Bill Kreutzmann And Mickey Hart Hang Out By 710 Ashbury During San Fran Visit [Watch]

first_img“I’ve been here since they were here,” explains neighbor Tsvi Strauch just a few days ago, standing at the legendary front steps of 710 Ashbury beside former residents Bill Kreutzmann and Mickey Hart. “They were excellent neighbors,” he responds when somebody asks about the The Grateful Dead members, just hours before they played a free show at the Fillmore in San Francisco with Dead & Company.Full Video/Review: Dead & Company Heat Up The Historic Fillmore In San FranciscoWatch the full clip below, courtesy of Gallery 683:last_img

Read More »

Spafford Welcomes Greensky Bluegrass’ Dave Bruzza For RHCP Cover [Full Show Audio]

first_imgSpafford continued their three-night run in Colorado with a stop at The Aggie in Fort Collins on Friday night. The Arizona-bred four-piece continues to gain momentum as they test the waters in new markets, delivering their signature grooves and extended jams to packed houses across the U.S.. Friday night’s show was yet another testament to their growing success, as the two-set performance was highlighted by the band’s tight improvisation, unique tributes, and undeniable collective energy.Spafford Packs The Ogden Theatre On Night One Of Colorado Run [Photos]With most of the band’s songs pushing the limits between 10 and 15 minute jams, even their covers felt like originals. Sandwiched between their original tunes in the first set, Spafford delivered a heartfelt cover of “You Don’t Know How It Feels” by the late great Tom Petty. Toward the end of the second set, Greensky Bluegrass guitarist Dave Bruzza joined the band for bluegrass-tinged, knee-slapping version of the Red Hot Chili Peppers‘ “Soul To Squeeze”. You can watch a video of “Soul To Squeeze” below:Listen to fan-recorded audio of the full show below, courtesy of teamikoiko:The soundboards for Friday night’s show will soon be available, as well as most Spafford shows, on nugs.net here. Tonight, the band heads to Globe Hall in Denver to close their three-night Colorado throwdown in style.Spafford Releases Live 53-Minute Improv Studio Session And More [Pro-Shot Video]Spafford Welcomes The Disco Biscuits’ Aron Magner For Mad World Cover At Hulaween [Video]Setlist: Spafford | The Aggie | Fort Collins, CO | 11/10/17I: It’s A Bunch > Mind’s Unchained, You Don’t Know How It Feels*, Slip And Squander, Windmill, All InII: Virtual Bean Dip > Backdoor Funk, Electric Taco Stand, Soul To Squeeze^, America, The RepriseE: Shake You Loose, Galisteo Way*Tom Petty^With Dave Bruzza | RHCP[photo via Spafford Facebook page]last_img read more

Read More »

