Arcade Fire Finished Recording New Album, Set Sights On Major Tour

first_imgIn a recent interview with Red Bull Poland, Arcade Fire drummer Jerry Gara revealed that the band has completed the recording of their follow-up album to 2013’s Reflektor. However, the timeline for the release is not something that Gara could elaborate on, since the final mix is still being worked on:“The album should come out this year. At this stage we are still mixing and trying to decide which songs will end up on the record, because we’ve recorded more than we need. But we’re almost finished. I don’t know when it’ll come out, I hope soon. I know we’re a popular band, but we always stick to the same rule; we record until we feel that the music is ready.”Gara did reveal the the group may be preparing for a massive two-year tour, “for obvious reasons [Arcade Fire] is a very important part of my plans, and a quite mysterious one. I don’t know where we’re going to play, I don’t know when we start, or when we finish. From my perspective, it looks like Arcade Fire starts in April and finish around April 2019.”This is certainly news that should excite fans of the Canadian rockers. The group will also release The Reflektor Tapes / Live at Earls Court documentary DVD on January 27th.[via Consequence of Sound]last_img read more

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IDEA Center promotes entrepreneurship

first_imgNotre Dame’s IDEA Center, located on the third floor of Innovation Park on Angela Boulevard, is home to a plethora of whiteboards and colorful markers, Google-esque decor and people with a passion for innovation. A resource for anyone affiliated with Notre Dame, the IDEA center is transforming the way students think about entrepreneurship. The IDEA Center is one of the many offices in Innovation Park — a building and community dedicated to collaboration and business acceleration. Beyond the IDEA Center, the other Innovation Park residents are growing companies that are committed to meeting needs in their respective markets. Karen Slaggert, the director of student entrepreneurship, has been leading the efforts to expand opportunities for students within the IDEA Center and Innovation Park as a whole. In the IDEA Center, Slaggert said there are countless resources for students in any stage of the thought development process — from the inception of an idea to launching a successful company. The Center calls the process of surrounding students with resources part of the “commercialization pipeline.”As with any business development process, funding is an essential resource in the Center’s business-acceleration model. “We have one more pitch event this year and I think at that point we will have given away about $50,000 to our students to work on their ideas,” Slaggert said. Slaggert said one of the most prominent opportunities to gain access to funding is the McCloskey Business Competition, a competition for Notre Dame students, faculty and alumni. Slaggert said that this year the competition will offer about $400,000 in cash and prizes: $256,000 of which is cash prizes, and the rest is in-kind offers — donated services from various alumni and companies. “The prizes are great, but the real value of the McCloskey Competition is getting help and mentoring, judges who evaluate at different stages of the competition and give them feedback,” Slaggert said. Slaggert emphasized the importance of networking and alumni relations, both of which are at the core of the IDEA center programing. “The one thing about Notre Dame people is that they are always willing to help. They are always willing to give back,” Slaggert said. The IDEA Center connections proved to be especially valuable for seniors Luke Maillie and Andrew Munch, Notre Dame students who have developed wearable technology to detect the damage level of UV rays at any given moment. Slaggert said the members of the family behind Radio Flyer — the makers of the little red wagon — are Notre Dame alumni who heard of Maillie and Munch’s creation. Instantly, they said they would love to work with the product.“One thing that resonates with students on this campus, we believe, is that even though you might say ‘I’m not an inventor, I’m not an entrepreneur,‘ it’s safe to say that most students on this campus want to make the world a better place. They want to bring about change, and entrepreneurship and innovation is the way to do that,” Slaggert said. In order to increase exposure to the entrepreneurship process, Slaggert has also been heavily emphasizing internship opportunities in Innovation Park as a whole. “Just in the IDEA center, we have hired just about 60 [interns] since last summer,” she said. “I would love to double that by placing students with other startups in the building, connecting students to other students to work on their ideas.” To this end, the IDEA Center is creating a database to connect students with the internships they are interested in pursuing.“We are going to have a platform so students who want internships can post their resumes and indicate which of those groups they would be willing to intern with,” Slaggert said. ” … Once they indicate what their preferences are, their resume will be available to everyone who is hiring.” Overall, Slaggert stressed that all students should look into IDEA Center and Innovation Park opportunities. “I would want students to know that they have a place they can come where countless people will do anything they can to help them figure things out,” she said. “We can help. Just come check it out.” Tags: entrepreneurship, IDEA Center, Innovation Park, Internshipslast_img read more

