Honduras Should Return to OAS, U.S. Ambassador Says

first_imgBy Dialogo February 04, 2011 Manuel Celaya was dismissed from office for proposing meeting about the sovereignty regarding a possible presidential re-election which he would not be able to participate in and now the same Congress that dismissed him, approves him and no one says anything, it definitely wasn’t the proposition that was bothersome, but the person that made it, it is the double standard of the U.S.A. The United States has as an objective the return of Honduras to the Organization of American States (OAS) in the first half of the year, the American ambassador to that country, Hugo Llorens, declared on 1 February. President Porfirio Lobo’s administration, which is not recognized by the majority of countries in the region, “is a government friendly to the United States” and has done an “excellent” job, Llorens affirmed in a discussion with other ambassadors to Central America organized by the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. “Obviously, what remains to be done is the OAS,” the ambassador explained at the event. Honduras’s participation in the regional organization was suspended shortly after the coup d’état against then-president Manuel Zelaya in June 2009. The Central American country’s return to the OAS “remains a key objective. Our hope in the administration is that we can get Honduras back in the OAS … in the first half of the year,” he added. “Nothing will be gained by excluding the Honduran people,” he explained. President Lobo, who replaced Zelaya following controversial elections a year ago, “inherited just a very messy situation” in the political and economic spheres, but “I would argue that the Lobo government has been an excellent government” up to now, the ambassador said.last_img read more

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Vanessa Carlton Is Coming to Bay Shore

first_imgEmbed from Getty Images Grammy-nominated artist Vanessa Carlton is making Bay Shore her local stop on her national tour as she plans to take the stage March 9th at YMCA Boulton Center. She’s already been selling out venues in New York City, Philadelphia and Chicago.A lot has changed for Carlton since her hit song “A Thousand Miles” garnered her a Grammy nomination. She has moved from New York City to Nashville, married husband John McCauley (Deer Tick) and had a baby girl.Her last album Liberman, which came out in 2015, was critically acclaimed for showcasing Carlton’s continuing musical evolution. Her wistful vocals, poignant lyrics and simple instrumentation bring you intimately into her world and highlight a new side to this accomplished songwriter.Rolling Stone said that Carlton had “refined her voice as a songwriter” on Liberman, her fifth studio album, which was “turning heads” for good reason. The Boston Globe said her creation put her “in a better place, artistically.” Pitchfork agreed that the Liberman was “excellent on its own,” adding that her voice is the “key attraction on songs that register between low-key pop, rock and folk.” It noted that “a million years ago,” she had released “A Thousand Miles,” which was “the pop song that launched a generation of piano lessons.” Pitchfork applauded Liberman for being “raw, muted, refreshingly weird.”As she put it, “the whole message of the album is expressing a lot of philosophies about my life, peace, pain and happiness over the past ten years. I wanted this record to not only be very personal to me, but an expression of these ideas.”Carlton values the connection between the artist and the audience, even if it means the performer has to be at her most vulnerable on stage, because when it works, it’s worth it.This tour supports Carlton’s latest album Earlier Things Live, which just dropped in February. It honors her previous artistic work and features a compelling collection of live versions of her fans’ favorites like “A Thousand Miles” and “White Houses.” There’s also a special duet with John McCauley on the Deer Tick song “In Our Time.”Clearly, the time is right for Vanessa Carlton.She is slated to appear March 9 at YMCA Boulton Center for the Performing Arts, 37 West Main St., Bay Shore. boultoncenter.org Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York last_img read more

