Sheets Ready to Get to Work

first_img Facebook Twitter Sheets Ready to Get to Work She has been charged by the Governor to develop a strategic plan for agriculture within the next 30 days.  She told HAT that plan will focus on growing Indiana’s ag economy and growing Indiana’s farming operations, “How do we bring sons and daughters back to the farm and help them be successful; and we are looking at ways to do that.” Another top priority for Sheets will be to fill several key positions at the department, including several in the Division of Soil and Water Conservation, “They do a real good job of working together as an entity, especially with a big field staff; and I want to see that continue and get them the tools they need — and do that within some budgetary constraints.” Home News Feed Sheets Ready to Get to Work Gina SheetsOn Thursday, Governor Pence appointed Gina Sheets as the new Director of the State Department of Agriculture. This week she is ready to hit the ground running. Sheets has been serving as the economic development director at ISDA for the past several years, so getting to know the agency will not be an issue, “I know where the coffee pot is at, so I am ready to go.” Lt. Governor Sue Ellspermann has made it clear that fostering economic development is the new mission for ISDA. Sheets will be the point person on the development of the food and agriculture innovation corridor that the Pence administration wants developed in Indiana. Sheets said her experience in economic development will allow her to get this project moving, “I know the economic development folks; I can speak their language; I can help get investments in local communities; and I really think we can develop an agricultural innovation corridor.”  She said there are already several areas of the state that have started work on creating such a corridor. Facebook Twitter By Gary Truitt – Jan 20, 2013 SHARE A role that Sheets has not had before is to be an advocate for agriculture and work with the non-farm public to articulate the needs of Indiana farm families. But it is a role that Sheets feels she can handle, “I have a business background; I have a farming background. So I feel I can deal with a variety of differences audiences with a variety of different agendas.” SHARE Hear the complete interview with Gina Sheets[audio:https://www.hoosieragtoday.com//wp-content/uploads//2013/01/Sheets.mp3|titles=Sheets Ready to Get to Work] Previous articleVilsack and Mayors Discuss Ag NeedsNext articleAnalyst Says Take Long Hard Look at Crop Insurance Gary Truittlast_img read more

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Rains Continue and Crop Condition is Steady

first_imgHome Indiana Agriculture News Rains Continue and Crop Condition is Steady By Andy Eubank – Jul 20, 2015 SHARE Facebook Twitter Rains Continue and Crop Condition is Steady Heavy rains as well as wind, hail and lightning, took a toll on crops last week, according to the USDA, NASS, Great Lakes Region. A few days of dry, warm weather were outshined by rain at the beginning and end of the week. Many areas of the state received two or more inches of rain, with some areas receiving in excess of five inches of rain, adding more unneeded moisture to already soaked fields. There were 2.3 days suitable for field work, 0.5 days higher than the previous week.Farmers were challenged to find a window to combine winter wheat, cut and bale hay, bale straw and plant double-crop soybeans this week. Winter wheat harvest continued slowly, but those who found a little window to harvest reported wheat of low quality. There have been reports of elevators rejecting wheat loads due to the presence of vomitoxin. Winter wheat left unharvested continues to have quality issues, including problems with scab, sprouting and mold. Soybeans looked pretty good in places that were not drowned out. Several farmers were able to spray soybean fields that had been previously neglected due to wet field conditions. Corn growth and condition continued to be variable across the State depending upon soils and moisture. Early plantings on well-drained soils were looking better than later planted corn struggling with excessive moisture and nutrient deficiency. There were reports of tasseling in corn only 2-3 feet high. Although feedlots remain sloppy, livestock were in good condition. In some areas, cattle were being kept off pastures to prevent them from becoming mud pits. Other activities for the week included spraying fungicides and herbicides where possible and attending county fairs.Regionally, winter wheat harvested was 44% in the North, 76% in Central, and 93% in the South. Soybeans blooming was 50% complete in the North, 49% in Central and 59% in the South. By region, soybean conditions rated good to excellent were 40% in the North, 39% in Central and 41% in the South. Corn silking was 41% complete in the North, 45% in Central and 80% in South. By region, corn conditions rated good to excellent were 40% in the North, 45% in Central and 54% in the South.National corn condition remains steady at 69% in the good to excellent category. With 62% of soybeans rated good to excellent, there is no change in that number from a week ago.Source: NASS Facebook Twitter SHARE Previous articlePurdue Ag Opens Nominations for 2 Top AwardsNext articleAgronomist Suggests Extra Eyes when Evaluating Crops Andy Eubanklast_img read more

