Padda says Adamson got ‘too excited, complacent’ in set 4 breakdown

first_imgPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netAdamson University needed just three more points to pull of a stunner against Ateneo in the second round of the UAAP Season 80 women’s volleyball tournament.The Lady Falcons held a commanding 22-15 lead in the fourth set against the Lady Eagles, then a baffling collapse  allowed Ateneo to come back en route to the win, 24-26, 25-19, 21-25, 26-24, 15-12.ADVERTISEMENT Arwind Santos shows fighting form: ‘I just wanted to win’ Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Adamson head coach Air Padda was in disbelief over how they squandered a seven-point lead down the stretch in the fourth set.“Sayang! (That was close!) Honestly, we should’ve taken care of them in the fourth, the fourth set was our set,” said Padda Sunday at Smart Araneta Coliseum.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSAfter winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folkSPORTSTim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crownPadda added her players got carried away with the momentum, especially against Ateneo who have developed into one of the league’s elite after taking two championships in six straight finals appearances.“I guess the curse of Adamson is that we don’t have a winning culture and when you’re trying to create a winning culture our team just gets too excited,” said Padda. “They get too complacent and they feel like they’ve already won the game.” Although the Lady Eagles were able to come back in the fourth set, not all of those points were of their own volition.Ateneo closed the fourth set on an 11-4 run and four of the points that got put on the Lady Eagles’ board were Adamson’s errors.Jema Galanza was called with a controversial net touch—video replays shown on the telecast proved otherwise, but it can’t be used to reverse the referee’s decision—that trimmed the lead to 22-19.Another crucial error that was called once again featured Galanza when lead referee Fernando Velarde called a crossing violation after Adamson’s skipper landed on an off-speed kill that tied the set at 24-24.A non-call on Galanza’s play would’ve awarded Adamson the game, instead the error allowed Ateneo to further catch up and extend the match to the fifth set.ADVERTISEMENT Recto seeks to establish Taal rehab body to aid community, eruption victims Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award In Liverpool, Man United sees the pain and path to recovery Nadine Lustre’s phone stolen in Brazil Conor McGregor seeks to emerge from controversy in UFC comeback LATEST STORIES Padda, who previously lashed out at referees’ inconsistencies in her matches, tried to hold herself back from criticizing the officials but she was still surprised with how the calls were made especially in the late stages of the fourth set.“There were a few calls that were iffy, but I don’t know,” said Padda whose team slipped to 5-6 and to the fifth seed in the standings. “I was surprised with the call he made on Jema, I’m not gonna lie, that was at game point.”Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Scarlett Johansson, Sterling K. Brown among SAG Awards presenters MOST READ Judy Ann’s 1st project for 2020 is giving her a ‘stomachache’ Cabuyao City rising above the ashes through volunteerism Jiro Manio arrested for stabbing man in Marikina Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. View commentslast_img read more

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DDTV: AN INCREDIBLE MOVIE FEATURING LETTERKENNY IN 1947

first_imgTHIS is the incredible footage of Letterkenny in 1947, featuring the town to a new generation like they’ve never seen before.Made by Tony Duffy and Sally Blake the 31-minute long video will bring back memories for older people; and preserves forever our past for future generations. Click on the video to watch.DDTV: AN INCREDIBLE MOVIE FEATURING LETTERKENNY IN 1947 was last modified: June 18th, 2011 by gregShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:letterkenny 1947last_img read more

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HSU athletic director Dan Collen to retire following fall sports season

first_imgArcata >> The longest tenured athletic director in Humboldt State University history, after bleeding green and gold for more than three decades, has decided it’s time to retire.Dan Collen, 61, will finish his HSU career at the end of the 2016 fall sports season after 15 years of leading HSU Athletics and 35 years of service to Humboldt State.“I have been blessed to have been involved with HSU Athletics,” Collen said. “It’s been an honor to work alongside such a tremendous staff and to work …last_img