An Rx for the T

first_imgDante’s “Inferno” has nine circles of hell. Many frustrated Boston residents say their own equivalent consists of five color-coded subway lines of ignominy known as the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA). After last winter’s record snowfalls caused equipment failures that forced system-wide shutdowns and major, near-daily service delays, a host of expert panels, consultants, and government officials pushed for immediate and future reforms to get the perennially debt-ridden agency back on track. Changes to the T’s financial oversight and upper management were made, and new equipment was purchased, but the troubles are far from over. The long-planned Green Line extension into Somerville and Medford stalled and may be canceled after it was revealed in August that cost overruns could exceed $1 billion. Late-night T service, which began in 2014, has failed to attract enough riders to justify the $14 million annual loss and is likely to get the axe. Just last week, riders on the Red Line, which passes under Cambridge, endured several days of delays because of signal problems, rider injuries including a fatality, and a train that sailed through several stops with riders aboard but no operator at the controls.Charles Chieppo is an Innovations in American Government Fellow at Harvard Kennedy School’s Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation. A veteran Massachusetts public policy adviser, consultant, and T gadfly, Chieppo has issued a new analysis identifying key issues plaguing the system and recommending changes. The Gazette spoke with Chieppo about the challenges facing the T, the progress so far, and what’s still needed as winter nears again.GAZETTE: Many studies calling for systemic reform of the MBTA have been done in recent years, and yet little has improved. If anything, service is worse, and costs are higher now. What prompted this analysis?CHIEPPO: The reason I really wanted to do it was because now, for once, there is a real focus on these issues, especially with the winter coming again. People are thinking about the T, are thinking about trying to make it work. We’ve got this finance and management control board, so I feel like it’s one time when maybe we can actually focus some attention on it. It’s kind of the “last best chance to really get something done,” is the best way to put it.GAZETTE: Ridership is at an all-time high, and yet costs persistently outpace revenues. You cite rail line expansion, the para-transit service for disabled passengers known as The Ride, and bus maintenance as very costly areas that ought to be reformed. What are the problems?CHIEPPO: Boston is not one of the faster-growing metropolitan areas in the country. And yet, over 25 years, the MBTA has been far and away the fastest-growing transit system in the country. That’s fine if you’ve got a way to pay for it — to build the new stuff and to maintain it and to operate it — but we did it all on a credit card, essentially. No one thing is responsible for the way the T is today, but I would say, certainly, uncontrolled expansion is first among equals in terms of what has gotten us here.Greenbush, extending several commuter rail lines, the Green Line extension, the Silver Line: I’m by no means saying that all of these were bad projects. It’s just it was all done with no funding mechanism. That was a huge problem. What we need to do is to stop until we can get this $7.3 billion maintenance backlog under control. Going forward, when we take on expansion, it needs to be not just based on “Can we afford to build the line?” It needs to be based on “Can we afford to build it, can we afford to operate it (because these all lose money), and can we afford to maintain it?” We don’t want to get back into this robbing Peter to pay Paul to build new lines, and taking the money from maintenance.With The Ride, when the Executive Office of Health and Human Services can provide the same service for basically a third of the cost, there is a problem. And I think there’s clearly a problem with the model that the T uses to provide those services, which is three statewide contracts that create incentives for the contractors to do as many trips as possible, which means never doubling up on passengers who may be going from the same place to the same place, that kind of thing. If they’re doing essentially the same thing for a third of the cost, the T has got to take a look at changing the way they’re providing that service, because it certainly seems to me that there are serious savings you can achieve there without cutting the service or creating more of a problem for the really vulnerable people who are using it.Bus maintenance: We’ve got this opportunity to take advantage of a three-year moratorium on the Pacheco law, which makes it very, very hard to privatize anything. Gov. [Charlie] Baker said, and I think he’s right, that nobody is looking to do wholesale privatization at the T, but when you’ve got one discrete service that costs a lot of money and that, when compared to the five transit systems that are most like the T, essentially costs twice as much as those systems do to maintain buses, then you’ve got a fiduciary responsibility to see if we can get a better deal by contracting out the bus maintenance. Frankly, I suspect that we can.GAZETTE: How is it that T bus maintenance costs per mile rank highest among 452 other systems nationwide, and 92 percent higher than the average of five peer cities?CHIEPPO: The T has about 60 percent more maintenance employees per vehicle revenue mile — that’s a typical measure in the transit industry — than these other five agencies, and I think that’s a big reason for it. Other studies have shown that the