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DuPont Pioneer Harvest Update 10/16/17

first_img SHARE Facebook Twitter Facebook Twitter Home News Feed DuPont Pioneer Harvest Update 10/16/17 SHARE DuPont Pioneer Harvest Update 10/16/17 DuPont Pioneer Harvest Update 10/16/17According to Ryan Martin’s harvest forecast, we will make good progress on harvest this week.  According to USDA, Indiana has 34% of the corn harvested statewide and nationally only 28% harvested, well behind last year and the 5 year average. Dan Emmert, agronomist with DuPont Pioneer in SW Indiana, told HAT that harvest progress in his area has been good, the crops are ready, and harvest is headed into the home stretch. “I would estimate about 70% of the corn has been harvested in SW Indiana,” he said and. Most of the corn planted in April has dried down nicely, he added, “On some test plots last week, we had about 20% moisture.” He noted that yields on corn and soybeans were coming in higher than expected by growers. Previous articleClosing CommentsNext articleWeed Scientist Has Doubts Over Dicamba Restrictions’ Effectiveness Gary Truitt Growers in SW Indiana are seeing some significant evidence on what the use of fungicide and monitoring nitrogen levels can have on yield. More on that in our next DuPont Pioneer Harvest update, later this week. Emmert says, this year, yields on early planted crops have been better than expected and reinforces the notion that early planting yields better, “This year, like most years, the soybeans that get planted in April yield very well. The plants tend to be a little shorter and just stand and yield better.” He said the same thing can be said for corn, “The corn we get planted in April, pollinates before it gets too hot and dry, and that is a good thing.” By Gary Truitt – Oct 16, 2017 last_img read more

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China Implementing New Import Requirements on U.S. Soybeans

first_img Facebook Twitter SHARE China Implementing New Import Requirements on U.S. Soybeans SHARE By Hoosier Ag Today – Jan 1, 2018 U.S. soybean exports will undergo a new procedure to meet new phytosanitary requirements for shipping to China, starting on January 1. The U.S. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service says the new procedure applies to both bulk and container shipments of raw and unprocessed American soybeans to China. APHIS says compliance with the new rules will be necessary to maintain uninterrupted shipments to China. Greg Ibach , USDA Undersecretary for Marketing and Regulatory Programs, issued a statement saying that the agency worked closely with China and U.S. soybean industry representatives in coming up with an acceptable procedure.Earlier this year, China said the U.S. soybean shipments that were coming into the country contained too much foreign material in each load, including dirt and weed seeds. Chinese officials said the foreign material exceeded their standards and some of the weed seeds were of possible quarantine concern. Under the new procedure, APHIS will now notify China of any shipments that exceed one percent foreign material. China has assured the U.S. that all shipments will be allowed to continue while America develops new farm-to-export procedures to meet the new requirements.Source: NAFB News Service Previous articleDownward Pressure Expected on 2018 Cash RentsNext articleIndiana Dairy Hosts Screening of Food Evolution Movie Hoosier Ag Today Facebook Twitter Home Indiana Agriculture News China Implementing New Import Requirements on U.S. Soybeanslast_img read more

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Purdue’s Lusk Appointed to USDA NAREEE Advisory Board