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Weird science of Vredefort Dome

first_img11 May 2006“It’s like being in the Bermuda Triangle,” says Rodger Hart of the iThemba Laboratory for Accelerator Based Science in South Africa. I take the compass to see for myself.At first the needle points in a steady direction, which for all I know could be magnetic north. But then I take a step forward, and the needle swings to a completely different quadrant. Another step, and yet another direction.Next I put the compass down against the large rock outcropping we are standing on. Now as I move the compass across the rock, with every few centimetres of motion the needle swings around.The location is the centre of the Vredefort Crater, about 100 kilometres southwest of Johannesburg. Vredefort is the oldest and largest impact remnant on the planet, created about two billion years ago when a 10-kilometre-wide asteroid slammed into the earth. Evidence of older collisions exists elsewhere, in South Africa and in Western Australia, but in those cases no geologic structure has survived the ravages of time.Vredefort itself is not obviously a crater to the untrained eye. Geologists estimate the total crater size at 250 to 300 kilometres across, but the rim has long since been eroded away. The most obvious structure remaining is the Vredefort Dome, which is the crater’s “rebound peak” – where deep rocks rose up in the crater’s centre after the impact.According to Hart, the probable source of Vredefort’s weird magnetism was a strong and chaotic magnetic field generated by currents flowing in the ionized gases produced at the height of the collision.Laboratory experiments confirm that impacts cause intense magnetic fields in that fashion. Scientists have calculated that a mere one-kilometre-wide asteroid, one tenth the size of Vredefort’s, would create a field 1,000 times that of the earth’s at a distance of 100 kilometres.Vredefort’s intense but random magnetism was not apparent from aerial surveys. Those analyses showed anomalously low magnetism over the crater, like a hole punched in the prevailing magnetic field. All the magnetic madness on the ground averages out to nothing when seen from too high up.The results could have implications not only for earth geology but also for studies of Mars. The immense Martian basins Hellas and Argyre displayed virtually no magnetism when measured by the orbiting Mars Global Surveyor.The conventional explanation runs like this: when these craters formed around four billion years ago, the impacts wiped out the preexisting magnetization of the rocks. Therefore, at the time of their creation Mars must not have had a magnetic field, because that field would have been preserved in the magnetization of the basins’ rocks when they cooled. Mars does not now have a magnetic field, but long ago it did. Thus, the standard explanation implies that Mars lost its field very early on.But as Hart points out, if the Hellas and Argyre basins show the same properties as the Vredefort Crater, one cannot conclude anything about Mars’s magnetic field when they were formed – it may have still been going strong. Mario Acuna, a principal investigator on the Mars Global Surveyor project, however, points out that data from smaller Martian craters of about Vredefort’s size do not agree with Hart’s scenario.Back on earth, Hart has proposed a high-resolution helicopter survey of Vredefort’s magnetism, from an altitude low enough to see the magnetic variations. That would produce a complete magnetic map – and make some sense of the crater’s weirdness.This article originally appeared in Scientific American. Graham P Collins is on the board of editors of the magazine, to which he has been a contributor for several years. His visit to South Africa was funded by the International Marketing Council as part of the 2005 SA Solutions tour of leading science journalists to centres of scientific and technological excellence in South Africa.Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

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Where LEDs Make a Really Big Impact

first_imgWhen you pay 65 cents a kilowatt hour for electricity, something as simple as swapping an old-fashioned incandescent light bulb for an LED lamp can add up to big savings. Year-rounders on two Maine islands are finding out just how much.Under a sustainability program run by the Maine-based Island Institute, and with a volume discount from a Portland wholesaler, thousands of LED lamps have been made available to residents of Matinicus and Monhegan, the only two year-round islands in Maine where electricity still is produced by diesel generators. Electricity costs on Matinicus are five times the national average, and twice the relatively high rates charged by Hawaiian utilities.According to an article in the Maine Sunday Telegram, 610 LEDs were shipped by ferry last month to Matinicus and sold to residents for $1 each. Another 400 LEDs will be sent this winter, resulting in total savings of $8,000, according to the newspaper. On Monhegan, the 2,326 LEDs sent over this year will help customers save a total of $15,000.The program will help people like Cynthia Young and her husband, a lobsterman, on Matinicus. They are two of between 15 and 60 people who make the island their year-round home, and they can pay as much as $600 a month for electricity during the winter. The Island Institute delivered 65 bulbs to them recently, which will light their house and a barn/apartment where two other fishermen live.Savings add up quickly. Assuming the LED would be used for two hours per day, and factoring in the type of incandescent bulb it replaced, the Island Institute’s Ben Algeo predicts an annual savings of $30 per year per bulb on Matinicus. Savings would be even bigger on Monhegan, where the Maine Public Utilities Commission lists the cost of electricity at 74 cents a kWh. There’s a downside for the utilityAlthough savings could be significant for island residents, there’s a downside for the tiny utilities that serve them.“It’s a Catch-22,” Matinicus tax collector George Tarkleson told the Telegram’s‘s Tux Turkel. “If we have fewer kilowatt hours, we are going to have to keep raising the rates.”Lower sales is one of several problems that the Matinicus Plantation Electric Company mentioned in the latest town report, along with fewer winter residents, late payments, and aging equipment. All those factors are putting more pressure on revenues.Turkel reports that Algeo has been looking to Naushon island off the coast of Massachusetts as a model for reducing reliance on diesel generation in Maine. There, incandescent bulbs were replaced with compact fluorescents lamps 10 years ago; then old refrigerators were exchanged for newer, more efficient models. Finally, the island invested in a photovoltaic system with battery storage, and taken together these efforts reduced diesel use by 70%.Still, judging from comments posted after the Telegram article was published November 8, not everyone issold on energy-efficient lighting.“Someone sold them a bill of goods,” one reader said. “Hope they kept their old bulbs. Will need them. We tried LED lights. High failure rates, horrible light, and a constant hum that interfered with our shortwave radios.”“Ever try to use an LED to heat up a room or an egg incubatory?” another asked. “Or to give a room that nice yellow glow? Even the new ones still hum and interfere with shortwave receivers. Might as well live in a funeral parlor the way LED lights make some folks look.”last_img read more

