Abraham Lincoln CSG ships start first tactical drills

first_img View post tag: DESRON 2 View post tag: US Navy Photo: Guided-missile destroyer USS Nitze (DDG 94) conducts a Mk 45 5″ gun shoot as part of Surface Warfare Advanced Tactical Training (SWATT) exercise. Photo: US Navy Share this article View post tag: SWATT View post tag: USS Abraham Lincoln US Navy cruisers and destroyers assigned to the carrier strike group assembled around aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) and other Norfolk-based units got underway from Naval Station Norfolk for the surface warfare advanced tactical training (SWATT) exercise on November 2.SWATT is the Surface Force’s premier advanced tactical training exercise developed and led by Naval Surface and Mine Warfighting Development Center (SMWDC).SWATT provides multi-ship, multi-platform, multi-warfare area training at sea to increase combat capability, lethality, and interoperability. Staffs and units participating in the exercise are Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 2, USS Leyte Gulf (CG 55), USS Bainbridge (DDG 96), USS Gonzalez (DDG 66), USS Mason (DDG 87), USS Gravely (DDG 107), and USS Nitze (DDG 94).“The establishment of SMWDC in 2015 represented the beginning of an important cultural shift in the Surface Fleet to rapidly increase Surface Force tactical proficiency, readiness, and combat capability,” said Rear Adm. Dave Welch, commander of SMWDC. “This first East Coast CSG SWATT represents our commitment to the entirety of the Surface Force. SWATT provides a critical path for Warfare and Strike Group commanders to develop the combat capability needed by our Numbered Fleet Commanders to compete effectively in an era of Great Power Competition.”SWATT exercises provide dedicated in port and at sea training periods particularly focused on the development of air defense and sea combat commanders, ships, and watch teams. In particularly, SWATTs provide focused training to support naval sea control including integrated air and missile defense (IAMD), anti-submarine/surface warfare (ASW/SUW), amphibious warfare (AMW), mine warfare (MIW), and information warfare (IW).“While our headquarters is located in San Diego, we have divisions on both coasts and team members in most fleet concentration areas. We are committed to increasing the combat power of naval surface forces, with focus on warship cohesion. It is a team-based approach to what a warship is designed to do – fight and win at sea as part of a Naval Task Group,” said Capt. Joe Cahill, SMWDC Sea Combat Division Direction and SMWDC’s Air Defense senior-mentor underway for the exercise.SWATT is specifically designed to be a learning environment whereby teams receive over-the-shoulder mentoring throughout events, and where training vice certification or exit criteria are the basis of success.Senior, post major-command mentors, Warfare Tactics Instructors (WTI), and technical community experts, plan events, brief teams, and embark warships for underway to train and mentor teams. Those teams lead a formalized Plan, Brief, Execute, Debrief (PBED) process to develop the training audience during the underway. After planning and completing a training event, as part of the PBED process, mentors and WTIs leverage technical community expertise to provide rapid debrief using replay tools enabling watch teams to critically assess their own performance and improve. The most significant benefit to watch teams is they learn from the most accurate information and develop the critical thinking skills to continue learning throughout the integrated phase of training and deployment.Ultimately, SWATT events provide high-fidelity system, tactics, and human performance data needed by the surface warfare community to improve combat power at and from the sea. After SWATT concludes, data recorded during the events is further extracted through a partnership between SMWDC and Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC) – Corona. There the data is reviewed in a Data Analysis Working Group which analyzes system, operator, and tactics performance. The results are parsed out to appropriate entities within SMWDC and the surface warfare community to refine doctrine and tactical guidance, provide capabilities assessments, define future requirements, and to inform future training events.SMWDC has four divisions focused on MIW, AMW, IAMD, and ASW/SUW. SMWDC is a subordinate command of Commander, Naval Surface Forces and exists to increase the lethality and tactical proficiency of Surface Force across all domains.last_img read more