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David Yazbek, Hal Prince & More Tapped for ATC’s 2015-16 Season

first_img View Comments These Paper Bullets! Related Shows The 2015-16 Atlantic Theater season—the company’s 30th anniversary—will include the world premiere of David Yazbek and Itamar Moses’ The Band’s Visit. Harold Prince will direct the musical adaptation of the 2007 film next spring. The season will also feature two New York debuts, including These Paper Bullets! with music by Green Day’s Billie Joe Armstrong, and a world premiere from Dominique Morisseau.The season kicks off this fall in the Linda Gross Theater with a revival of Cloud Nine by Caryl Churchill. Set in British colonial Africa and late ‘70s London, the play explores a hypothetical modern society—one where the characters who have aged only 25 years since the Victorian era. James Macdonald will direct the production.Jackson Gay directs These Paper Bullets!, which premiered at the Yale Repertory Theatre in 2014. The show is a modern adaptation of Much Ado About Nothing, adapted by Rolin Jones and featuring songs by Armstrong. It follows four Liverpool band members (the Quartos—get it?) who have seven days to find true love and cut an album—as their former drummer attempts to destroy them. Think the Beatles meet the Bard. Performances will begin in November in the Linda Gross Theater.Morisseau’s Skeleton Crew will begin performances in January 2016 at Atlantic Stage 2. The drama marks the final installment of her Detroit trilogy, following Paradise Blue and Detroit ‘67; it tells the story of a makeshift family of workers at the last remaining auto plant in the city.With music and lyrics by Yazbek and a book by Moses, The Band’s Visit follows an Egyptian Police Band who, after a mix-up at the Israeli border, are sent to a remote village in the desert instead of their expected concert venue. They are quickly welcomed by the locals, and form an unlikely and unexpected relationship. The tuner, which will premiere next spring at the Linda Gross Theater, is directed by 21-time Tony Award winner Prince.The season concludes with the New York premiere of The Purple Light of Joppa Illinois. Written by Adam Rapp, the play follows a Kentucky recluse who is forced to confront his tragic past when two teenagers arrive at his duplex doorstep. The play will run starting in June 2016 at Atlantic Stage 2.Additional information for the five productions, including cast and creative team, will be announced at a later date. Show Closed This production ended its run on Jan. 10, 2016last_img read more

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Cool Cukes.

first_imgWhether you grow your own fruits and vegetables or not, summeris a great time for fresh produce. To get the best flavor, Universityof Georgia experts say you need to know which fruits and vegetablesto refrigerate (and which not to).Refrigerating some produce (tomatoes, papayas, mangos, avocados,bananas, potatoes, sweet potatoes and onions) hurts their flavor,said Elizabeth Andress, an Extension food safety specialist withthe UGA College of Family and Consumer Sciences.Keep Greens CoolOthers, though, are better kept in the fridge. Andress saidleafy vegetables like lettuce, spinach, collard greens and turnipgreens are among them.”Cabbagenaturally lasts longer, but other leafy vegetables need refrigerationfor best quality and longer shelf life,” she said. “Theylike the high humidity. And the cool temperatures prevent shrivelingand slow the loss of nutritional value.”Don’t place leafy veggies too close to the refrigerator walls,though. “If you keep your refrigerator extra cold, don’tput leafy vegetables in the coldest part, because they’ll freeze,”she said. “Vegetables like lettuce have very high water contentand freeze easily.”Store in Brown or Plastic BagsRefrigerate summer squash, cucumbers, eggplant, okra and zucchini,too. “Protect these vegetables from freezing, too, just likeleafy vegetables,” Andress said. “Place them in brownpaper bags or ventilated plastic bags before refrigeration. Tightlysealed plastic bags keep them too moist.”Unlike their larger bulb cousins, green onions, scallions andleeks should be refrigerated, too. “They like moisture, sorefrigerating them in plastic bags is a good idea,” Andresssaid.Cool Temps are ‘Berry’ NiceStrawberries,blueberries and raspberries should all be refrigerated. “Theyneed the cool temperatures for preservation. But don’t store themwet,” Andress said. “They like humidity, but the wetnesscan promote decay.” Store berries in loose or ventilatedplastic bags.Citrus fruits, such as oranges and grapefruits, can be refrigeratedto prolong shelf life.”They aren’t going to keep ripening, so use your own preference,”she said. “Refrigerate them if you like them cold.”Use Caution with MushroomsKeep mushrooms in the fridge, but never in airtight containers.”Raw mushrooms are very likely to contain bacteria that canquickly produce toxins that can cause food-borne illness,”Andress said. “Make sure you refrigerate mushrooms in ventilatedplastic or paper bags.”Andress said ventilated plastic bags are ideal for storingmany fruits and vegetables. “They’re perfect for allowingthe food to get the air circulation it needs,” she said.last_img read more

