Stars To Honor Don Williams With Tribute Album

first_imgGarth Brooks, Lady Antebellum, Trisha Yearwood, Dierks Bentley, John Prine, Chris Stapleton and Alison Krauss are just some of the stars set to honor country music legend Don Williams on a new tribute album.Gentle Giants: The Songs Of Don Williams is slated to be released on May 26, with many of the proceeds to go MusiCares.Gentle Giants: The Songs of Don Williams track listing:1. “Tulsa Time” – Pistol Annies2. “I Believe in You” – Brandy Clark3. “We’ve Got a Good Fire Goin’” – Lady Antebellum4. “Some Broken Hearts Never Mend” – Dierks Bentley5. “Amanda” – Chris Stapleton feat. Morgane Stapleton6. “Till The Rivers All Run Dry” – Alison Krauss7. “Love Is On A Roll” – John Prine feat. Roger Cook8. “If I Needed You” – Jason Isbell & Amanda Shires9. “Maggie’s Dream” – Trisha Yearwood10. “Lord I Hope This Day is Good” – Keb’ Mo’11. “Good Ole Boys Like Me” – Garth Brookslast_img read more

Read More »

GLIDE Announces 2018 Auction For Power Lunch With Warren Buffett

first_imgGlide is pleased to announce the 19th Annual eBay for Charity Auction for Power Lunch with Warren Buffett.Offered through eBay for Charity, bidding for this year’s auction opens on Sunday, May 27 and runs until Friday, June 1. The 2017 auction brought in $2,679,001 for the winning bid to support GLIDE’s mission of providing San Francisco’s most vulnerable residents with unconditional support and love.The annual Power Lunch with Warren Buffett is made possible through the support of eBay for Charity — one of the world’s largest charitable platforms, which helps millions of eBay users support the causes they care about. To date, more than $26 million has been raised, which is the only charity power lunch offered by Mr. Buffett. The winning bidder and up to seven friends will have the opportunity to dine with Mr. Buffett at Smith & Wollensky in New York City.“We are grateful to Warren Buffett and eBay for enabling us to reach thousands with our programs and support,” said GLIDE’s Co-Founder and Minister of Liberation Reverend Cecil Williams. “In a world filled today with discord and division, GLIDE offers unconditional love, unconditional support and welcomes every person from every background to our community so that they can heal, learn, live and thrive.”Bidding for this year’s Power Lunch begins at 7:30 pm PDT on Sunday, May 27 and ends at 7:30 pm PDT on Friday, June 1. Bidding starts at $25,000 and all bidders must be pre-qualified prior. To pre-qualify, visit: eBay.com/GLIDE.For over 50 years, regardless of the political environment or changes in the economy, GLIDE has stood with the most vulnerable, including poor people, those with illness, people of color, immigrants, as well as all families and children fleeing war and oppression. Despite the rhetoric and fear in the world today, GLIDE remains a place for all of those in need to find a warm meal, access to health care and shelter, childcare and family services, and someone to advocate for them. GLIDE serves roughly 750,000 meals a year through its Daily Free Meals program.“We help the most marginalized become stable and lift themselves out of poverty, addiction and social isolation – regardless of gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation and socioeconomic background,” said GLIDE President and CEO Karen Hanrahan. “Warren Buffett’s generosity provides direct support to help the disenfranchised transform their lives. It allows GLIDE to remain a driving force for racial and economic equity in this city and beyond, and to reinforce our efforts to build legions of change agents.”“GLIDE really takes people who have hit rock bottom and helps bring them back, said Warren Buffett. “They’ve been doing it for decades. If I can help out by raising some money for them, then I enjoy doing it”“eBay enables consumers to shop with purpose, and through our platform tens of thousands of non-profit organizations raise funds for a wide range of causes and issues. We are honored to continue our partnership with GLIDE for this iconic auction and help in its mission of alleviating the suffering of those under the debilitating grasp of poverty,” said eBay’s President and CEO Devin Wenig. “eBay’s community embodies the steadfast dedication to our goal of raising a billion dollars for charities by 2020.”As host of the annual Power Lunch with Warren Buffett since 2004, Alan Stillman, founder of Smith & Wollensky, has generously donated at least $10,000 each year. Smith & Wollensky has been called “the quintessential New York steakhouse” by Gourmet Magazine and “the steakhouse to end all arguments” by The New York Times.The Annual Power Lunch with Warren Buffett Charity Auction was conceived in 2000 by the late Susie Buffett, who long maintained a strong affinity for GLIDE’s efforts to provide dignity and opportunity to all people, regardless of income, gender, religion, political persuasion or any other factor. Over the past 18 years, the winning bids have ranged from $25,000 (prior to eBay’s involvement) to $3,456,789. The Power Lunch often brings in over 10% of GLIDE’s budget. Funds raised go directly to support GLIDE’s programs, which help people overcome hunger, poverty, homelessness and debilitating health challenges as well as social isolation and disempowerment. Last year’s auction brought in $2,679,001; the past decade has seen all winning bids come in at more than $1 million.eBay, which will host the auction for the 16th year in a row, will augment its support for GLIDE in 2018 with additional donations and an employee volunteer event.For more information about GLIDE’s 19th Annual eBay Auction for Power Lunch with Warren Buffett, please contact GLIDE at (415) 674-6060, Buffett@GLIDE.org or visit eBay.com/GLIDE. For more information about GLIDE please visit GLIDE.org..last_img read more

