate boards of Western Union, global advertising and public relations company WPP plc, and Chinese real estate platform Fang Holdings, Ltd. In the public sector, Trujillo has held executive positions in both federal and state governments. He served as a trade policy advisor to both the Clinton and George W. Bush administrations.“We are delighted to welcome two of the most important leaders of the U.S. Latino community to Harvard this year,” stated Michael Weishan, executive director of the Foundation. “Secretary Cisneros and Sol Trujillo, through their work in both the public and private sectors, have elevated and amplified Latino contributions to our national economy and shared culture.”The FDR Foundation recognizes prominent civic leaders each year at the Roosevelt Memorial Lecture. Past honorees include historian Doris Kearns Goodwin, authors Curtis Roosevelt and Jean Edward Smith, historian Cynthia M. Koch, filmmaker Ken Burns and The Honorable David Huebner, Ambassador to New Zealand and Samoa. Foundation programs include the FDR Global Engagement Initiative, The Creative Citizenry Program and the FDR Global Fellowships.This year, Deborah Anker, clinical professor of law at Harvard Law School, will moderate the discussion between the honorees. Professor Anker serves as director of Harvard Law School’s Harvard Immigration and Refugee Clinical Program.The Memorial Lecture will take place April 8 at 4:00 p.m. in Harvard University’s Harvard Hall. Admission is free; however, seating is limited. Register for the event at http://fdrfoundation.org/save-the-date-9th-annual-fdr-memorial-lecture/.last_img read more

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JQC records bill fails, new judges still in the works

first_img April 15, 2002 Regular News JQC records bill fails, new judges still in the works JQC records bill fails, new judges still in the workscenter_img The 2002 Regular Session of the Florida Legislature ended without any new judges being approved, but there’s a good chance that will change in the expected upcoming special budget session.And a proposed constitutional amendment to open records of the Judicial Qualifications Commission likewise died in the closing days after passing the House but failing to be considered in the Senate.Several other bills affecting the profession and the court system had varying fates in the always-hectic final days of the session.The last version of the certification legislation, HB 1927, cleared the Senate by a 39-0 vote on March 21. It called for one new circuit judgeship in each of the Fifth, Sixth, Seventh, Eighth, Ninth, 10th, 11th, 13th, 15th, 17th, 18th, and 20th circuits. It also called for the new judges to be elected this fall.The House version, which had passed a few days earlier, omitted the new judges in the Eighth, 13th, and 18th circuits and had the governor appoint the new judges to take office on March 1, 2003. It had passed the House 113-0 on March 19. The lower chamber never took up the revamped Senate version when it returned.The Senate’s original certification bill called for 10 new circuit judges, while the House’s initial version called for two new district court of appeal judges. Both were far less than Supreme Court Chief Justice Charles Wells requested in the annual certification opinion: 34 new circuit judges, 13 new county judges, and two DCA judges.Sen. Locke Burt, R-Ormond Beach, chair of the Senate Judiciary Committee, said the sticking issue was whether the new judges would be elected or appointed, with the Senate favoring election and the lower chamber wanting Gov. Jeb Bush to fill the new posts.“We had agreed on a number of judges, we had decided that they all be circuit judges, and we had decided they would start January 7, and the money is in the budget,” Burt said. “What we hadn’t resolved was elected versus appointed.”Since the money is in the budget, he expects that matter to be resolved in the special budget session — anticipated to be called in early May — although he added there is the possibility of a deadlock that results in no new judges.If that happens, it would be the second time in the past three sessions that no new judges have been approved, although in the 2000 session, it was due to a legislative oversight. Last year, lawmakers approved 26 of the 44 new judgeships requested by the court.Chief Justice Wells expressed optimism: “We are hopeful that the funding of at least some new judgeships will be part of the budget adopted in the special session which adopts next year’s budget,” he said.The proposed constitutional amendment to make all JQC proceedings and records open upon a finding of no probable cause passed the House on March 19 by a 79-33 vote. But the Senate sent the measure to its Judiciary Committee and allowed it to die there. An identical Senate resolution had already cleared the Judiciary Committee, but died in the Rules and Calendar Committee.The JQC had strongly opposed the measure — which was initially proposed by House Judicial Oversight Chair Larry Crow — arguing it would remove anonymity from those who file complaints and therefore hurt the process.Crow contended the process needs to be opened up, especially in light of the recent judicial impeachment proceedings in the House, and pointed out that “the public is thirsting for opening up these records.”But Burt said there was little enthusiasm for the measure in the upper chamber. “It got started in the system late and it had a number of committee references,” he said. “And it got caught in the system.”Even if it had made it to the Senate floor, Burt said there was considerable skepticism among senators, and it might have failed to get the 60 percent needed to pass a constitutional amendment.Sen. Skip Campbell, D-Tamarac, said that senators were also interested in sticking to an informal deal that last year gave the House a bill allowing the governor to appoint all the members to the judicial nominating commissions in exchange for no major changes to the court system this year.