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Associate Professor/Full Professor – School of Nursing (Morgantown Campus)

first_imgDoctoral degree required.Graduate degree in Nursing required.Research Doctorate in Nursing encouraged to apply.Two (2) years post-doctoral training encouraged to apply.Evidence of ability to execute and sustain a program ofresearch.Current external funding or NIH grant application underdevelopment encouraged to apply.Minimum of three (3) peer reviewed publications within past 5years expected. West Virginia University School of Nursing invites applicants foran Associate Professor/Full Professor (Tenure-Track) Facultyposition on our Morgantown Campus. The successful candidate willprovide significant contributions to teaching and research and willreport to the department chair. Responsibilities include but notlimited to maintaining an active equity-oriented research agendawith relevance to the mission of the school, seeking and obtainingexternal funding, teaching and mentoring graduate and/orundergraduate students in one or more programs, and providingservice to the school, the department, and the university.The WVU School of Nursing remains committed to providing thehighest levels of undergraduate professional nursing education,while expanding opportunities for graduate education. Our MSNprogram continues to prepare Nurse Practitioners with faculty whoare experts in using technology with “high touch” skills. Ourschool also offers two doctoral programs, a Doctor of NursingPractice (DNP)–the highest level of nursing practice, and theDoctor of Philosophy (PhD) for nurses desiring a research career.Start-up packages will be negotiated individually with the Dean ofthe School of Nursing. Rank and salary will be commensurate withthe individual’s professional background and experience.West Virginia University is a land grant Carnegie-designatedDoctoral Research/Extensive institution, with approximately 32,500students, including 27,000 undergraduate and 5,500graduate/professional students. The WVU Health Sciences Centerincludes the Schools of Pharmacy, Medicine, Dentistry, PublicHealth and Nursing. Patient care facilities include a 690-bedteaching hospital, a Level I trauma center, and a 70-bedpsychiatric hospital. Morgantown is within easy traveling distanceof Washington, DC, to the east, Pittsburgh, PA, to the north, andCleveland and Columbus, OH, to the northwest. Morgantown has 55,000residents and is rated as one of the best small towns in the U.S.,with affordable housing, excellent schools, a picturesquecountryside and many outdoor activities.Qualifications : Electronic submission of application to: https://wvu.taleo.net/careersection/faculty/jobdetail.ftl?job=13400with supporting credentials (a letter of interest, currentcurriculum vitae and contact information for three professionalreferences including names, postal addresses, email addresses andphone numbers). Review of applications will begin immediately andwill continue until the position is filled by a qualifiedcandidate. Salary and academic rank will be commensurate withqualifications and experience. For more information on the Schoolof Nursing, please visit https://nursing.hsc.wvu.edu/.West Virginia University is proud to be an Equal Opportunityemployer and is the recipient of an NSF ADVANCE award for genderequity. The University values diversity among its faculty, staff,and students, and invites applications from all qualifiedapplicants regardless of race, ethnicity, color, religion, genderidentity, sexual orientation, age, nationality, genetics,disability, or Veteran status.last_img read more

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Ween Debuts Live Performance Of “King Billy” In Chicago [Watch]

first_imgWeen played their first of two nights in Chicago last night at the Aragon Ballroom, marking their fourth performance of 2017 after three nights at the Brooklyn Bowl in Las Vegas last month. The dynamic duo, characteristically known as Gene and Dean Ween, led bassist Dave Dreiwitz, keyboardist Glenn McClelland and drummer Claude Coleman through a “Transdermal Celebration” with a 26-song setlist.About half way through their set, Ween debuted their first live performance of the 2007 The Friends EP track “King Billy,” which had never been given proper attention from the full band. Thanks to Monica Hampton, you can watch the debut below: Edit this setlist | More Ween setlists[cover photo by @aaronbradleyphoto]last_img

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Bloomberg’s executive editor focused on transparency in financial reporting

first_img Read Full Story Financial reporting is crucial to a fair and functioning democracy, said Laurie Hays, senior executive editor for Beat Reporting at Bloomberg News. The challenge that financial reporters face, she said, is presenting complex economic issues in a way that large audiences can understand. Yet it is important because “the bottom line is…the bottom line,” she said, and “if you don’t understand money, you don’t know how to write about power,” she continued, emphasizing the importance of financial reporting to hold accountable those in the highest places of power.Highlighting several stories recently published by Bloomberg, Hays argued that the stories they publish illustrate their commitment to transparency and transformation in the economic sector.In 2011, Bloomberg reporters uncovered a story about secret loans from the Fed that gave billions of dollars to banks, all the while undisclosed to Congress. The story received a special citation at the 2012 Goldsmith Awards.The 2011 story “Consider the Koch Brothers” revealed that a unit of Koch Industries “paid bribes to win contracts” in other countries, and “falsified data about emissions of benzyne, which is a known cause of cancer.”“The world needs financial journalists to uncover wrongdoing before it becomes a crisis,” she said. While it’s not always easy to foresee a catastrophe before it unfolds, Hays explained that at Bloomberg reporters work to flag crises “before they get out of control.”last_img read more