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St Johnsbury hospital leverages energy efficiency as prescription for saving $47,000

first_imgNortheastern Vermont Regional Hospital,At Northeastern Vermont Regional Hospital (NVRH), energy efficiency supports NVRH’s mission to provide high quality healthcare services that are focused on community needs at the lowest cost consistent with excellent care. To increase savings and comfort for both patients and staff, NVRH and its team of design engineers collaborated with Efficiency Vermont on its latest project, a large-scale expansion and renovation that enhances 33,000 square feet of the facility.Located in Vermont’s Northeast Kingdom, NVRH is a community, nonprofit, acute care, and critical access hospital. NVRH has long recognized the role energy efficiency can play in helping achieve the patient care mission.‘It was really a no-brainer to upgrade our older, energy-inefficient equipment and lighting to newer, more efficient options,’ said Richard Degreenia, director of plant operations at NVRH. ‘We’re cutting energy costs so we’re better able to serve our community ‘ the patients who come here every day for the best medical care.’NVRH undertook its expansion to improve accessibility and workflow and also to create additional space for treatment rooms, including the hospital’s X-ray area and day-surgery unit. Expanded office space, nurses’ stations and waiting rooms are also now part of the hospital’s enhanced space.  Expansion typically means consuming more energy, but NVRH was able to make significant expansions without increasing energy costs. Working together, NVRH and Efficiency Vermont identified cost-effective energy solutions that would not only benefit the hospital financially, but also improve comfort for employees and patients. Adding a more efficient lighting design and upgrading the hospital heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) system were at the crux of the work.All told, the lighting and HVAC measures help NVRH save 431,000 kWh annually, which translates to an estimated cost savings of more than $47,000.HVAC upgrades significantly contributed to those savings numbers. NVRH switched from using a constant-volume air system to a variable-air volume system, also called a VAV system. A VAV system offers two primary advantages: the fan capacity control allows the hospital to control fan speed, reducing energy consumed by fans, which can be a substantial part of the total cooling energy requirements of a building. Another advantage is more efficient temperature control.NVRH engages in ‘daylight harvesting,’ using sensors and controls to keep lights off when the natural illumination from skylights will provide sufficient light levels. NVRH also installed lighting monitors in public spaces, like lobbies. The monitors lower light levels in the absence of activity ‘ for example, when someone leaves a room, or area. This energy-smart approach to lighting was achieved by thinking about energy efficiency and incorporating ideas early on in the design process.”When a design team brings in Efficiency Vermont from the start, we’re able to work together to find the greatest energy savings at the lowest possible cost to the building owner,” said Sheryl Graves, energy consultant at Efficiency Vermont. “That’s because the planning stage is the most cost-effective time to incorporate efficiency. It’s a great feeling to support the design team’s vision for a building that will mean significantly lower overhead for the owners for years to come.”NVRH has worked with Efficiency Vermont since the organization’s inception in 2000, joining several Vermont hospitals that have taken the initiative to install energy-saving measures in partnership with the energy efficiency utility.After nearly a decade of energy efficiency work, NVRH’s Degreenia still has more projects on his mind, including a potential LED installation for the hospital building and parking lot lighting. Degreenia and his team have realized that continuous energy-efficient improvements provide a mechanism not only to achieve business goals, but to serve the patients and employees who come to NVRH every day.Efficiency Vermont was created by the Vermont Legislature and the Vermont Public Service Board to help all Vermonters reduce energy costs, strengthen the economy, and protect Vermont’s environment. Efficiency Vermont is currently operated by Vermont Energy Investment Corporation (VEIC), an independent organization under contract to the Vermont Public Service Board. VEIC is a Vermont-based nonprofit organization founded in 1986. For more information, contact Efficiency Vermont at 888-921-5990 or visit www.efficiencyvermont.com(link is external).last_img read more