Read More »

Emera selling three natural gas power plants in New England for 780M

first_imgHALIFAX — Emera Inc. has signed a deal to sell its three natural gas-fired power plants in New England to an affiliate of the Carlyle Group for $780 million.The Nova Scotia-based company says proceeds from the sale will be used to reduce debt and for capital investment.Emera CEO Scott Balfour says the deal, worth US$590 million, increases the company’s financial flexibility.Together, the Bridgeport Energy, Tiverton Power and Rumford Power plants in the deal have the capacity to generate approximately 1,100 megawatts of power.Carlyle Group’s Matt O’Connor says the three additional plants will make it one of the region’s largest owners of power generation facilities.The sale is subject to the regulatory approvals of the U.S. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, and under the provisions of the U.S. Hart-Scott-Rodino Antitrust Act.It is expected to close in first quarter next year.Companies in this story: (TSX:EMA)The Canadian Presslast_img read more

Read More »

Albertas economic downturn putting pressure on groups that help people in need

EDMONTON – Alberta’s economic downturn is putting the squeeze on charities as growing numbers of unemployed seek help and others cut back on discretionary spending.Demand is up at food banks in Calgary, Edmonton and Fort McMurray, swollen by people who have recently lost their jobs in the oilpatch or by others who were laid off last year and have burned through their savings and credit.Capt. Pam Goodyear of the Salvation Army says requests for help are up by as much as 30 per cent in the province from last year. Smaller communities are being hard hit.“It is people who have lost their jobs and never had to ask for help before,” Goodyear said Monday. “Some are looking for emergency food, help with utilities, help with rent.”Last month, Alberta’s seasonally adjusted unemployment rate was 7.4 per cent — up from 4.6 for the same time in 2015. Some economists believe the jobless rate could grow higher this year.The Calgary Food Bank said it distributed food last month for 13,000 people — a jump of 24 per cent from the previous year.Shawna Ogston, a food bank spokeswoman, said the number of new clients was up by 43 per cent.“It’s your neighbour, it is your friend, it is your family,” she said. “You have to wonder what 2016 is going to bring.”The oil slump is also affecting a major source of funding for the STARS air ambulance service in Alberta. For the first time in 23 years, the non-profit agency is predicting it will not sell all the tickets for its annual lottery that includes homes, cars and cash.STARS, which is partly funded by the province, depends on lottery proceeds for about one-third of its budget. Last year, the agency netted $11 million from ticket sales.“It is the economy and the lack of discretionary cash,” said STARS president Andrea Robertson. “We are going to have to look at new ways of raising money.”Some charities are reporting that cash donations from corporations and the public have been up, especially over the holiday season. The hope is that the donations will keep coming and will be enough to cover demand if the economy doesn’t improve this year.“Without being pessimistic we are definitely preparing for the worst,” Ogston said.Goodyear said the already frugal Salvation Army is planning to tighten its belt in Alberta for the coming fiscal year, which begins in April.The charity is setting the same fundraising goal as 2015 and is already looking at how to spend what it raises to benefit more people.People who need help may get a little less, she said.“We are nervous about what is coming.”Note to readers: This is a corrected story. A previous version referred to the STARS president as Andrea Robinson. by John Cotter, The Canadian Press Posted Feb 29, 2016 11:45 am MDT Last Updated Feb 29, 2016 at 4:25 pm MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email Alberta’s economic downturn putting pressure on groups that help people in need read more

Read More »