maintenance work that the T does is not terribly effective. [A study by Gregory Sullivan,] the former inspector general, a couple years ago showed they were doing a lot more maintenance, and yet they had twice as many breakdowns as the Minneapolis-St. Paul bus system, which was a good comparison because not only is it the same size as the T in terms of the bus fleet, but it’s also a similar, horrific climate.GAZETTE: We know the trains are decades old, but are the buses so old that they can’t be repaired?CHIEPPO: Over the decade leading up to 2013, the T’s buses were almost exactly the same age as the buses in the other five comparable [city transit] agencies. In 2013 they were, on average, about 40 weeks older. That wouldn’t account for maintenance costs being nearly twice as high.GAZETTE: You say fares have to go up. What increase would realistically reduce the repair backlog without driving riders to ride-sharing and private services like Uber, Lyft, or Bridj, or getting back in their cars?CHIEPPO: When you get to the financial situation that the T is in, there are no good options. You are forced to make really bad choices, and this is an example of that. We can’t do big fare increases because, you’re right, we don’t want to push people out. We’re talking about 5 percent every two years, something like that.The other thing that I’ve advocated looking at is low-income fare discounts. This is something the smart-card technology has now made possible. There’s a program that started last winter in Seattle, and I’m very eager to get some real numbers on that. And what they’re doing is if you’re below 200 percent of the federal poverty level, you get a half-price fare. I don’t know if we can afford it. The reason I’m very interested in looking into it is because one of the basic ideas behind transit is to promote economic growth. A big part of economic growth is providing a way for people of limited means to get to jobs and to have an opportunity to climb the economic ladder. Now the problem, in the T’s case, the T has to get that money back. The T can’t afford to give that money away, so the whole thing comes down to “Can you make the service good enough so more affluent people will stay on it?” And to me that question is all about customer service.GAZETTE: You propose the T adopt a “customer-service culture.” How can that be accomplished when the existing management and staff have never operated that way, and with a union that’s quite powerful and resistant to change?CHIEPPO: The T has to undergo total cultural transformation. It really has to be a service that is all about customer service because, you’re right, it has to compete with Uber and Bridj and Lyft, and it has to provide the service that’s good enough to attract, or at least keep, more affluent people using it. You don’t want a system that is a last resort. You’ve got to make the service reliable; you’ve got to make it comfortable. This is why I really am pushing for this idea that you have a set of metrics related to the customer experience, [like] on-time performance. This is going to take time.This is not a problem that Gov. Baker will have enough time to completely solve, even if he wins a second term. It’s going to take new management; it’s going to take public pressure; it’s going to take these customer-service metrics being put online; you’re going to need some legislative changes so that you can change, for example, some of the abuses in the pension system, so that you don’t have a system where people have an incentive to just hang on and not do anything. You’re going to have to have real consequences. You’re going to have to have a situation in which there’s a relationship between job security and compensation and performance. You’ve got have something to provide that motivation for people to change the way they do things.GAZETTE: What changes should/can lawmakers make to initiate meaningful reform, and what’s been preventing them from taking this on before now? And does the business community need to lean on state officials to get things moving?CHIEPPO: I started writing about the T and the problems it was having financially and where it was headed in 2000. Nobody paid attention, which was really frustrating. But now I think attention is being drawn to these specific needs. We’ve had some real important changes with the finance and management control board, with the exemption from the Pacheco law. Legislators need to look at some serious changes to the MBTA pension fund, which is just a mess. At the very least, you’ve got to make it completely public. By some strange quirk, it’s considered a private trust, so we don’t know a lot of what’s really going on there; we just know it’s failing financially. It is a black box. The right thing to do is to create a plan, and this is difficult to do financially, in which new employees transfer to the state pension fund, and over time we simply phase the MBTA pension fund out.I think we’re making progress. All the moves that have been made recently are right on. I think the real challenge is going to come over time because the fact of the matter is that we’re in such a deep hole here that it’s going to take a lot of hard decisions over an extended period of time. And the issue becomes one of maintaining the kind of political will we have right now over an extended period. And that’s really hard to do. [In terms of business pressure,] if you look at the estimates for the lost productivity last winter, it was staggering. In a way, that’s good because what that means is that the pressure won’t let up. The pressure to fix this will continue and will be ongoing, and that’s what’s required here.This interview has been edited for clarity and length.last_img read more