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Terror on Brown Mountain

first_imgAudio interview with Brown Mountain Lights witness: Sometime around 7pm Thursday of last week I found myself sitting on the beat down bed of a dive hotel located in Boone, North Carolina. I was loading cameras into their bags and organizing some things I had just pulled out of the Blue Ridge Outdoors Subaru road-vehicle, which we use at the magazine for such adventures, and wondering why I had decided to go on a UFO hunt in the middle of the night all by myself. Of course, the sun was beginning to drop down behind the mountains and it’s always that initial shock of night that jolts the human psyche while mentally gearing up for any sort of outdoor adventure – especially venturing off into the woods in search of natural phenomenons all by your lonesome.I could get abducted, I thought to myself, and at the very least I’d go down as a legend. “Travel Writer Disappears at Brown Mountain on First Assignment” the headlines would read. But those thoughts had to be suppressed in order to get on with business, so loading the equipment up became first priority and I quickly made for the door.Now, just for a little backstory for those who haven’t heard: small glowing apparitions have been sighted from numerous viewpoints surrounding Brown Mountain for centuries. Some sources have even claimed the Native Americans had seen them even before land surveyors reportedly did in the 1700s. Scientists have tried to explain them, but no theory has ever been provided with proof. Native American spirits? Swamp gas? Mineral electricity produced by geological activity? People are still investigating them as I write. Nobody knows for sure, but I knew one thing: I wanted to get a look and see for myself what all the fuss was about.As I stepped out the back door of the hotel to hit the road and make tracks towards the backwoods, lightning flashed, followed by a comforting roll of thunder, followed by a few more flashes, intensifying in brightness and quantity as seconds passed. Great…Driving up the long, rugged road to Wiseman’s View Overlook the rain sputtered to a mellow drizzle and fog began to creep out of the woods. The drive was slow going and about as creepy as one could ask for on an October night, but the haunting vibe of the drive had livened my senses, as any dose of fear usually does, and I actually felt quite thrilled to be where I was at that very moment despite not being able to see anything and having no idea where I was in the middle of the woods…About 15 minutes later I had made it to the top and was surprised to see headlights behind me. Grateful or scared – I’m not really sure which it was – but definitely surprised, I pulled over thinking I could get a little window chat going and possibly a hiking partner. I rolled the window down just to watch the truck pass hurredly by. No dice. I reluctantly followed and met them in the parking lot.“What you want, bud,” the Southern drawl irritatedly came through the one-inch-cracked window as I stood outside the truck in the parking lot probably looking just like the exact psycho I feared running into myself. The guy clearly wanted nothing to do with me, which became more apparent when I realized there was a female in the car–one he was likely hoping to be spending some alone time with up there. Clicking on my trusty headlamp, I moved on and headed to the trail, partnerless.Let it be said that the trail to Wiseman’s View Overlook is not long. It’s quite short, in fact. But for a midwesterner on a stormy, foggy October night hiking in the pitch black, the eerie silence intermittently breached by strange noises that were definitely (probably not) bears hunting me down was enough to put me on edge. About five miles in (probably 50 yards) I