Canadas largest academic gathering kicks off at Brock

Jane Koustas, Brock’s Academic Convenor for Congress 2014, at the May 23 opening reception at Rodman HallCanada’s largest academic gathering officially kicked off on Friday night in Niagara at an evening reception at Brock’s Rodman Hall Art Centre in downtown St. Catharines.Organized by the Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences, Congress brings together more than 8,500 scholars, students and policy-makers to share ideas and shape the Canada of tomorrow.The event opened with a performance by the Ohnia:kara drum group in a tent set up for the occasion behind Rodman Hall.In his welcoming remarks, Brock President Jack Lightstone welcomed all of those in attendance and encouraged everyone to feel at home. He also spoke about the uniqueness of Niagara’s location on an international border and to the significance of boundaries between cultures and academic disciplines.Lightstone’s remarks were then followed by a Territory Welcome from Gary Parker of the Tonawanda Seneca Territory.The theme of Congress 2014, “Borders without Boundaries” focuses on the links between communities and universities, on U.S.-Canada relations, on dynamics between rural and urban spaces, and on the creation and dissemination of knowledge in the digital world.“This year’s theme reflects the opportunity that Congress brings to explore ideas, beyond traditional boundaries – disciplinary, historical, cultural or social,” said Antonia Maioni, President of the Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences. “And it seems to me fitting that we’re able to do this here at Brock, this is what Brock does best.”Congress consists of eight days of meetings, panel presentations, keynote speeches, and more than 2,500 events. This year’s gathering will feature more than 10,000 papers presented by delegates from 75 associations. Beyond the academic discussions, a wide array of panels, performances and exhibits will be free and open to the public.“The Congress for me is the spring harvest,” said Chad Gaffield, President, Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council. “We invest in research and the development of talented people and we try to make connections across society, but the Congress gives us a chance to really se the fruits of those investments.”“It gives us a chance to hear about the latest research results. It gives us a chance to meet students who are benefitting from our support. And it gives us a chance to really engage with the larger society.”The event attracts delegates from every province and territory, the U.S., and around the world. It also has the potential to pump millions of dollars into the local economy.The Ottawa-based Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences says Congress puts between $9 million and $12 million into the local economy, based on spending that includes hotel rooms, meals, transportation, tourism, shopping and so on.– Congress 2014 at Brock by the numbersRuns for seven days from Saturday, May 24 to Friday, May 30Attendees, on average, spend about three days at the weeklong gatheringGuests have booked 3,000 room-nights at five St. Catharines and 10 Niagara Falls hotels1,500 guests every night of the conference in residences on Brock’s campus110 paid contractor positions for students, alumni, and community membersRecruited more than 400 Brock and community volunteers to help out at the eventBrock’s “Congress Plus” program includes 30 events (theatre, art, concerts, lectures) that are free and open to the publicThe Big Thinking lecture series, featuring eight notable scholars, is free and open to everyoneCongreLicious menu with more than a dozen downtown restaurants, in partnership with the St. Catharines Downtown Association read more

Read More »

Race hate law changes opposed

first_img Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagram Representatives of the Indigenous, Greek, Jewish, Chinese, Arab and Korean communities met this week in Canberra with more than 80 members of the Federal Parliament from the Coalition, Labor, Greens and Independents in order to express their strong opposition to the government’s plans to weaken the existing Federal law against racial vilification.Amongst others they met the Leader of the Federal Opposition Bill Shorten, his Deputy Tanya Plibersek, the Shadow Attorney-General Mark Dreyfus, Labor parliamentarians Anthony Albanese and Maria Vamvakinou, Senators Richard Di Natale from the Greens, ALP Senate leader Penny Wong, Phillip Ruddock, Arthur Sinodinos and other Liberal parliamentarians, as well as SA Independent Senator Nick Xenophon. Due to other commitments, Attorney-General George Brandis did not meet the delegation of the community groups.“We were pleasantly surprised by the statements of support we received across the party political divide in favour of leaving the existing law as it is”, said George Vellis. co-ordinator of the Australian Hellenic Council.“If anything, the opposition that was expressed to the government’s proposals was even stronger than we heard previously. Most of the Coalition MPs we met with expressed disapproval of the government’s exposure draft to change the legislation, and voiced deep misgivings about the government’s entire approach to this issue.”It is understood that the government received more than 5,300 submissions from the public in response to its exposure draft, almost all of which were strongly critical of it.“With the exception of any submissions that were made in confidence, all of these submissions should be made available to the public on the Attorney-General’s website in the interests of having an informed and open debate,” George Vellis concluded.The Leader of the Opposition Bill Shorten, after his meeting with representatives of the various community groups, reiterated again his rejection of the proposed changes of Section 18C of the Racial Discrimination Act and called upon Prime Minister Tony Abbott and Attorney-General George Brandis to abandon altogether their plans to open the door to racism, as he said.“Ethnic community groups have told Tony Abbott they oppose the weakening of legal protections against racism and he must abandon his plans immediately”, said the Labor leader. The community groups that were represented in Canberra this week were the National Congress of Australia’s First Peoples, the Arab Council Australia, the Chinese Australian Services Society, the Korean Society of Sydney, the Cypriot Society of NSW, the Australian Hellenic Council, the Chinese Australian Forum, and the Council of Australian Jewry.According to Fairfax Media, Attorney-General George Brandis is working on a further winding back of his proposed law changes, due to an effective grassroots community campaign.His expected move will come after an original back down in March, when he was forced by cabinet to soften his original plans. This has come as a result of protests by the community and by Coalition MPs in marginal seats with a substantial presence of ethnic communities. last_img read more