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Mountain Mama: Sacred Places

first_imgThe sacred places, the ones that become annual rites of passages, mark the year’s progress. The landscape reminds us where we’ve been, and the breeze carries our dreams for the year ahead.Newtowne Neck State Park is one of my special places, as much for the memories the contour of the land holds as for the people I spend time with when I’m there.The state of Maryland purchased a peninsula that jets out into the Potomac River from the Jesuits, an order of Catholic priests who farmed the land for 300 years. The State of Maryland developed a paradise for swimmers, sea kayakers, and stand up paddle boarders along seven miles of sandy shoreline.photo1Back when the Jesuits still owned it, I was twelve-years old and my family lived about a mile away in a rundown farmhouse.Landlocked, my brothers and I explored where we could, wandering the graveyard dating back to the 1700s and making up stories about the children buried there. We rode our bikes between fields of towering corn stalks well past twilight.The state park provides something for our kids that we never had for the year we lived there – access to the river. The strands of golden beaches offer a connection to the water, a place to swim, crab, beachcomb, and launch kayaks.It’s become a family tradition, to load our own kids and a fleet of kayaks and pile into a couple trucks.Newtowne Neck is still a place with more land than people, where time seems to slow down and even our kids get quiet and still enough to notice the changing tides and the ospreys diving for dinner.photo3My sister-in-law, Oona, and I float in kayaks while our kids splash in the water.She turns to me. “What a difference a year makes. Remember the conversations we had here last year?”Memories wash over me. Last year I was talking about taking Tobin sailing for a month. The idea seemed so daunting and impossible, but also possessed me because at the time it was the only thing I really wanted to do. I was contemplating leaving a job and starting my own business. A year later, I have started a business and we set sail last January.I gaze at Tobin. Last year he was three, a few months away from turning four. He was still shy most of the time, greeting strangers with his face buried into the back of my knees, terrified of being seen by the world.Tobin calls out to me and interrupts my thoughts. “Mama, we want a turn with the kayaks.”I see his older cousin already climbing into a kayak, so I paddle to shore and watch as he gets into my kayak.Tobin paddles his own kayak for the first time. The kayak, big and unwieldy, makes it difficult for his small body to control. When he can’t turn the kayak, he stands up and sits down facing his body toward the stern, continuing to paddle forward in an effort to keep up with his big cousin.I dip my toes in the water standing side-by-side with Oona, admiring our sons’ respective growth over the past year. We do the thing parents do, wondering aloud, “How did he get so big?”The boys paddle further out into the water, further away from us.I try to remember who Tobin was a year ago, trying to recall what phrases he said and what he liked to play. I struggle to conjure up his three-year-old self and I begin to doubt if I was present enough in his life, or even my own.Tobin lands his kayak and pulls it up on the beach, out of reach from the incoming tide. His shoulders and back look so strong. He’s all muscle and ribs, none of his toddler fat remains.He runs up to me. “Mama, I leaned my kayak way over, I was tacking it.”I laugh. Tacking is a sailing term for turning the bow of a boat through the wind and inevitably the boat leans over on its side. We’ve led a watery life together and he’s integrating the experiences in his mind, making them his own.The sun lowers in the sky and I wrap a towel around Tobin. He reaches his arms upward, toward me. “Mama, hold me.”I scoop him in my arms and press him close, aware that time passes and we grow older, whether we intend to or nor. Standing in there bathed by the bright pastels of the setting sun, all my other goals and dreams fall away.All that is left is the important stuff – I am experiencing this sacred place with my son and some of our most beloved.More from Mountain Mama:last_img read more

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East Meadow Man Drowned in Penn., Reports Say