reluctantly turned back.The midnight lovers were still in their car and in a last ditch effort to save this mission from failure, I bravely approached the vehicle once more to seek out hiking pals. In retrospect, this was a dumb idea. Retrospect hit me after five seconds of awkwardly lingering in the dark next to the truck as I called out to the vehicle’s passengers and they silently ignored me. Righty-o. Abort mission.Frustratedly driving back out on the main road foreign bends in highway and strange buildings I didn’t recognize began to catch my attention. Wrong turn. Faaaantastic. This night couldn’t seem to go my way. Suddenly I see it! Brown Mountain Overlook. I knew exactly where I was, I had read about this spot–it was the other lookout point! I abrubtly swerved into the overlook parking lot and felt joyously rejuvenated realizing the mission was not doomed.Not only was I where I wanted to be, I was greeted by proof that not all North Carolina guys are so bad as a younger guy approached me – I think his name was Zimmer – and began telling me about the lights.“Oh yeah, you’re in the right place, bud,” Zimmer said. He’d been coming here most of his life, mostly to hang out with his brother and friends and to hike the areas fantastic trails and riversides, but knew all too well that the lights existed. “You keep watching those hills and they’ll show up right on the side of that mountain right there,” as he pointed into the darkness.Zimmer and his pals hung out for a bit and eventually took off,  warning me to be careful up in those woods at night.Enter Cindy, a grandmother and strong believer in the lights who frequents the viewpoint hoping to catch a third sight of them. Cindy had brought up two of her grandchildren this particular night, planning to hang around for a couple hours as the kids ran around the hillside whispering of possible sightings and whatever else adolescent girls whisper about.The view from the Brown Mountain Overlook on Hwy 181The view from the Brown Mountain Overlook on Hwy 181.“The first time was about twenty years ago, and it was just over this range here to the left side of the Brown Mountain Overlook, there were red lights that were rising from somewhere near that peak–or just over the other side of that peak–and I thought they were airplanes. But they would rise and stop up not too far above the range and then start coming towards the direction of where we were parked, and then they would disappear,” she said as cricket chirps echoed through the blackness of the canyon.Cindy’s advice: Patience is key.The full moon would peek through the clouds every now and then reflecting off of spooky fog patches down in the valley creating ghostly hazes far below. Cindy was excited to be there again staring over that bluff hoping to catch another glimpse of the legendary glowing orbs that every-so-often present themselves to patient viewers, and I was excited to have a few friendly people around as we all stood loyaly watching through the night. As time passed the rain returned, the air turned brisk, the wind began to bellow, and everybody’s patience wore thin. Skunked.As it turned out, the experience was worth the trouble despite the lack of a triumphant ending. Standing there on the edge, headlights swept passed me as Cindy and her children fled the coming rain and I was left standing alone in the dark once again. “Be careful if you’re going to stay alone,” she had told me while pulling away. But my own fear had subsided long ago, as it usually does when the thrill of adventure begins to peak and fear converts to fun, which, in turn, becomes reward. The lights hadn’t shown that night, but as I walked back to the car at the witching hour, I knew the night was a success. And not only was it a success, I’d never forget it.last_img read more