first_imgHome Indiana Agriculture News Purdue’s Lusk Appointed to USDA NAREEE Advisory Board Facebook Twitter SHARE Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue today announced the appointment of 10 members to serve on the National Agricultural Research, Extension, Education, and Economics (NAREEE) Advisory Board, including Dr. Jayson Lusk, Distinguished Professor and Head of the Department of Agricultural Economics at Purdue University“These members of the NAREEE Advisory Board help ensure that our work at USDA is facts-based, data-driven, and customer-focused,” Perdue said. “They bring real-world knowledge and expertise that is invaluable to our efforts.”The NAREEE Board regularly advises the Secretary and land-grant colleges and universities on top national priorities and policies related to food and agricultural research, education, extension, and economics.  The Board’s main objective is to contribute to effective federal agricultural research, education and economics programs through broad stakeholder feedback and sound science. Board members also perform an annual review of the relevance of the research, education, economics, and extension programs at USDA and the adequacy of funding for those programs.The 10 appointees announced today will serve three-year terms that expire September 30. They are (the category of stakeholder that each represents is noted in parentheses): Lisabeth Hobart, Government Relations Manager, GROWMARK Inc., Bloomington, IL (Category B. Farm Cooperatives);Chalmers Carr III, Owner, Titan Farms, Ridge Spring, SC (Category D. Plant Commodity Producer);Dr. Edmund Buckner, Dean & Director, Land Grant Programs, Alcorn State University, Lorman, MS (Category E. National Aquaculture Association);Dr. John Coupland, Professor of Food Science, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (Category H. National Food Science Organization);Dr. Sarah Francis, Associate Professor of Human Sciences, Nutrition and Wellness, Iowa State University, Ames, IA Category J. National Nutritional Science Society);Dr. David Baltensperger, Department Head, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX (Category K. 1862 Land-Grant Colleges and Universities);Dr. James Allan, Executive Director of the School of Forestry, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, AZ (Category V.  National Forestry Group);Chad Ellis, Industry Relations, Manager, Noble Research Institute, Ardmore, OK (Category W. National Conservation or Natural Resource Groups);Dr. Robert Zeigler, Director General and CEO Emeritus, International Rice Research Institute, Portland, OR (Category X. Private Sector Organization involved in International Development); andDr. Jayson Lusk, Department Head, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (Category Y. National Social Science Association).Each of the 25 NAREEE Advisory Board members represents a specific category of U.S. Agricultural stakeholders as outlined in the Agricultural Act of 2014. The categories  include farming or ranching, food production and processing, forestry research, crop and animal science, land-grant institutions, non-land grant college or university with a historic commitment to research in the food and agricultural sciences, food retailing and marketing, rural economic development, and natural resource and consumer interest groups, among many others. Each member serves a 2-3 year appointment.  Terms for members overlap so that approximately one-third of the Board is replaced and/or reappointed each year.Source: USDA Office of Communications Purdue’s Lusk Appointed to USDA NAREEE Advisory Board SHARE Facebook Twitter Previous article91st National FFA Convention Opens in Indianapolis on the HAT Wednesday Morning EditionNext articleChinese Investor-owned Smithfield Foods Eligible for U.S. Trade Relief Hoosier Ag Today By Hoosier Ag Today – Oct 24, 2018 last_img read more

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Marion County’s Marissa Mikel Wins Discussion Meet Competition at INFB State…

first_img Marion County’s Marissa Mikel Wins Discussion Meet Competition at INFB State Convention By Hoosier Ag Today – Dec 19, 2018 SHARE SHARE Marissa Mikel is the winner of the 2018 Indiana Farm Bureau Young Farmer Discussion Meet. The competition, which was held Dec. 7 and 8 in Fort Wayne as a part of the INFB state convention, is one of the three major awards presented to Farm Bureau members age 35 and younger. During the competition, contestants participate in a group discussion that simulates a committee meeting.Mikel and the other finalists and participants discussed common dilemmas and potential problems facing farmers in America, such as:How can Farm Bureau best protect farmers’ and ranchers’ access to production technology options?As the voice of agriculture, how can Farm Bureau be more inclusive of all agriculture and production practices?How can the industry attract the best and brightest minds from STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) into agricultural careers?How can farmers implement market trends and develop responsive business plans to generate value-added ventures and farm profits?How do we create membership value and broaden the base of supporters in the Farm Bureau family?Mikel will now advance to the national Young Farmer & Rancher Discussion Meet, which will be held during the American Farm Bureau Annual Convention, Jan. 11-16 in New Orleans. Mikel is currently employed as a legislative assistant for the Indiana House of Representatives. She holds a bachelor’s degree in Agricultural Economics from Purdue University.As winner of the INFB Discussion Meet, Mikel received a $4,000 cash prize from Indiana Farm Bureau Insurance and expenses paid to the national convention in New Orleans.The three runners-up were Kent Burton, Fulton County; Mason Gordon, Rush County; and Amanda Mosiman, Warrick County. The runners-up each received a $1,000 cash prize from Indiana Farm Bureau Insurance.Also announced at this year’s state convention was the 2019 INFB State Young Farmer Committee. The 2019 committee, by district, is as follows.District 1: Jake and Jill Smoker, LaPorte County.District 2: Scott and Jenna Burton, Kosciusko County.District 3: Ryan and Marie Hilton, Jasper County.District 4: Daniel and Leslie Stauffer, Wabash County.District 5: Nick and Beth Tharp, Putnam County.District 6: Courtney Rude, Marion County.District 7: Justin and Alli McKain, Sullivan County.District 8: Matthew and Michelle Tobias, Shelby County.District 9: John and Abby Michel, Gibson County.District 10: Deidra Gottbrath, Washington County.Source: Indiana Farm Bureau Facebook Twitter Facebook Twitter Home Indiana Agriculture News Marion County’s Marissa Mikel Wins Discussion Meet Competition at INFB State Convention Previous articleLivestock Antibiotic Use Down 33 PercentNext articleThe Dollars and Cents of Soil Health Efforts Discussed on HAT Soil Health Podcast Hoosier Ag Todaylast_img read more