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A 29-year-old East Meadow man reportedly drowned in a Pennsylvania lake over the Fourth of July weekend.Gabriel Pierro was found floating in Paupackan Lake in Paupak Township shortly after 9 p.m. Sunday, Wayne County authorities told news outlets in northeastern Pennsylvania.The victim was pronounced dead two hours later, according to news reports.last_img

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Local restaurants feel the heat of recent Maines Paper and Food Service decline

first_imgShe is now working to fill the void Maines left, but said other vendors don’t have what she needs. However, she hopes it doesn’t hurt her clientele. Co-owner of Lupo’s, Steve Lupo, has been using the company for more than 40 years for products ranging from steak to produce. “There were times we bought seventy percent of our products from them,” Lupo explained Wednesday. So now he says, “I’ll be using another vendor, and I’ll have to watch pricing, we used Maines because of their quality and because their pricing was always fair, so we’re going to have to go to other vendors, maybe expect some shortages.” Not the only one feeling the impact, Chroma Cafe and Bakery in Binghamton is dealing with the same change. Looking to the future when things return to normal, Lupo predicts, “You’re going to have big pushes and bigger shortages probably because you’re going to have how many restaurants in each area, opening up, trying to open up immediately.” Lindsey Cummings saying, “We’re going to try and see if we can make it through.” Also, the loss of the supplier is hurting her wallet because she said the prices were so affordable. Also a fan of the quality and prices, owner Gerilyn Lindsey-Cummings says, “It’s going to be hard to find those things in other places.” After all those years, however, Lupo received a call from his Maines salesman this week. “Our customers are used to a certain product and a certain standard and if we have to alter that in some way, I just don’t want our customers to be disappointed,” explained Lindsey-Cummings. (WBNG) — Restaurants across the Southern Tier that relied on Maines Paper and Food Service for products now struggle to fill a major void amid the company’s shutdown of service. It’s a change that isn’t helping the already dire, local restaurant situation. “He no longer has his job because Maines is no longer operating their distribution center to restaurants,” said Lupo.last_img read more

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Governor Wolf Takes Important Steps Toward Strengthening Workforce Development, Improving Efforts to Help People with Disabilities Find Employment

first_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitter Governor Wolf Takes Important Steps Toward Strengthening Workforce Development, Improving Efforts to Help People with Disabilities Find Employment March 10, 2016center_img Economy,  Government That Works,  Jobs That Pay,  Press Release,  Results,  Workforce Development Harrisburg, PA – Governor Tom Wolf today took two important steps that will improve and strengthen workforce development in Pennsylvania by aligning workforce development efforts with the private sector, strengthening connections between public sector efforts, and making the workforce development process more inclusive. Governor Wolf announced his administration has begun the submission process of the Pennsylvania Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) four-year combined state plan to the United States Department of Labor (USDOL). This plan will allow Pennsylvania to coordinate workforce training and funding to ensure Pennsylvania workers of all ages have the skills to compete in the 21st century and employers have a skilled workforce that aligns with emerging needs. Governor Wolf also signed an executive order to increase integrated employment opportunities among people with disabilities in Pennsylvania.“Since taking office, I have made creating jobs that pay and a government that works key priorities, and today I am taking important steps to strengthen workforce development in Pennsylvania,” said Governor Wolf. “This is a starting point for an unprecedented effort in Pennsylvania to transcend fragmented workforce programs, overcome silos, and promote program integration.”New federal legislation requires each state to submit a four-year unified or combined state plan outlining the state’s workforce development strategy. Pennsylvania used the opportunity to work with the private sector and many agencies including the departments of Labor & Industry, Aging, Agriculture, Community and Economic Development, Corrections, Education, Human Services, and Military and Veterans Affairs to create a plan that strengthen workforce development in Pennsylvania while leveraging federal efforts.There are five broad goals for the commonwealth’s workforce development plan:Establish clear career pathways.Expand public-private investment in the state’s pipeline of workers and incumbent workers.Increase opportunities for all youth to participate in work-based learning.Engage employers through multi-employer workforce partnerships.Strengthen data sharing across state agencies and workforce development partners.Pennsylvania cannot succeed without a strong workforce, and today’s actions will make it easier for Pennsylvania’s public and private sectors to work together to improve the commonwealths efforts to improve the workforce and strengthen the economy.Furthermore, Governor Wolf recognized that often those with disabilities face barriers to integrated employment opportunities and signed an executive order to make hiring and workforce development more inclusive. Wolf’s executive order is designed to increase employment among people with disabilities, and his administration will explore ways to reduce barriers to employment, as well as conduct a thorough review of programs and policies with a goal of increasing the overall number of people with disabilities who are employed in competitive-integrated jobs. The plan will also work to align funding, policy, data collection, and practices.“This action will increase the hiring of Pennsylvanians with a disability by allowing the commonwealth to tap a largely unused labor pool, and we will position Pennsylvania to be a model state in creating a climate hospitable to workers with a disability, who are a valuable resource,” Governor Wolf said.  “Under this executive order, competitive, integrated employment becomes the first consideration and preferred outcome of publicly funded education, training, employment, and long-term supports and service programs for working-age Pennsylvanians with a disability.”Like Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolflast_img read more