Read More »

Getting his teeth into the community

first_imgThe center serves a large number of recent immigrants from Central America. During his externship, Lisann spoke in Spanish to better connect with patients. He also developed techniques to build children’s confidence once they’re in his chair, like counting down and focusing on deep breathing before Lisann uses a needle to administer a shot of anesthetic. He tells Diego the sensation will be like a quick mosquito bite and asks him to give a thumbs-up to let him know he’s OK.Fourth-year HSDM students like Lisann complete a community-based general dentistry externship to expand their perspective of oral health delivery systems, and build on their medical and dental knowledge by providing care in a community setting. Besides Charles River Community Health Center, other HSDM externship sites include Boston Health Care for the Homeless, Brookside Community Health Center, Community Health Center of Cape Cod, The Dimock Center, Edith Nourse Rogers Memorial Veterans Hospital, Harvard Street Neighborhood Health Center, Lynn Community Health Center, Mattapan Community Health Center, and the VA Boston Healthcare System.Harvard School of Dental Medicine student Ryan Lisann with his young patient, Diego.Once on site, students collaborate with community dentists to develop treatment plans and treat underserved populations. HSDM students spend 12 weeks in each externship, twice the typical six-week externship at other dental schools, which gives them time to build a closer connection to the patients, dentists, and staff at the sites.“We love working with HSDM students,” said dental director Janice Cho at Charles River Health. (She is also a lecturer at the School.) “We look forward to having the externs rotate through the health center as they bring a positive energy and provide compassionate care to patients who need it the most,” she said.Charles River Community Health Center serves the communities of Allston, Brighton, and Waltham by providing comprehensive, coordinated care. The center’s roots are in Allston-Brighton, where it was first established as the Joseph M. Smith Community Health Center more than 35 years ago. Dental services have been offered since the beginning, and HSDM students have been part of dental care at the center for nearly 20 years.“The aim of Charles River Community Health is to provide a dental safety net experience that externs hopefully enjoy, learn and grow from,” said Cho.“There’s such a great need for community dental care in the U.S.,” Lisann said. “This experience has taught me so much and opened my eyes to areas where I can have the most impact.” For Harvard School of Dental Medicine (HSDM) student Ryan Lisann, completing one of the last requirements of his four-year D.M.D. program — a three-month externship at Charles River Community Health Center in Brighton — was an experience that will shape his career.“I’m really passionate about education and wanting to work with kids, so getting to work in a community health setting and treating pediatric patients confirmed the path I want to take,” Lisann said.“Seeing patients arrive at a clinic, particularly young children, with a mouth full of cavities is incredibly disheartening. It’s clear that education is part of the solution.”Lisann hopes to use early childhood dental education to address disparities in oral health and fill gaps in care to lessen the need for fillings. After graduation, while his peers go on to residency programs and dental practices around the country, Lisann plans to work part time and pursue a master’s degree in education before applying for a pediatric dentistry residency.On a recent Friday at Charles River Community Health Center, Lisann was treating 10-year-old Diego. Speaking reassuringly in Spanish to the young Venezuelan, Lisann explained the procedure he would be using to fill two cavities.“The biggest thing is building trust,” Lisann said. “Many kids we treat here are seeing a dentist for the first time.” “Seeing patients arrive at a clinic, particularly young children, with a mouth full of cavities is incredibly disheartening. It’s clear that education is part of the solution.” — Ryan Lisannlast_img read more

Read More »

Traditional trimmings

first_imgThoughts of Thanksgiving dinner most often turn to turkey. “Last year’s bird was so dry. Perhaps we should try frying it this year.” But, there’s more to a memorable holiday meal than just the meat in the middle. Many family traditions are found in the trimmings. For as long as anyone close to him can remember, Charles Fleming has opened the doors of his Atlanta home to family, neighbors and friends on Thanksgiving morning in what he dubs his “Family, Friends and Outcasts Feast.” By his estimation, it’s the dressing that makes or breaks a holiday meal. Fleming’s oyster dressing is legendary in his circle of friends. “My grandparents on my father’s side were from Pensacola, Fla., so oyster dressing was their family tradition,” Fleming said. While many Southerners swear by traditional cornbread dressing, along the Gulf coast oyster dressing is a staple on holiday tables. “You definitely want fresh oysters if you can get them,” he said. A dash of salt, pepper, cayenne, sage and basil give Flemings dressing flavor. “And, don’t forget the Cajun trinity: celery, bell pepper and onions,” he added. “You have to start with a good French baguette that you let go stale and then cube,” he said. The bread holds the dressing together and soaks up all the rich flavors. For other’s, holiday meals are a time to enjoy special twists on everyday vegetables. From green bean casseroles to corn puddings, there’s no shortage of tempting treats to try. “I never ate a sweet potato I didn’t like,” said Wayne McLaurin, a retired UGA Cooperative Extension horticulture specialist who now makes his home on the Mississippi coast.“Growing up with the greatest cook in the world, we learned early to eat pretty much everything. In the blending of French, Italian, Creole and Cajun, though, there was always true ‘Southern cooking,’ which involved sweet potatoes,” he said.“Mamma fixed them french fried for breakfast with cinnamon and brown sugar. For other meals, she baked, boiled or candied them with marshmallows. She made mouth-watering pies and sweet-potato chips. We ate many cold sweet potatoes, too, as a snack after school,” he remembered.But his favorite, often reserved for special occasions, was the sweet-potato surprise. “Mamma made them from baked sweet potatoes she mashed with spices and rolled into golf-ball-size pieces,” he said. “Poking her thumb into the ball made just enough space to insert one or two miniature marshmallows.” “Then, she reformed the ball, rolled it in fresh-grated coconut and chopped pecans and baked it until the outside was crusty and the marshmallow melted inside,” he said.The names “sweet potato” and “yam” have been used interchangeably over the years. “We called our sweet potatoes yams because the variety we grew was the Puerto Rican type that was moist-fleshed and very sweet,” McLaurin said. By any name, the sweet tubers are rich with Vitamin A, provide a high-energy staple to many diets and are instrumental in preventing childhood blindness in developing countries. And, they are an important Georgia crop. Tift, Tattnall and Colquitt are Georgia’s largest sweet potato-producing counties, growing more than half of the state’s 684-acre crop.Including a colorful, nutritional mix of locally grown vegetables in your holiday menu is a healthy choice and good for Georgia’s economy, too. Georgia farmers grow more than 150,000 acres of vegetables in more than 40 different varieties. Just over 90 percent of them are sold at fresh markets. Georgia-grown vegetables had a 2008 farm-gate value of $850 million. Holiday meals provide the perfect setting to celebrate heritage, to honor loved ones with traditional recipes and to try new trimmings to dress up the tried-and-true.last_img read more