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China Offers to Purchase U.S. Ag Products Ahead of Trade talks

first_img Planned trade talks next month between China and the U.S. has agriculture and the U.S. economy optimistic the talks will make progress. Politico reports that in the talks last week, China offered to purchase more U.S. agricultural products ahead of the planned negotiations for October. Phone conversations are expected to increase in volume between the two sides over the next few weeks. China will travel to Washington in early October to meet face-to-face, a rescheduling of talks planned for early September. The planned meetings this month lost traction after an escalation of tariffs between the U.S. and China in August. During phone conversations last week, Chinese official confirmed that the “two sides agreed that they should work together and take practical actions to create favorable conditions for consultations.”Meanwhile, farm groups are urging Congress and the administration to finalize the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement, as lawmakers have returned from a six-week recess. Finally, President Trump is expected to sign a trade agreement with Japan this month, another welcomed trade development for agriculture. By Eric Pfeiffer – Sep 9, 2019 China Offers to Purchase U.S. Ag Products Ahead of Trade talks SHARE Previous articleUSCMA Capitol Rally Planned for ThursdayNext articleAFBF Warns Against Small Refiner Waivers in Comments to EPA Eric Pfeiffer Home Indiana Agriculture News China Offers to Purchase U.S. Ag Products Ahead of Trade talks SHARE Facebook Twitter Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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TCU’s annual tree lighting to provide holiday kickoff for community

first_img + posts printThe Fort Worth community can join the Horned Frog community to kick-off the holiday season Tuesday with TCU’s annual tree lighting ceremony.The event, which starts at 6:30 in the Campus Commons, has been celebrated for more than 40 years.“It’s gone from a small campus event, to a large community-wide program,” said Brad Thompson, assistant director of student activities. “The tree lighting has become something truly valuable to our student body and our surrounding community.”Thompson said guests can expect a 43-foot Christmas tree, 2,000 more lights than last year and a more dramatic fireworks display.“I love that we have a strong tradition that students really respond to that’s not very complicating or complex,” Thompson said. “But we tweak it every year to give our students and the community something new to look forward to.”Thompson said various activities and displays catering to students and families will be offered including hot chocolate bars, green screen backdrops and photographs taken with SuperFrog Santa.“We will have a fake reindeer display of cows dressed as reindeer and a display with real reindeer,” Thompson said. “Children can also participate in activities including writing letters to Santa.”Courtney Tulbert, a local resident, said she and her family have attended the TCU tree lighting every year they have lived in Fort Worth.“We love seeing alumni, current students and future students come together to kick off the Christmas season,”Tulbert said. “There’s always so much to do for the little ones and the students are so great with them. We love seeing the current students make Christmas at TCU so special for the children and the rest of the community.”Thompson said there are many activities for kids, but the event is created with students in mind.“We do this event for our students, because we know they are paying for it,” he said. “It’s still a unique blend of a great community event, but one that students love.”Thompson said Order of Omega will host a gift drive where guests can donate gifts to the 500 local children the organization is sponsoring this year for the holidays.“A lot of people are contributing toward this year’s tree lighting in their own different way,” Thompson said. “We will have roughly 40 volunteers from different campus and area organizations.”He said music will be performed at both ends of Campus Commons. A TCU alumn will perform classic holiday music with a band. Members of TCU Acapella Society will perform by Frog Fountain.Thompson said he and his team have planned for more than 6,500 people to attend the tree lighting this year.“Last year, we counted more than 6,000 attendees at the tree lighting,” Thompson said. “Because of its growing success, we budgeted $30,000 for this year’s event.”He said in years past the event has cost between $17,000 and $22,000.“We’re always making it better, and trying to make it a stronger program,” Thompson said. “We try and create a large gathering point for TCU’s student community, but also for the Fort Worth community.” Previous articleWin over Baylor speaks volumes of Frogs’ resilienceNext articleTCU Volleyball earns berth to NCAA Tournament Claire Girman RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Claire Girmanhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/claire-girman/ Claire Girmanhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/claire-girman/ Facebook The109: Community hosts fundraiser to support injured Fort Worth officer Twitter Linkedin Claire Girmanhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/claire-girman/ Sickle cell support group raises awareness, gives back to local doctors Abortion access threatened as restrictive bills make their way through Texas Legislature ReddIt Claire Girman Claire Girman is a journalism major from Chapel Hill, North Carolina. She’s fueled by college sports rage, literature and French press coffee. Claire Girmanhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/claire-girman/ Is everyone scared? If you aren’t, you should be. Today is Friday the 13th and superstition has it that bad things will come your way. Don’t do anything stupid like walk under a ladder or open an umbrella inside. The rumors say that, if you do, you will have several years of bad luck. Linkedin Facebook ReddIt Open Streets event closes roadway in order to open for people Grains to grocery: One bread maker brings together farmers and artisans at locally-sourced store Community to host fundraiser Monday to support injured Fort Worth officer Twitter Fort Worth set to elect first new mayor in 10 years Saturdaylast_img read more