Read More »

Real Good You Guys Soonish

first_imgLet us know what you like about Geek by taking our survey. Let’s face it, we’re in the future. And it’s kind of cool, but has a lot of stuff in it that sucks. We wanted Star Trek/Back to the Future Part II, but instead got Metal Gear Solid/Max Headroom. No significant space travel, no personal flying or teleportation, no fusion reactors, nothing really worth looking at and saying we’re in the future (except for whatever device you’re reading this on). There are reasons the cool stuff hasn’t gotten here, though, and a cartoonist who makes a lot of jokes about economists and boners wrote a book about it.Soonish: Ten Emerging Technologies The Will Improve And/Or Ruin Everything is the newest book by Kelly and Zach Weinersmith, the latter of which draws Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal. It was a crowdfunded project (full disclosure: I backed it, just like I backed their single-use monocle two years ago) that’s been successfully funded, written, edited, and produced. That means it’s a book you can buy like a normal book, not just back it as a project that will hopefully pay off later.It’s a meticulously researched, dryly humorous dive into ten technologies that have a lot of potential that’s absurdly far off and might be impossible. Fusion power, space elevators, and smart matter could change the world, but only after a few more decades of science nerds beating their heads against them and failing repeatedly.If you’re a fan of SMBC, you’ll recognize the book’s humor. Lots of speculation, lots of prodding at nerds and the economics of science, and lots of oddly cheery fatalism. It’s also sprinkled with some fresh SMBC-style comic panels to drive points home, so every few pages you can expect to see some scientists connected by their braces or some robot despairing its purpose.It’s also, really informative. Remarkably so. For all the weird jokes and tangents, Soonish is heavily researched with extensive citations for the dozens of scientists the Weinersmiths talked to and the dozens more books and papers they read about the different technologies.  You will actually learn something reading this, even if what you learn is about some very experimental projects and why they won’t work.For instance, one of the first subjects Soonish covers is space travel and why it’s so hard to do it. The magnitudes of cost needed to get anything out of Earth’s orbit is breathtaking, and every way to reduce that cost has lots of problems attached. Spaceplanes? You gotta get it up there. Space cannons? Would probably kill any living organism that tries to travel in it. Giant ramp? Construction scale that dwarfs the Great Wall of China.A space elevator is one of the most promising potential technologies for space travel, and it’s fundamentally ridiculous. The idea is to run a tether between a point on earth and a geosynchronous satellite or platform in orbit. Once you do that, actually getting anything up into space is just a matter of climbing the rope. It would be slower than a rocket, but much more reliable and much, much cheaper to do. The problem is what you actually use to make that tether, and how you would keep it from breaking. My first guess would be nanotubes, but Soonish explains exactly why that isn’t very likely (we can’t really produce them long enough to work). It also explains why other materials are a bad idea, and all the ways the space elevator could fail.And, because it also explains how the other methods of getting objects into space could fail too, a space elevator still sounds like the most likely idea. Welcome to the land of cheery fatalism. The future might be coming, but we have a lot of reasons why it won’t work. That’s Soonish in a nutshell, and it’s really interesting.Soonish is a real book you can get in a store or online, including in ebook or audiobook forms. It’s $18 and full of really interesting explanations of some of science’s best bad ideas being explored.It’s real good you guys. Stay on targetcenter_img Real There You Guys: Ready Player One and Nostalgia as Generational PoisonReal Good You Guys: ThinkGeek’s Bags of Holding (Fast Travel and M… last_img read more

Read More »

Possible ice snow may complicate this evenings commute

first_imgSnowpocalypse coming this evening?Probably not. In fact, there’ll be less snow than was earlier expected, according to the National Weather Service and Steve Pierce, The Columbian’s weather blogger.But folks headed home from work this evening do need to beware of slippery roads.The latest NWS forecast calls for a mix of light snow, up to one inch in Vancouver, and freezing rain, possibly one-tenth of an inch, rolling in at 6 to 7 p.m. this evening, Julia Ruthford, meteorologist/forecaster, said Monday night. That snow-ice pattern likely will continue until around midnight Tuesday in Vancouver. The weather should return to the typical rainy winter pattern on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, she said.Heading east past Camas and Washougal into the Columbia River Gorge, more snow and cold weather are forecast.Monday night was dry with breezy east winds in east Vancouver, Camas and Washougal — gusts of up to 30 mph or so — and conditions even more windy heading into the Columbia River Gorge, which will stay colder longer.But clouds were expected to move in from the south this afternoon, causing an approximately six-hour window of snow and ice until the ground and air warms above freezing, Ruthford said.last_img read more