“A couple of senators felt very strongly it would stifle reporting of bad judges and went to leadership and asked them not to allow it to come up,” he said. What Passed: • The legislature passed and sent to the governor SB 1946, which sets out that a plaintiff must show a defendant failed to exercise reasonable care in maintaining a business premises in a slip-and-fall case. Lawmakers argued that the Supreme Court, in Owens v. Publix Supermarket, Inc. , 802 So. 2d 315 (Fla. 2001), had shifted too much of the burden of proof to defendants in such cases. The bill, supported by most retailers as well as the Academy of Florida Trial Lawyers, passed the Senate 35-0 and the House 118-0.• The legislature passed, unanimously in both chambers, HB 585, the Florida Uniform Principal and Income Act. It regulates several items relating to trusts, including judicial oversight and a trustee’s power to adjust between principal and income. The Real Property, Probate and Trust Law Section supported the bill.• The legislature passed, unanimously in both chambers, SB 720 to fix glitches in trust and probate laws, including setting time limits for creditors to file claims and setting notice requirements for certain trusts. The bill was supported by RPPTL and the Florida Bankers Association.• Effective July 1, F.S. §57.105 governing sanctions on parties filing frivolous claims in civil suits will conform to Rule 11 of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, thanks to SB 528 and HB 487. In short, the federal rule gives opposing parties 21 days to withdraw or correct a frivolous claim before a motion for sanctions can be filed with the court.• Both chambers passed unanimously a bill to require a court conducting arraignment, sentencing, or a case management hearing to advise a crime victim of certain statutory and constitutional rights. HB 1209 by Reps. Andy Gardiner, R-Orlando, and Mitch Needelman, R-Melbourne, and SB 1974 by Sen. Victor Crist, R-Tampa, will take effect July 1. A similar bill, SB 2066, would have required clerks of court to provide information to crime victims about enforcing a civil judgment or lien against the defendant. That bill died in the Judiciary Committee.• SB 434 and HB 1391 passed unanimously through both chambers. The engrossed bill would require the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles to deliver jury lists to the clerks of circuit court on a quarterly basis. Current law requires the DHSMV to provide those lists only once per year. The new law becomes effective October 1.• SB 288 by Sen. Campbell intended to cut down on the delays of placing children in the state’s care up for adoption or back with their families passed the Senate 34-0 on March 14 and cleared the House 116-0 on March 22.• HB 787 (identical to SB 944), supported by the Business Law Section as a way to fix glitches in the limited liability corporation laws, passed unanimously in both the House and the Senate.• SB 1568 by Sen. Burt passed both the House and Senate unanimously. When the bill becomes effective July 1, all attorneys listed on the statewide registry of attorneys in private practice who are available to represent people in postconviction capital collateral proceedings must complete at least 10 hours of continuing legal education per year devoted specifically to the defense of capital cases.• passing HB 1679, the legislature imposed a moratorium on clerks of court placing certain public judicial records on the Internet and agreed to create the Study Committee on Public Records. Groups such as the Judicial Management Council and the Supreme Court Workgroup on Public Records have been tasked with investigating different aspects of public court records — looking at everything from electronic access to what constitutes a court record — and now the legislature has authorized and funded a statewide, multi-disciplinary group. The bill amends F.S. §28.2221, passed during the 2000 session, which required every clerk of court to provide for electronic retrieval of court documents by January 1, 2006. • SB 1978, revamping F.S. §105.031 to require an earlier qualifying period for candidates for judicial office, died in committee, but the bill language was engrossed in SB 618, which subsequently passed both chambers. The earlier qualifying period in the new bill mimics the qualifying period for federal candidates. What Didn’t Pass: • HB 595 and SB 732, both of which would have required courts to impose an additional $35 court fee on people pleading no contest or guilty to charges of domestic violence, died in the Committee on Fiscal Policy and Resources and the Appropriations Subcommittee on Public Safety and the Judiciary, respectively. The money collected would have been used to help fund legal services for domestic violence victims.• The House passed, but the Senate failed to take up, HB 307, which would have helped assistant state attorneys and public defenders repay law school loans to help attract new attorneys to those public service jobs. The measure passed in the House 113-0 on March 19 and was sent to the Senate, which referred it to the Judiciary Committee and never took it up. A similar Senate bill, SB 1138, passed the Senate Judiciary and Governmental Oversight and Productivity committees, but died in an appropriations subcommittee.•A proposal to increase the number of people who can act as “retired judges” died on calendar in both chambers. HB 17, sponsored by Rep. Sally Heyman, D-North Miami Beach, and SB 424 by Sen. Daryl Jones, D-Miami, would have allowed judges or justices defeated in a popular or merit retention election to serve as retired judges, provided they had served at least 10 years on the bench and met other provisions established by the Supreme Court.