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Suddenly Anyone Can Beat Rafael Nadal on Clay

In our sports coverage at FiveThirtyEight, we’ve referred several times to regression to the mean. It’s an unromantic truth about outstanding sports performances: They’re usually the product of skill and determination, but also a healthy dose of luck. We might expect the outstanding play to continue because of skill and determination, but the luck is just as likely to turn on its head as to persist.One sports figure, in one context, has upended the idea of regression to the mean more than just about anyone else over the past nine years: Rafael Nadal, when he plays tennis on clay. His losses have been so few and far between — and usually against one of the greats of all time, or while he’s hurt, or both — that they have seemed like the exceptions that prove the rule. From April 11, 2005, to April 17, 2014, Nadal went 260-9 on clay, winning 96.7 percent of his matches. That’s better than the best roughly nine-year runs on a surface of Nadal’s closest historical peers — Roger Federer or Pete Sampras on grass, Bjorn Borg on clay. Nadal may not be the best player in the group, but he’s probably the best player on any single surface in history.Then, suddenly, regression struck back — in a big way. Nadal, 27, has lost in consecutive weeks in clay-court quarterfinals, in tournaments he’s dominated, to good but not all-time-great opponents. Nadal still could run the table at the big remaining clay events in Madrid and Rome, and the French Open in Paris, but his footing on clay hasn’t looked so precarious since he was 18 years old.In the nine years until last week, Nadal had lost nine times on clay. Five times he lost to Roger Federer or Novak Djokovic, his top rivals and both all-time greats. Another loss came when Nadal’s foot was injured against Juan Carlos Ferrero, a former world No. 1 and 2003 French Open champion. Nadal’s only loss at the French Open, to Robin Soderling in 2009, was his last match before missing two months with a knee injury. He lost to Horacio Zeballos last year, in Nadal’s first tournament back after another seven months off-tour with knee problems. And he lost to Fernando Verdasco in 2012 in Madrid, the only tournament ever played on blue clay. After that loss, Nadal said: “This surface destabilizes the game. It is a completely different game, and I don’t want to take risks.”But this month, Nadal has no evident injuries, and he was playing on red clay. He was also facing opponents whom he’d previously dominated on the surface. Last Friday in Monte Carlo, where Nadal had been 50-2 in his career, he lost to David Ferrer after beating him 17 straight times on clay (a streak dating to before Nadal’s 19th birthday). And Friday, in Barcelona, where Nadal had been 42-1 in his career, he lost to Nicolas Almagro. Nadal had beaten Almagro in all 10 of their meetings, on all surfaces, while losing just two sets. Each loss came in a quarterfinal, a round in which Nadal had won 45 straight matches on clay.Twice in his nine-year run of dominance, Nadal lost on clay in consecutive tournaments: in 2009, to Soderling and Federer; and in 2011, twice to Djokovic. Immediately after each pair of losses, Nadal went on big clay-winning streaks: 37 straight matches after his 2009 rut, and 22 straight starting in 2011. He may need another such run to maintain his No. 1 ranking: His lead over Djokovic is fewer than 2,000 points, and Nadal has 4,000 points to defend in his next three tournaments. Djokovic has just 910 points to defend during that span. Last Friday, it looked as if Djokovic’s hot form was the biggest threat to Nadal’s top spot in the rankings. Now, with Djokovic nursing a wrist injury, the biggest wild card in the race for No. 1 is Nadal’s sudden regression toward the mean. read more