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Governor Wolf Addresses Elder Access to Justice Conference, Warns of the AHCA’s Damaging Effects on Seniors

first_imgGovernor Wolf Addresses Elder Access to Justice Conference, Warns of the AHCA’s Damaging Effects on Seniors SHARE Email Facebook Twitter Healthcare,  National Issues,  Press Release,  Public Health,  Seniors Blue Bell, PA – Today, Governor Tom Wolf offered remarks at the fifth annual Elder Access to Justice Roundtable Conference in Blue Bell, highlighting his administration’s efforts to protect seniors and focusing on the harmful effects of the American Health Care Act (AHCA).“One of the most important jobs of government is protecting the benefits and financial security of older Pennsylvanians,” Gov. Wolf said. “The American Health Care Act is an especially harmful and damaging piece of legislation that targets services and populations that need health care the most, including Pennsylvania’s seniors.”Numerous national senior and medical organizations oppose the AHCA, including the AARP, the American Medical Association, and the American Hospital Association.“The AHCA guts protections and services that Pennsylvania seniors rely on to get quality, affordable care,” Governor Wolf said. “Make no mistake, under this proposal, seniors lose coverage, the ability to make their own choices, and they lose money.“Earlier this week I joined Senator Bob Casey to oppose the devastating impacts this plan would have on Pennsylvanians. And I pledge to continue to fight against this misguided legislation, and to stand up for older Pennsylvanians.”The Elder Access to Justice Conference was created to bring together diverse representatives of the community to raise awareness, and to prevent, identify and address elder abuse, neglect and exploitation by enhancing communication, identifying systemic problems, sponsoring training, and improving access to justice in Montgomery County.Pennsylvania Department of Aging Secretary Teresa Osborne was keynote speaker. More than 150 attorneys, representatives of senior stakeholder groups, including SeniorLAW Center and Community Legal Services, Montgomery County Aging and Adult Services, and clinical and social workers attended the conference, held at Montgomery County Community College.center_img June 16, 2017last_img read more

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Cory Michael Dufrene

first_imgCory Michael Dufrene, age 38, of Osgood passed away Saturday, May 13, 2017. Cory was born in Dearborn County on November 3, 1978 the son of Dwight Dufrene of Paradis, Louisiana, and Sandra (Short) Dufrene of Manchester, Indiana.Cory spent several years in Louisiana growing up and attended Hahnville High School in Boutte, Louisiana. After school he enlisted in the Army, and was stationed in Fort Carson, CO. He served tours defending our country in Bosnia and Kosovo.In the fall of 2001, he met what would become the love of his life Rachel Ent, and the two were married on September 20, 2003. They have resided in Osgood for the past several years. They have 2 sons, Jarod an 8th grader at Jac-Cen-Del; and special blessing, Cole. Cory has always been the light and hero in Cole’s many battles throughout his life. After coming to Osgood, Cory spent several years working at Valeo in Greensburg, IN.Cory is survived wife, Rachel, and his sons of Osgood, his parents, sister Traci Dufrene of North Carolina, father- in- law Norman Ent of Cincinnati, mother- in -law Vicki (Tim Chrisman) Ent of Osgood, and grandmother March Dufrene of Louisiana.A gathering of friends and family will be held Friday, May 19, 2017 at Neal’s Funeral Home in Osgood at 11:00 am until the time of the funeral at 12:00 noon. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to the family in care of the Funeral Homelast_img read more

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