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Market Square set to be renovated

first_imgSGA brings ‘It’s On Us’ to campus in joint Big 12 initiative Twitter Robert Carr Chapel holds Election Day service printTCU Dining Services discussed plans for a complete renovation of Market Square at the Student Government Association House of Representatives meeting last week.Michael Dahl, General Manager of Dining Services, told the representatives that Market Square, the main dining area for students located on the second floor of the Brown-Lupton University Union, was originally designed to serve about seven million meals.Through the spring of 2016, they had already served over 11 million meals.According to Dahl, talks have already begun to completely overhaul Market Square.The renovations could begin as soon as summer 2017, but depending on a number of factors, including other campus construction, could be delayed until summer 2018.In the meantime, Dining Services is making an effort to make Market Square less crowded and a more enjoyable experience for students.Customer Service Manager Eric Davis said he and the staff are aware that the crowds during popular meal times are an issue for students in Market Square, and they want to explore all available avenues to remedy the problem.With the addition of “meal exchanges” to all unlimited meal plans, Dining Services is attempting to encourage students to eat meals at other locations across campus, such as the King Family Commons and Smith Hall.Meal exchanges can be used at any dining location on campus, aside from Chick-Fil-A.All unlimited meal plans are equipped with 10 meal exchange swipes, while the Flex 7 and Flex 12 plans come with 50 and 100 exchange swipes respectively.Dining Services hopes the meal exchange effort will also take some of the burdens off of the facilities in Market Square, which will keep it well-maintained and preserve it for longer.For more information on renovations to Market Square, meal plan details, dining locations on campus and any other dining related information, visit the TCU Dining Services website. Students enjoy Market Square, the main dining spot in the BLUU (TCU360). TAGStext only Cole Polleyhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/cole-polley/ Cole Polleyhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/cole-polley/ Cole Polley + posts Linkedin Cole Polleyhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/cole-polley/ SGA holds Outreach Day to interact with students Facebookcenter_img Linkedin Facebook SGA supports addition of new minor Cole Polleyhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/cole-polley/ Welcome TCU Class of 2025 Twitter ReddIt Previous articleNeeley School of Business revamps Professional Development CenterNext articleTCU alumna, country artist releases new single Cole Polley RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Cole is a Sophomore Journalism major from Llano, Texas. He’s an avid Seinfeld watcher and he is passionate about the San Antonio Spurs, listening to Drake & chicken wings. Hit him up on Twitter @CPolley12! World Oceans Day shines spotlight on marine plastic pollution TCU places second in the National Student Advertising Competition, the highest in school history ReddItlast_img read more

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What we’re reading: Controversy in D.C.