Read More »

POLICE LOG for September 29 Cops Called On Teens Going DoorToDoor Asking

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Here are highlights from the Wilmington Police Log for Saturday, September 29, 2018:Police notified the Water Department of water leaking near hydrant on Barbara Avenue. (8:48am)A caller is concerned that a dog he recently sold to a resident is not being cared for properly. Message left for Animal Control Officer. (9:13am)A car overheated in the McDonald’s drive-thru. Vehicle was towed. (2:50pm)A Sachem Circle resident reported two teenage females going door-to-door, asking for donations for victims of the gas explosions in Lawrence and Andover. Females described as 16 year-olds, one with blue hair. Police located. Parents came to pick up juveniles. All were advised about procedure for acquiring a solicitor’s permit. (3:50pm)A mother reported her son is being bullied. (6:11pm)(DISCLAIMER: This information is public information.  An arrest does not constitute a conviction.  Any arrested person is innocent until proven guilty.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedPOLICE LOG for August 21: Driver Issued Summons; Solicitors Going Door To Door Without Required PermitIn “Police Log”POLICE LOG for September 3: Driveway Paving Solicitors; Skate Park Tagged; WPD Assist With Pick-Up At SchoolsIn “Police Log”POLICE LOG for August 20: Wilmington Man Arrested; Car vs. Tree; Concession Stand VandalizedIn “Police Log”last_img read more

Read More »

Artist brilliantly remasters Super Metroid with modernday graphics

first_imgIt’s a commonly accepted notion that Super Metroid is ranked as one of the best games of all time. The third game in the Metroid franchise, it released way back in 1994 on the Super Nintendo when the game industry paid attention to things called “bits.” Super Metroid had 16 of them. Though indie games recently re-popularized pixelated, “retro” graphics, and though graphics shouldn’t be the biggest determining factor as to what makes a good game, no one argues with HD remakes or visual upgrades.We’re not getting a remake of Super Metroid, but DeviantART user TJ Townsend shows us what it would be like.The original screenshot Townsend spruced up was cobbled together from multiple in-game screenshots in order to get a 16:9 aspect ratio on which he could perform his magic. Like the background sprites taken from the game, Samus, Mother Brain, and the Metroid are all their proper selves as well. Townsend does point out that the Metroid wasn’t in that area in the game, but it’s not inconceivable that a Metroid could wander into Mother Brain’s lair.Best of all, Townsend made a video of the painstaking process, so you can watch the screenshot transform before your eyes. Mercifully, the video is sped up to a bearable speed, even though it still clocks in at just over 14 minutes. Townsend states that the image took around 50 to 60 hours of work, and contained over 500 layers.Nintendo doesn’t usually go the HD remake route with its games (though it does occasionally), but thanks to Townsend, an HD remake of Super Metroid is now something we can’t stop thinking about. That is, until a certain other remastered game gets released.last_img read more

Read More »

Craft for generations

first_imgShrujan, a grass-root, craft-revival, and income-generation organization, established in 1969, organised the largest exhibition of Hand Embroidered Products from 05 July to 08 July in the Aga Khan Hall. The exhibition focused mainly on saris, shawls, and dupattas, among other garments.  Besides displaying 16 different styles of Hand Embroidery, made by craftswomen from 10 communities of the Kutch region of Gujarat, the exhibition presented a whole new array of vibrant colours and high-quality fabric to enthral any person with an eye and appreciation for art, textile, or embroidery. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Hiral Dayal, Trustee Shrujan, said, ‘Each of the 16 hand-embroidery styles from this region resembles a piece of jewellery. More than 95% of our customers who appreciate the uniqueness of this art have placed great trust in us for delivery of the best-quality and highly durable hand-embroidered finished products.’ In addition to focusing on a new range of designs for saris, shawls, dupattas, and other garments, the exhibition showcased new styles of not only garments but also stitches. Visitors to the Shrujan Hand Embroidery Exhibition found an eclectic mix of traditional embroidery on contemporary apparels, including men’s kurtas as well as silk and woolen jackets. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with Netflix The years of research on hand embroidery from Kutch and its communities was evident on the resplendent display of stitches and vibrant colors. Besides its classic range, the highlights of the event were colourful, embroidered Maheshwari dupattas and stoles; and tie-and-dye skirts and cholis. Hand-embroidered fabrics that 3,500 craftswomen living in 100 remote villages of Kutch have fashioned into high-quality products were appreciated by all. At its previous exhibition, Shrujan presented the first book and instructional film entitled Under the Embroidered Sky: the Embroidery of the Ahirs of Kutch, that showed the research work and documentation and filming of the embroidery styles of other communities. For countless generations, this craft had been passed on from the mother to the daughter. However, with the oral tradition of teaching and learning falling out of favor, exploration of other methods of safeguarding the wisdom of the craft has become imperative.last_img read more