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Clips of the Week: Creeking in WNC, Singing in SNP, and Biting It at the TDF

first_imgOur favorite web videos from around the internets for the week that was:1. Taking It to the CreekWith the amount of precipitation the Southeast has gotten this spring and summer, the creekboating has been amaze-balls. Check out this boof montage footage from western North Carolina and East Tennessee.2. Sweet Mountain JamThis submission from BRO reader Kara Murphy is a original song set over some great shots from Virginia, including Grayson Highlands, McAfee Knob, Peaks of Otter, Shenandoah National Park and more.3. Something Dirty From the TourHere is something dirty from the Tour de France, and it’s not riders doping. Possibly NSFW language at the end, but not really sure because they are speaking English, like, the Great Britain version.last_img

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Cuomo Challenger Astorino Seizes on Corruption Panel Report

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Republican gubernatorial challenger Rob Astorino, who has struggled mightily to chip away at Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s massive lead in the polls, may have finally found a chink in the governor’s armor—the governor’s own public corruption investigatory panel tasked with cleaning up Albany.An explosive new report published in The New York Times Wednesday details how Cuomo’s close associates intervened whenever the panel of prosecutors—known as the Moreland Commission—began focusing on groups politically linked to Cuomo, even to the point of demanding that subpoenas be withdrawn.The Times detailed the actions of Lawrence Schwartz, one of Cuomo’s senior aides, and Regina Calcaterra, the commission’s executive director and a former Suffolk County chief deputy county executive under Steve Bellone.The commissioners believed, according to the Times, that Calcaterra was updating the governor’s office in real-time during their meetings, and was directly involved in quashing subpoenas.Her meddling apparently became so intrusive that Nassau County District Attorney Kathleen Rice, one of the co-chairs, wanted Calcaterra replaced, the Times reported. Rice stepped down after announcing her bid for Congress.Astorino, the Westchester County Executive, is using the report as a lifeline to keep his struggling campaign above water. He wasted no time attacking Cuomo in a conference call with reporters. He accused the governor of breaking the law and went so far as calling him the “most corrupt governor in history.”When asked what laws he believes Cuomo actually violated, Astorino responded: “obstruction of justice.” Pressed further for specific charges, he didn’t elaborate.“This is obviously very serious,” Astorino said over the phone from Aspen, where he’d just flown in for the Republican Governors Association’s executive meeting, armed with a copy of the Times he brought with him.“It’s likely, a strong likelihood, that it will result in criminal charges,” he said. “Andrew Cuomo has a lot of questions to answer.“The people of New York, I think, are absolutely tired of scandal and corruption in Albany,” he added. “It’s galling that a man who rode in promising to be the White Knight is actually knee-deep in scandal right now.”Astorino fired off several questions aimed at the governor, including: Who gave Regina Calcaterra the authority to interfere with the subpoenas and investigations? Who in the Cuomo administration has been subpoenaed? How many subpoenas were squashed by the governor’s office?Astorino also challenged Cuomo to release all emails and BlackBerry messages related to the Moreland Commission’s investigation.His heated rebuke of Cuomo comes only two days after a Siena College poll had him trailing the governor by 37 points.Astorino’s problem? Many voters simply don’t know who he is, according to pollsters.“Astorino has failed to become significantly more known to voters or to put a dent in the Cuomo armor in the last six months,” Siena College pollster Steven Greenberg said when the poll was released. “He has much to do and not much time to do it in.”It may not be for a lack of trying, however.Astorino has criticized Cuomo’s response to Superstorm Sandy, noting that thousands of Sandy victims still aren’t in their homes, and for using federal Sandy relief money to fund state tourism advertisements in hurricane-devastated areas.Gov. Andrew Cuomo giving a speech in Huntington. (Spencer Rumsey/Long Island Press)He said that Cuomo’s lead in the polls is “based on a big lie.”There’s also the issue of money, or lack thereof in Astorino’s war chest. According to the latest filings, Cuomo had $35 million on hand; Astorino, $2.4 million.Cuomo has not publicly addressed the Times’ report or issued any statements. But his office did release a press release Wednesday announcing $175 million for localities to pay for post-Sandy storm repairs, $145 million of which is going to Nassau and Suffolk counties.Astorino called on Cuomo to address the public, saying the governor should come clean about “what he knew, what he ordered, what he approved.”He also urged the U.S. Attorney in Manhattan, Preet Bharara, to continue his investigation into the commission.Bharara “needs to do his job efficiently and he also needs to do it expeditiously,” Astorino said, preferably before Election Day “so the public can feel they can make an honest evaluation of the candidates.”In a 13-page response to the Times, the governor’s office defended Cuomo’s actions.“A commission appointed by and staffed by the executive cannot investigate the executive,” his office reportedly said. “It is a pure conflict of interest and would not pass the laugh test.”But, the Times reported, “The governor’s office interfered with the commission when it was looking into groups that were politically close to him. In fact, the commission never tried to investigate his administration.”The commission, which was formed July 2, 2013, was unceremoniously disbanded last March—10 months sooner than expected when Cuomo announced its formation.last_img read more

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Mysterious Drone Company Mum On Riverhead Factory Plans