Read More »

ShopRite and MyWebGrocer Launch Social Networking Site for Retail Grocery: ShopRite.MyBaby.com

first_imgColchester, VT November 5, 2007Life for new parents just got a little easier, and customer communication just improved for the customers of ShopRite supermarkets. MyWebGrocer of Colchester, VT and ShopRite of New Jersey announced the arrival of ShopRite.MyBaby.com, a grocery social networking site for parents. ShopRite.MyBaby.com is a place where parents can organize, share, discuss, and find things to do with their kids. ShopRite.MyBaby.com was launched October 31, 2007.Rebecca Roose, Marketing and Account Manager for MyWebGrocer, said, ShopRite.MyBaby.com is about building bridges. As anyone whos been a parent knows, information and advice are critical, especially when you have an infant, so were building an e-bridge for parents to use with each other to share information. In addition, were building a bridge between these parents and ShopRite, who can use the site to let parents know what child-oriented specials are available at their online store. And were building a bridge between consumer products goods companies (CPGs) who advertise on this site, and these customers. ShopRite.MyBaby.com fosters a genuine back-and-forth dialogue between the CPGs and the parents who use and rate, their products.MyBaby.com differs from other parenting social networking sites by aggregating a full range of information and networking possibilities for parents, such as advice, blogging, photo and video sharing and organizing, personalized homepages, event listings and grocery shopping.Vice President of Sales, Curt Alpeter added, We are excited to have ShopRite, with over 200 store locations, join the MyBaby social networking platform. ShopRite.MyBaby.com will drive loyalty and conversations within the affluent Northeast.By providing a forum for parents to meet and share, ShopRite.MyBaby.com helps us engage our customers in the all-important dialogue about raising healthy kids, stated Joe Colalillo, chairman and CEO of Wakefern Food Corporation, the marketing and distribution arm for ShopRite. The site gives us one more chance to provide information and convenience to our customers. Some facts about social networking:” Outside of search engines, Social Networking sites account for more Web traffic than any other type of Web sites.” Social networking sites such as Google’s You Tube and News Corp.’s MySpace.com have begun displacing portals such as Yahoo as the new home base for Internet users.” Two-thirds of all U.S. economic activity is influenced by shared opinions about a product, brand, or service” Linked consumers are like-minded, and like-minded consumers tend to buy the same products.Some facts about the buying power of moms: ” Moms control 1.7 trillion dollars in US spending annually.” Moms control 80% of all household spending.” Moms on average spend more time online then watching TV, reading magazines and listening to the radio combined.For more information about ShopRites social networking site, please go to ShopRite.MyBaby.com About ShopRite: ShopRite supermarkets are members of Wakefern Food Corporation, a retailer-owned cooperative with stores throughout New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Connecticut, and Delaware. ShopRite serves more than 4 million customers each week. A long time supporter of community efforts, ShopRite has been named the New Jersey Corporate Philanthropist of the Year by the Community Foundation of New Jersey. Americas Second Harvest Food Bank Network also has recognized ShopRite as the Grocery Distributor of the year for its ShopRite Partners In Caring program, a year-round initiative dedicated to fighting hunger in the communities served by ShopRite. Since its inception, ShopRite Partners In Caring has donated $15 million to more than 1,400 charities.About MyWebGrocer: MyWebGrocer has been helping grocery retailers find profit in the online shopping world since 1999. Based in Colchester, Vermont, MyWebGrocer is the industry leader in providing web services solutions to 80 grocery chains such as Lowes, ShopRite, Brookshire Grocery, King Kullen, and Heinens. “We Make Online Shopping Work” is the company’s slogan. Founded by Rich Tarrant, MyWebGrocer institutes e-commerce programs, provides web site design, hosting, creates e-mail campaigns, and furnishes online circulars and recipes for more than 80 leading grocery chains. For more information please visit http://www.mywebgrocer.com(link is external)last_img read more