Read More »

Why the Use of PETCT in Radiation Therapy Requires Thinking Outside the

first_img The intersection between PET/CT and radiation therapy is widening. And it is doing so in unanticipated ways.You might expect this hybrid’s potential against cancer to be found in its natural proclivity for the visualization of malignant tumors, one that has grown more sensitive with the advance of PET technology. Or perhaps you might predict an enhanced ability to see the earliest signs of cancer from the increased sensitivity or localization possible through advances in CT. You might also expect the use of this modality’s unique combination of functional and anatomical data to be leveraged in the planning of therapy, possibly in place or in combination with CT simulators now in use.But there is where you would be wrong.Little has come from more than a decade of forward thinking in the latter direction and little is likely to come of it. That does not mean, however, that PET/CT will not have a role to play in the planning of cancer therapy. Far from it.PET/CT’s biggest opportunity in this regard may stem from the insights this modality can provide about the metabolic pathways of this disease. This potential has been taking shape over the last several years in studies of an enzyme implicated in the occurrence — and treatment — of cancer.The enzyme, called deoxycytidine kinase, is associated with certain types of cancer. One of the first reports of how PET/CT might use this enzyme to visualize and monitor cancer surfaced about six years ago in the Journal of Nuclear Medicine. The research, conducted in mice, has since been extended to human subjects. Plans for formal clinical trials are now in the works.The development of a PET agent for this enzyme is still years in the future, as is a commercial radiopharmaceutical that might be widely available. Neither one is a sure thing. But the research may demonstrate how PET/CT could make its long-awaited impact on therapy planning.In the meantime PET/CT is proving useful as an adjunct to more conventional efforts to visualize and destroy cancer. Recently, the hybrid has been used effectively by research teams in England to identify and guide the removal of cancer cells that remain after the treatment of head and neck cancer. Its use in tracking down elusive malignancies might be leveraged to eliminate the need for patients to undergo invasive post-treatment surgery.It is encouraging to see such reports, just as it is sobering to realize that PET/CT has not lived up to past expectations, ones that would seem less difficult to achieve.Peer-reviewed literature abounds with the potential once imagined for PET/CT in radiotherapy planning. Just years after the these two modalities were put together, oncologists and radiation therapists began exploring how the unique combination of structural and functional information might afford better targeting of tumors, according to their distribution, size and metabolic activity.More than a decade ago the idea appeared of applying these capabilities in the form of a dedicated PET/CT simulator. One paper, published in 2005, concluded that such a simulator could reduce radiation exposure of healthy tissues, thereby intensifying the dose administered to malignancies. Already two years earlier the idea of using PET/CT as a treatment planning tool for conformal radiation therapy had been proven feasible. The paper describing this research, while noting the potential for reduced risk due to minimized dose being applied to healthy tissues, concluded that “the impact on treatment outcome remains to be demonstrated.”And therein may lay the rub. While the potential of PET/CT and radiation therapy has long been recognized, the challenges standing in the way of its widespread use for the most obvious application in radiation therapy have been formidable. These may be less technological than political and logistical.First and foremost is the lack of reimbursement for the use of PET/CT in radiotherapy. Second is the fact that PET/CT and radiotherapy planning are done in two different departments — one nuclear medicine; the other radiation therapy. Third is staff training.While there may be other reasons, these would seem difficult enough. Consequently, realization of PET/CT’s potential in therapy would seem to require thinking outside the simulators — and turf — of radiation therapy planning, as it is practiced today, and more in line with the metabolic pathways that that define the strengths of this hybrid.Editor’s note: This is the second blog in a series of four by industry consultant Greg Freiherr on Where Molecular Imaging Fits in Managing the Cancer Patient. To read the first blog, “How to Achieve the Quantitative Promise of PET/CT,” click here. Videos | Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a read more News | Computed Tomography (CT) | June 17, 2019 International Working Group Releases New Multiple Myeloma Imaging Guidelines An International Myeloma Working Group (IMWG) has developed the first set of new recommendations in 10 years for… read more Graphic courtesy Pixabay FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 News | PET-CT | August 15, 2019 United Imaging Announces First U.S. Clinical Installation of uExplorer Total-body PET/CT United Imaging announced that its uExplorer total-body positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) system… read more Blog | Greg Freiherr, Industry Consultant | Molecular Imaging| April 13, 2016 Why the Use of PET/CT in Radiation Therapy Requires Thinking Outside the Box X-ray images such as the one on the left fail to indicate many cases of advanced bone destruction caused by multiple myeloma, says the author of new guidelines on imaging for patients with myeloma and related disorders. Image courtesy of Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center. News | PET-CT | June 19, 2019 United Imaging Announces First U.S. Clinical Install of uMI 550 Digital PET/CT United Imaging announced the first U.S. clinical installation of the uMI 550 Digital positron emission tomography/… read more News | PET-CT | February 06, 2019 SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT: Examining the Value of Digital PET/CT Technological advancements in positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) offer both clinicians and pat read more center_img News | PET-CT | March 06, 2019 Siemens Healthineers Announces First U.S. Install of Biograph Vision PET/CT Siemens Healthineers’ new Biograph Vision positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) system has been… read more Technology | PET-CT | January 23, 2019 FDA Clears United Imaging Healthcare uExplorer Total-Body Scanner January 23, 2019 — United Imaging Healthcare (United Imaging) announced U.S. read more News | Radiation Therapy | May 31, 2019 RefleXion Opens New Manufacturing Facility for Biology-guided Radiotherapy Platform RefleXion Medical recently announced the opening of its new manufacturing facility at its headquarters in Hayward,… read more News | Radiopharmaceuticals and Tracers | July 01, 2019 Bracco Imaging Acquires Blue Earth Diagnostics Bracco Imaging S.p.A. has signed a definitive agreement to acquire Blue Earth Diagnostics, a molecular imaging company… read more Raza Alvi explains use of PET to image cardiac sarcoidosisVideo Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 9:09Loaded: 1.80%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -9:09 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. News | Radiopharmaceuticals and Tracers | June 05, 2019 BGN Technologies Introduces Novel Medical Imaging Radioisotope Production Method BGN Technologies, the technology transfer company of Ben-Gurion University (BGU), introduced a novel method for… read more Related Content Greg Freiherr, Industry Consultant Greg Freiherr has reported on developments in radiology since 1983. He runs the consulting service, The Freiherr Group.last_img read more