• Rep. Ken Sorensen’s, R-Tavernier, plan to require each district court of appeal to be made up of at least one judge from each represented judicial circuit, HB 205, died on calendar. The Senate version, SB 1800, sponsored by Sen. Alex Diaz de la Portilla, R-Miami, stalled out between the chambers.• Some of the most sweeping changes proposed this year were found in joint resolutions by Sen. Anna Cowin, R-Leesburg, (SJR 1528) and Rep. Bruce Kyle, R-Ft. Myers, (HJR 1), which would have revamped Article V of the Constitution regarding the judiciary. Among the changes proposed were limitations on habeas corpus and specifying that courts could only act when there was an actual dispute, which critics said would eliminate declaratory judgments. The amendments would also have allowed the legislature to designate any of the five district courts of appeal as the final arbiter in a specific area of law, such as death penalty cases or administrative law appeals. Kyle’s bill was sent to the Judicial Oversight Committee, but never heard. Cowin’s bill was heard in the Judiciary Committee, but bogged down there and was eventually amended completely to become the Senate version of the bill to open up JQC records.• At one point during the session, SJR 1666, sponsored by Sens. Ron Silver, D-North Miami, and Tom Rossin, D-Royal Palm Beach, would have imposed an eight-year term limit on Florida Supreme Court justices. But, after combining the bill with SB 1118, the judicial provision was removed. The final bill would have raised the limit from eight to 12 years on Florida representatives, senators, and Cabinet members, but died in messages.• Rep. David Simmons, R-Altamonte Springs, introduced HB 503, and Sen. Campbell introduced its counterpart, SB 1266, which would have changed the jurisdiction of Florida’s trial courts. The bills would have shifted certain felonies, including certain traffic and bad check offenses, to county court. HB 503 died in the Committee on Criminal Justice Appropriations, and SB 1266 in the Judiciary Committee.• Both House and Senate legislation to spread the Unified Family Court model across the state died in committees — the Council for Smarter Government and Fiscal Responsibility Council, respectively. HB 1455, sponsored by Reps. Ken Gottlieb, D-Miramar, and Cindy Lerner, D-Miami, and SB 1226 would have created the Family Code and provided for the reorganization of certain courts to mimic the Unified Family Court. The pilot program recommended in the Supreme Court’s Model Family Court plan has already been implemented in the Sixth Circuit.• Rep. Fred Brummer’s, R-Apopka, plan to make Judicial Nominating Commission proceedings public, HJR 1465, died in the Committee on Judicial Oversight. The bill did not have a Senate companion.• Another bill by Brummer, HJR 1337, would have replaced the Bar and the Supreme Court with the Department of Business and Professional Regulation as the entity responsible for regulating lawyers. The bill died in the Committee on Business Regulation.• Two bills hotly contested by environmental groups — HB 257 and SB 280 — will not make it to the governor’s desk. The House version passed through the full House with a 94-24 vote, but the bill died when it was referred to several Senate committees in the last days of the session. The Senate companion bill died in the Appropriations Subcommittee on General Government and never reached the full chamber. The bills would have revised the requirements for pleadings, motions, and other papers filed under the Administrative Procedures Act — a provision which environmental groups said would limit public access to the system.• HB 1191 by Rep. Gary Siplin, D-Orlando, would have repealed F.S. §923.03 regarding indictments. The bill died in the Committee on Crime Prevention, Corrections & Safety.• SB 300, which eliminated statute of limitations for sex crimes where DNA evidence is available, passed the Senate on March 6, but died in the House. A similar bill, HB 1597, passed the House on second reading but died on the calendar without being taken up for third reading and final passage. A similar bill by Rep. Holly Benson. R-Pensacola, (HB 655) would have removed the time limitations for any case in which the perpetrator is identified by DNA evidence collected at the crime scene. That bill died in Judicial Oversight.• Two bills (HB 1615 and SB 1212) attempted to set age boundaries on who could be sentenced to death, but neither bill passed both chambers. Both bills provided that only criminals who were 18 years old or older at the time they committed the crime could be sentenced to death. The Senate version passed its chamber unanimously, then was referred to a House committee where it later died. The House version died in Criminal Justice Appropriations.• SB 2160 would have amended the Florida Evidence Code to provide for disclosure of certain information that is otherwise inadmissible and eliminated the need to renew certain objections to preserve appellate rights, but died in the Judiciary Committee.• Four connected bills (two bills and two linked trust fund allotments) would have created and funded provisions for certain nonviolent drug offenders to be referred to drug treatment or drug-offender probation. The House bills were removed prior to consideration, and the Senate bills died in committee.• An attempt by Sen. Anna Cowin to correct the judicial funding shortfall for this fiscal year was thwarted when SB 2080 died between chambers. The bill would have increased the amount of certain civil penalties to be paid into the County Article V Trust Fund and decreased the amount paid into the General Revenue Fund. It passed the Senate unanimously but never reached the House floor. To check the latest status of a bill, visit Online Sunshine, the Florida Legislature’s Web site, at http://www.leg.state.fl.us/Welcome/index.cfm . Under “Session,” click on “Bills and Related Documents,” then use the pull down menus to find a complete list of regular session bills.last_img read more

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