Read More »

Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Vermont to Bring Renowned Wellness Expert to Department of Health Conference

first_imgBlue Cross and Blue Shield of Vermont to Bring Renowned Wellness Expert to Department of Health ConferenceBurlington, VT – The Vermont Department of Health will hold its 2008 Work Site Wellness Conference, part of the “Fit & Healthy Vermonters Program,” on Tuesday, October 7 at the Hilton Hotel in Burlington. The appearance of noted wellness expert Michael Samuelson as conference keynote speaker is made possible by major sponsor Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Vermont.Samuelson is President and CEO for The Health & Wellness Institute (HWI), affiliated with Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Rhode Island. Samuelson is widely published and is a frequent director, consultant, and advisor to numerous prestigious boards and organizations including The Men’s Health Network, The Business Innovation Factory, The HERO Forum for Optimal Employee Health, The Lance Armstrong Foundation and The Department of Defense.A graduate of the University of Michigan with a MA degree in Education, Samuelson has appeared on over 200 television and radio stations throughout North America and has been interviewed by numerous print publications including Newsweek, USA Today, and The Wall Street Journal. His work in the area of behavior change, health economics and healthcare consumer advocacy has been featured on the ABC News program, 20/20, The CBS Morning Show, CNN, and MSNBC.Governor James Douglas will recognize worksite wellness “best practices” by awarding the 2008 Governor’s Council on Physical Fitness and Sports Worksite Wellness Awards. Other speakers include Vermont Commissioner of Health Wendy Davis, MD, and representatives of winning organizations who will share their secrets.For more information about the program, call 802-863-7606 or visit http://healthvermont.gov/family/(link is external)fit/worksitewellness.aspx. Registration is $75 per person or $50 per person for members of the Vermont Human Resources Association or employees from a work site that applied for a 2008 Governor’s Council on Physical Fitness and Sports Work Site Wellness Award. The deadline for registration isSeptember 23, 2008.Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Vermont is the state’s oldest and largest private health insurer, providing coverage for about 180,000 Vermonters. It employs over 350 Vermonters at its headquarters in Berlin and branch office in Williston, and offers group and individual health plans to Vermonters. More information about Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Vermont is available on the Internet at www.bcbsvt.com(link is external). Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Vermont is an independent corporation operating under a license with the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association, an association of independent Blue Cross and Blue Shield Plans.(End)last_img read more

Read More »

The Shores assisted living community opens in Shelburne

first_imgThe Lodge at Shelburne Bay, located in Shelburne, Vermont, has announced its second expansion in 10 years, the opening of the Shores Assisted Living community. The Shores Assisted Living is a 20 million dollar, 90 bed state-of-the-art project. The 100,000 square foot, fire proof and environmentally friendly building consists of 76 brand new, all-inclusive rental apartments for seniors. The project will create more than 80 new jobs. Amenities include: On-site physical therapy, therapeutic pool, theater, fitness center and much more.Interior decorating at The Shores Assisted Living was created by renowned New York interior design firm Brett Design, Inc. Architects for the project were Weimann Lamphere Architects, located in Colchester, Vermont. The Bullrock Corporation was the builder and also owns and manages the project.The new community shares a campus with the existing Lodge at Shelburne Bay. The Lodge at Shelburne Bay offers residents all inclusive rental options that include 90 Independent Living apartments and a Memory Care program.  The Lodge at Shelburne Bay was also built by the Bullrock Corporation in 1999.Bullrock Corporation, its owner and CEO Gregg Beldock and affiliates, have been in the construction management and real estate development business since the early 1980s. In 1999 Bullrock Corporation entered the senior living category. Properties also include The Lodge at Shelburne Bay’s sister community-The Lodge at Otter Creek located in Middlebury, Vermont built in 2008.last_img read more