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Final Four bound womens soccer shuts out Georgetown

Ohio State defender Lauren Beachy’s first collegiate goal was a historic one for the Buckeyes. Beachy connected on a penalty shot in the 21st minute of play for a game-winning shot that sent the OSU women’s soccer team to its first Final Four appearance in program history after a 2-0 victory against Georgetown at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium. “I knew that it was my role to step up and do what I had to do,” Beachy said. “I knew it was my time.” Tiffany Cameron tacked on an insurance goal in the 53rd minute of play when she sprinted down the left side of the field and floated a long ball over Georgetown goalkeeper Jackie DesJardin. Forwards Lauren Granberg and Paige Maxwell both assisted on the goal, which was Cameron’s seventh of the season. “Georgetown was a tough team to prepare for,” OSU coach Lori Walker said. “They didn’t get here by accident. It was amazing to kind of watch as that second goal went in, you could see kind of a change.” The No. 3-seeded Buckeyes held on to their 2-0 lead for the final 37 minutes of action by dominating the ball throughout the second half, out-shooting the No. 4-seeded Hoyas 17-8. OSU goalkeeper Katie Baumgardner and the Buckeye defense recorded their third NCAA Tournament shutout. “Our defense comes to play every game,” Beachy said. “It’s a team concept. There’s not one of us who is an all-star. We all work together and we know each other’s strengths and weaknesses.” The Buckeyes will head to Cary, N.C., to play Notre Dame on Friday, with the winner advancing to the national championship game against the winner of Stanford and Boston College. Walker, who won a national championship as North Carolina’s starting goalkeeper in 1989, will focus on preparing her team to play on the biggest stage in collegiate women’s soccer. “I’m not going to lie. I mean, to go back to Cary and to be the first Tar Heel alum to make the Final Four is pretty special,” Walker said. “We’re going to do exactly what we’ve been doing. It really is just about being in the moment, and all we’ve got to do is be one goal better than the team we play on Friday night.” read more

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Barcelona plays down Malcoms lack of playing time

first_imgBarcelona are not bothered by Malcom’s lack of playing time this season as the club general manager Pep Segura revealed there is no problem with the Brazilian.Malcom, 21, is yet to start for the Spanish champions since his €41m move from Bordeaux this summer, making just two cameo appearances from the bench thus far.“There is no problem with Malcom,” Segura told an interview with Diario Sport.“He was added to the squad because he is young and because he has a lot of talent, this is a long season, so a lack of minutes right now is not an issue.David Villa, SpainQuiz: How much do you know about David Villa? Boro Tanchev – September 14, 2019 Time to test your knowledge about Spanish legendary forward David Villa.“Ernesto Valverde? He has the respect of the entire dressing room and the club, all decisions are taken together and there is no disharmony.“Ivan Rakitic? The club did not think about his sale, there was interest from a club but neither the player nor Barca wanted a sale.“Spanish football has the release clauses, no other league has such a binding arrangement so there is always a danger these can be triggered.”last_img read more

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Mariappa is an example to others Watford boss

first_imgFor the Hornets manager Javi Gracia, the 32-year-old is playing well in the English Premier League and has helped his team do good thingsEnglish defender Adrian Mariappa joined Watford for the second time in 2016, he previously played with the team from 2005 to 2012, but he hasn’t found a lot of playing time.In two years, the 32-year-old has played only in 35 matches, but lately, he’s been required to play more and more for his team.Daniel Fark, Norwich City, Premier LeagueDaniel Farke, From mid-table in the Championship to the Premier League Manuel R. Medina – September 14, 2019 Norwich City manager, Daniel Farke, has taken his team from the middle of the table in the English Championship to play with the big boys in the Premier League.“He’s one of the captains, he’s always an example for the rest of the players and he’s always ready,” manager Javi Gracia told the Watford Observer.“You can tell him ‘you are going to play right-back, you are going to play center back, you are going to play left-back’ and he’s always ready and always with a smile on his face.”“He’s always trying to do his best and trying to help everybody and for me, it’s a pleasure to have players like Mariappa,” he concluded.last_img read more

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