Read More »

Housing Starts Fall Permits Up in March

first_img Construction Permits Starts 2017-04-18 Seth Welborn Share April 18, 2017 571 Views Housing Starts Fall, Permits Up in Marchcenter_img Despite a strong February, housing starts have fallen almost seven percent in March. According to Tuesday’s New Residential Construction report from the Census Bureau and the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), housing starts dropped to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 1.215 million, a 6.8 percent decrease from February’s 1.303 million, but many outlooks are still positive. The March housing starts rate is 9.2 percent higher year-over-year.“Today’s Census Bureau report for March is good news for the housing market,” said First American Chief Economist Mark Fleming. “Millennial household formation is beginning to have meaningful impact on housing demand and will likely only increase. Currently, I estimate that the amount of housing supply necessary to just keep pace with demand is probably around 1.5 million housing units a year.”Single-family starts fell six percent in March, to an annual rate of 821,000 from February’s rate of 875,000, which was the fastest monthly rate since the Great Recession.Although sing-family starts dropped, single-family permits posted the third largest annual pace since the recession. Permits in March grew 3.6 percent to 1.26 million from February’s 1.216 million, and grew year-over-year by 17 percent. According to the report, housing completions were up in March by 3.2 percent, totaling 1.205 million, over February’s 1.168 million. This is a year-over-year increase from March 2016 by 13.4 percent.The National Association of Homebuilders (NAHB) reports that this is much in line with Monday’s NAHB/ Wells Fargo Housing Market Index (HMI). The March HMI was unusually high, and the NAHB predicts more growth throughout the year. NAHB reports that there is a continuing demand for home construction, although builders have faced several challenges such as high regulatory costs and increasing material prices.Regionally, the South was the best performing region, with a three percent month-over-month gain in housing starts. The Northeast showed no change, while the West dropped six percent, and the Midwest dropped 35 percent.Read the full Census Bureau/HUD survey results here. in Daily Dose, Featured, News, Originationlast_img read more

Read More »