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Governor Wolf Touts Standardized Test Reduction Benefiting Students, Parents and Teachers

first_img Education,  Press Release,  Schools That Teach Harrisburg, PA – As students and teachers prepare for back to school, Governor Tom Wolf joined Secretary of Education Pedro Rivera and education advocates for a Schools that Teach event in Pittsburgh to announce students and teachers will spend at least 20 percent less time on the Pennsylvania System of School Assessment (PSSA) this school year.“Parents, teachers, and students have expressed concerns to me about the amount of time devoted to standardized tests,” said Governor Wolf at Pittsburgh Morrow PreK-8. “This reduction to the PSSA is an important step to giving students and teachers more time for learning while maintaining the accuracy of the test and reducing the burden on the kids.”“Our state is listening to parents about what we want in the education of our children,” said parent Cynthia-Grace Devine-Kepner.  “As a parent, I am thrilled with the reduction in the time commitment to the standardized test which can be stressful to many children. This change allows our kids to focus more on learning in the classroom which will help them to better prepare for success throughout their life.”“I am relieved that teachers’ voices were heard when we emphasized the pressures that are put on our students and teachers with the abundance of testing,” said Lorena Mitchell, a seventh-grade math teacher at Pittsburgh Colfax K-8. “A reduction of 20 percent of testing time could equate to two full days that I can use in my classroom to help maintain structure and focus on educating the students.”Beginning this school year, students and teachers in grades 3 through 8 will spend an average of 20 percent less time on statewide testing, and an even greater reduction – nearly 25 percent – for Pennsylvania’s youngest students. The Department has identified and removed two sections – one in math, one in English language arts – and additional questions from the science section, which could eliminate up to two full testing days for some schools.“We are grateful to both Governor Wolf and the Department of Education for their willingness to listen to the voices of educators from across the Commonwealth,” said Dr. Anthony Hamlet, Superintendent of the Pittsburgh Public Schools. “This decrease supports the steps we took as a District to reduce the amount of time our students in grades K-5 spend taking tests.”Currently, the PSSA exams take place during a three-week testing window identified by school districts and this schedule will apply to the shortened assessments in 2018. For test administration in 2019, the Department of Education anticipates shortening that window and moving it toward the end of the year to provide educators more time for curriculum instruction and to minimize disruptions to classes. The Department identified the PSSA changes during discussions with stakeholders for nearly a year when developing the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) Consolidated State Plan. The plan is a federal requirement to replace the No Child Left Behind Act.“The Department worked extensively with experts and stakeholders to make this change to the PSSAs and ensure that the exams are still accurate and maintain rigor,” said Secretary Rivera. “Although standardized tests are still required by the federal government and can provide meaningful information to schools and parents, we know that there are other equally important indicators of student success.”Governor Wolf has fought for Schools That Teach and has made investments in children and schools a top priority.Over the past three years, Pennsylvania has:Increased state funding by more than $800 million at all levels after devastating cuts in the past that is bringing teachers back to the classroom and restore educational program.Established a Fair funding formula to reduce the inequity in state support and taking Pennsylvania off a shameful list of states without a way to fairly fund their school. Pennsylvania was one of only three states in the nation without a fair funding formula.Doubled early childhood education access to provide nearly 8,800 more children access to Pre-K and Head Start programs to get a good start to their education.Increased graduation rates to among the highest in the nation for four-year high school from 85.5 percent in 2013-14 to 86.1 percent in 2015-16.Additionally, 42 percent more credentials were earned by students in industry-recognized programs andPennsylvania has become a national leader in STEM education, helping workers compete in the 21st century economy and build economic prosperity for working families.Also this year, the Department introduced the Future Ready PA Index, a new, public-facing school report card that expands the indicators used to measure performance, extends the comprehensive approach to ensuring student and school success. The Index will place additional emphasis on academic growth, evaluation of school climate through a robust chronic absenteeism measure, attention to both four-year and extended-year graduation rates, and assessments of postsecondary readiness.Details about the PSSA reduction and the Future Ready PA Index are available in Pennsylvania’s ESSA Consolidated State Plan, on PDE’s website. The plan is open for public comment until August 31, 2017. August 17, 2017 Governor Wolf Touts Standardized Test Reduction Benefiting Students, Parents and Teacherscenter_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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