Read More »

Four bidders vying for New York’s first offshore wind contract

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Reuters:New York State said on Thursday it had received proposals from Norway’s Equinor and three joint ventures to build its first offshore wind power park of at least 800-megawatt capacity.The three joint ventures are Bay State Wind, between Danish Orsted and Eversource Energy; Atlantic Shores Offshore Wind, consisting of France’s EDF and Shell; and Vineyard Wind, between Copenhagen Infrastructure Partners and Avangrid Renewables, the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) said in a statement.New York state closed bidding for the park on Thursday, a part of its push to increase renewable energy production, and will choose a supplier in the spring. “The response to New York’s inaugural solicitation for 800 megawatts or more of offshore wind is unprecedented and historic,” NYSERDA said.Proposals include projects to build up to 1,200 MW of capacity, which if constructed would be the largest offshore wind project in the United States, it added.Equinor, which won a U.S. federal auction in 2016 to lease 80,000 acres south of Long Island, said the area could potentially allow it to build an offshore wind park of up to 2,000 MW.NYSERDA said the first offshore wind solicitation should help advance New York State’s plans to reach a goal of building 9,000 MW of offshore wind capacity by 2035.More: Equinor, 3 JVs vie for offshore wind power park in New York Four bidders vying for New York’s first offshore wind contractlast_img read more

Read More »

A luxury Queenslander was the home most potential buyers were keen on

first_img60 Laidlaw Pde, East Brisbane. Picture: realestate.com.auIt is on 754sq m block of land and is surrounded by established gardens. There are city views from wrap around verandas. It has an open plan living area, dining and a Hampton’s style kitchen.More from newsMould, age, not enough to stop 17 bidders fighting for this home2 hours agoBuyers ‘crazy’ not to take govt freebies, says 28-yr-old investor2 hours ago60 Laidlaw Pde, East Brisbane. Picture: realestate.com.auA home at 61 Knightsbridge Parade East, Sovereign Islands, listed for $2,980,000 was the second most viewed property on realestate.com.au in Queensland this week. 60 Laidlaw Pde, East Brisbane. Picture: realestate.com.auThe home, which will be auctioned on September 7, has five bedrooms, and is one of only 22 on that stretch of the river. 36 Springsure St, RuncornThe four-bedroom home is within walking distance of the Warrigal Square Shopping Centre. The main bedroom has a walk through wardrobe, ensuite and a balcony.New Farm rounded out the top five this week, with a home at 89 Oxlade Drive, attracting plenty of attention. 312 Teewah Beach Rd, Noosa North Shore.It has uninterrupted 180 degree ocean views from Noosa National Park and Main Beach north to Double Island Point. 312 Teewah Beach Rd, Noosa North Shore.The two-storey home has an office, three bathrooms and two powder rooms.The fourth most viewed home was at 36 Springsure St, Runcorn which was after offers of more than $599,000.center_img 61 Knightsbridge Pde East, Sovereign Islands.The four-bedroom, three-year-old home has water views. There is 33 metres of water frontage, a pontoon to dock large vessels and an outdoor entertainment terrace. The home has a timber deck, pool and spa, gym and tiered cinema room.The third most popular property online this week was a house at 312 Teewah Beach Rd, Noosa North Shore. The five-bedroom home, known as Laguna, is on 31 ha of beach front land which is surrounded by nature reserves and national park. 60 Laidlaw Pde, East Brisbane. Picture: realestate.com.auA BEAUTIFUL Queenslander at 60 Laidlaw Pde, East Brisbane was the most popular listing on line in Queensland this week.More potential property buyers checked out the home on realestate.com.au than any other in Queensland this week. 89 Oxlade Drive, New Farm.The modern four-bedroom home is already under contract. The newly built luxury home has a fully automated security system and internal lift access to all levels. The four bathrooms have floor to ceiling travertine tile.last_img read more

Read More »