first_imgAbortion access threatened as restrictive bills make their way through Texas Legislature Linkedin What we’re reading: Arrivals in Argentina Corinne Hildebrandthttps://www.tcu360.com/author/corinne-hildebrandt/ Members of the media follow attorney Kevin Downing, center, with the defense team for Paul Manafort, leaving federal court in Washington, Friday, Sept. 14, 2018. Former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort has pleaded guilty to two federal charges as part of a cooperation deal with prosecutors. The deal requires him to cooperate “fully and truthfully” with special counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia investigation. The charges against Manafort are related to his Ukrainian consulting work, not Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election.(AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais) Corinne Hildebrandt is a sophomore journalism major and sociology minor from Wayne, Illinois. She enjoys staying active and has a difficult time sitting still for long periods of time. When she’s not reporting, Corinne is most likely on the go exploring the many restaurants (and ice cream shops) that Fort Worth has to offer. Facebook + posts Parking lot closures cause new problems for students ReddIt Corinne Hildebrandthttps://www.tcu360.com/author/corinne-hildebrandt/ Corinne Hildebrandthttps://www.tcu360.com/author/corinne-hildebrandt/ Fort Worth B-Cycle looks to attract more riders What we’re reading: Chauvin found guilty in Floyd case, Xi to attend Biden’s climate change summit Linkedin What we’re reading: Former Vice President dies at 93, Chad President killed on frontlines Twitter Facebook Every vote counts this midterm season Corinne Hildebrandthttps://www.tcu360.com/author/corinne-hildebrandt/ Twitter Corinne Hildebrandt ReddIt Previous articleRevitalized organization to push for campus-wide sustainabilityNext articleHoroscope: November 28, 2018 Corinne Hildebrandt RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR printWe’re back and we’re reading – everything from the “New York Times” to the “Washington Post.” We’re trying to help you keep up with the rapid pace of politics and everyday news. Today, we’ve got an update on the last of the midterm elections, an ex-Trump campaign advisor accused of lying, and a major cut to the U.S. job market.The last election Mississippians are headed to the polls…again. Today, they will vote for the final U.S. senator, and the results of this runoff will decide if the Republicans occupy 52 or 53 seats in the Senate. The options include current Sen. Cindy Hyde-Smith (R) and former Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy (D). Despite the rocky midterm season seen in Mississippi, the Republican candidate is still favored to win, according to FiveThirtyEight. So go out and get your ‘I Voted’ sticker and put this midterm election season to a close. More lies on Capitol Hill Prosecutors working with special counsel Robert S. Mueller III said former Trump campaign manager, Paul Manafort, lied and breached their plea agreement in the investigation of Russian interference. So the saga continues.Mueller said Manafort should be sentenced immediately as a result of his continued lies and lack of cooperation with their agreement. This comes after Manafort pled guilty to charges of cheating the Internal Revenue Service by withholding money and violating foreign-lobbying laws.Looks like Manafort might be spending a little more time behind bars.Cuts to the automotive industryAutomotive giant, General Motors, announced the idling of five factories throughout North America in an attempt to decrease costs. GM’s decision to shut down factories will cut nearly 14,000 jobs in the United States.The corporation’s earnings have remained the same, but due to new consumer tastes the company’s sales have been on the decline. U.S. customers have shifted towards buying bigger cars like SUVs rather than mid-sized sedans.As a result, GM is expected to save roughly $6 billion a year by 2020. While these cutbacks are good for GM, President Trump, who pushes for keeping jobs domestic, is not a fan.Unrest at GoogleGoogle workers have started another protest, and this time it’s against the tech giant’s plan to build a Chinese search engine. More than 90 employees have publicly voiced their opposition to the project, code-named Dragonfly, as it raised concerns about the consequences of a tech corporation cooperating with an authoritarian government. The project is designed to alleviate censorship on material China has deemed politcally sensitive and help Internet users find more information on health treatments or avoiding scams. If Dragonfly passes, Google would have access to the Chinese online search market for the first time in over a decade. The mission to MarsNASA’s mission to Mars was a success when the Insight lander touched down on the planet’s surface Monday. This completes the first step of NASA’s billion-dollar mission to study the interior of our solar system’s red planet. The spacecraft sent a photo of the martian horizon to engineers and scientists in California validating their mission as a success.This milestone marks the 8th time the U.S. has landed on Mars, but the first attempt to study the deep interior of the planet. Risky romaineFor those still not eating romaine because of the E. coli bacteria risk, the CDC is now giving the ‘go ahead’ as long as the lettuce isn’t from California.According to Buzzfeed News, the recent outbreak of E.coli has made 43 people sick from 12 different states and hospitalized 16 people. A new report published by the CDC stated that the source of contamination in the lettuce has been traced back to the central and northern coastal regions of California. The CDC is still advising consumers to be wary of what they’re choosing. So it’s okay to start eating romaine again, but just remember to check the label. That’s all we have for today. Check back tomorrow for more.last_img read more

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