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A secretive aerospace company planning to launch solar-powered drone factory on eastern Long Island has sparked rumors that Facebook may have contracted the firm to beam Internet service to Third World nations.Luminati Aerospace, which last month bought a 16-acre plot for $3 million from the recently closed Skydive Long Island, is requesting permission from the Town of Riverhead to fly its next-generation drones from a limited-use runway at the Enterprise Park in Calverton known as EPCAL—but remains tight-lipped about the unmanned aircraft it plans to manufacture.“There’s a confidential nature to our contract and I have to respect the wishes of our client,” Daniel Preston, CEO and chief technology officer for Luminati, told the Riverhead town board Thursday. When reporters pressed him for more information after the meeting, he said the company “is not at liberty to discuss” details or reveal their client other than to say they’re commercial and not military.Facebook did not respond to a request to confirm or deny whether they hired Luminati, but the social media company has reportedly been developing similar large solar-powered drones—circling the planet at 60,000 to 90,000 feet, above commercial aircraft traffic—to expand Internet service to vast unconnected parts of the world. Google, which reportedly has a similar plan using balloons, did not respond, either.Despite the limited information available—even Luminati’s website is only one page with no links or contact information, just a photo of an antique astrology-style sketch of the sun—officials spoke highly of the company, which derives its name from the ancient secret society The Illuminati.“It’s so exciting to think that once again we may be on the forefront of aviation,” Riverhead Town Supervisor Sean Walter said, referring to Grumman’s storied history at the site and the many firsts in flight that earned LI the nickname, The Cradle of Aviation. “This is the biggest thing that’s happening on Long Island right now.”Preston echoed the sentiment. Although there is little known about the project, what is clear is that the plan is only in its infancy. Should the town board approve Luminati’s request to use one of two runways at the industrial park, the company also plans to ask for permission to expand a building at the site to fit manufacturing equipment too large for the current facility.Preston noted that the electric-powered drones neither burn fuel nor have the same deafening roar as standard aircraft, so the impact on neighbors and the environment should be minimal.“By aviation standards, or by any standards…we are very quiet operation and very green in nature,” he said.If approved, it would take an estimated six months to build the plant. In the meantime, Preston said the company’s leadership is moving to Riverhead and accepting applications for about 40 designers, machinists and other workers. Walter said he hopes to approve the runway agreement by Nov. 4.The news came shortly after Suffolk County lawmakers passed the first legislation on LI regulating small consumer drones, with other local municipalities and the Federal Aviation Administration considering similar regulations. Small drone sightings reported to local authorities saw a fivefold increase so far this year over all of last year on LI, the Press exclusively reported last month.A public hearing on the runway agreement proposal will be held 7 p.m. Tues., Oct. 20 at Riverhead Town Hall, 200 Howell Rd., Riverhead.last_img read more

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BIMCO Names New Secretary General & CEO

first_imgThe world’s largest shipping association BIMCO has appointed David Loosley as its new Secretary-General & CEO with effect from June 2020. Mr. Loosley joins from the Institute of Marine Engineering Science & Technology (IMarEST), which he has led for the last eight years.Angus Frew, BIMCO’s current Secretary General & CEO, had previously announced that he will be stepping down in the summer of 2020 after leading the organization for seven years as he wishes to spend more time in the UK and less time working. “We are delighted to have found a successor who can continue to build on the excellent work carried out by Angus Frew in positioning BIMCO as the world’s largest international shipping association. David has outstanding communication skills and is a proven leader of an international shipping-related business,” BIMCO President, Sadan Kaptanoglu said announcing his appointment.Prior to joining IMarEST, Mr. Loosley ran operations at the United Kingdom Hydrographic Office (UKHO) where he was responsible for the transition from analogue to digital navigational products, and chaired the Digital Geospatial Information Working Group (DGWIG) to help drive global standardization. He has also served at sea for 10 years in the UK Royal Navy.“I am very excited to be joining BIMCO at this critical time for the industry where a volatile market, new technology, and increasing environmental regulation are all having a significant impact. I look forward to working with the Board of Directors to build on the work of my predecessor and to ensure that BIMCO maintains its relevance and leadership position, continuing to provide practical solutions and expert advice to its members and the wider maritime community,” Loosley said.last_img read more

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