Grace expects Greinke trade to have emotional impa

first_img Grace expects Greinke trade to have emotional impact The 5: Takeaways from the Coyotes’ introduction of Alex Meruelo Just as preseason predictions mean little when the regular season gets underway, so too do preseason records. While the Cardinals have started 2-0 in the exhibition portion of their schedule, there’s another number that should be the source of some optimism as they look to improve.Ten — as in the number of straight seasons a last-place team has gone on to make it to the postseason the following year. “You always want to be in that position,” Dockett said of the Cardinals being considered underdogs in the division. “When you’re sitting at the top everybody is coming with their best, trying to tee off on you. Sometimes it’s good to be at the top, sometimes it’s not.”The Cardinals are certainly not sitting ‘at the top’ heading into the 2013 season, nor should they be. Losers of 10 of their last 11 games to close out the 2012 season, Arizona is in the midst of establishing a new identity under new head coach Bruce Arians and new general manager Steve Keim.But regardless of what transpired in the offseason, Dockett noted that predictions hold little weight when it comes time for the regular season to start, because they are just that, predictions.“I look at it like nobody is on top,” said Dockett. “The records are 0-0. Everybody has to go out and play 16 games. We’re just trying to focus on ourselves and getting better as individuals, as coaches, as a team and as one unit. “I’m not worried about finishing in last place last year, because there’s a lot of change. There’s a lot of new teammates, a new coach, a new general manager. There’s a lot of excitement. Our focus is on getting the Cardinals better.” As a nine-year veteran, Arizona Cardinals defensive tackle Darnell Dockett has experienced just about all the highs and lows one can have in an NFL career.He’s reached a Super Bowl (2008), won back-to-back division titles (2008 and 2009), played on last-place teams (2006, 2010 and 2012) and also suffered through campaigns where 8-8 just wasn’t good enough (2007 and 2011).So while the preseason talk has centered on the San Francisco 49ers and Seattle Seahawks being favorites not only in the NFC West but in the conference, as well, count Dockett among those more than content to play second-fiddle in the headlines this time of year. Top Stories center_img 0 Comments   Share   Derrick Hall satisfied with D-backs’ buying and selling – / 24 Former Cardinals kicker Phil Dawson retireslast_img read more

Read More »

Ottawa County law enforcement officials join Rep Price for 911 ceremony at

first_img08Sep Ottawa County law enforcement officials join Rep. Price for 9/11 ceremony at state Capitol Categories: News LANSING – Ottawa County Sheriff Gary Rosema and Capt. Valerie Weiss joined State Rep. Amanda Price today as her guest during the annual House of Representatives’ 9/11 ceremony at the state Capitol.“With his over 42 years in law enforcement, including 22 years as Ottawa County sheriff, it was an honor to have Sheriff Rosema as well as Capt. Weiss with us while honoring our first responders,” said Rep. Price, R-Park Township. “They’ve selflessly dedicated themselves to Ottawa County.”Today’s event recognized law enforcement, fire department, emergency medical staff and U.S. military members, during which a ceremonial bell was rung for each of the 12 first responders and three members of the U.S. military from Michigan who died in the line of duty. Guests of state representatives and family members of the deceased were also in attendance, as the Van Buren County Sheriff’s Department honor guard and chief chaplain from the Berrien County Sheriff’s Department also participated in the ceremony.last_img read more

Read More »

Rep Vaupel to host indistrict office hours April 21

first_img18Apr Rep. Vaupel to host in-district office hours April 21 Categories: Vaupel News State Rep. Hank Vaupel of Handy Township will host office hours in Fowlerville, Hartland and Howell on Friday, April 21.Rep. Vaupel will meet with residents at the following locations:Fowlerville: 2:30 to 3:30 p.m. at Fowlerville Farms, 941 S. Grand Ave.;Hartland: 4 to 5 p.m. at Kahuna Coffee, 1836 Old U.S. Highway 23; andHowell: 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at All Star Coney Island, 934 S. Michigan Ave.“I find the information I hear from residents of our communities to be vital in the way I represent them at the Capitol,” Rep. Vaupel said. “Meeting with the people I serve and hearing what they have to say is one of the most enjoyable aspects of this job.”Rep. Vaupel hosts district office hours on the third Friday of every month. Residents who are unable to attend, but would like to voice concerns or ideas, may contact Rep. Vaupel’s office by phone at (517) 373-8835 or by email at HankVaupel@house.mi.gov.last_img read more

Read More »

Reilly bill would require colleges uphold First Amendment

first_img25May Reilly bill would require colleges uphold First Amendment Categories: Reilly News Representative John Reilly, R-Oakland, has introduced legislation to strengthen First Amendment protections for citizens attending public colleges and universities.Rep. Reilly noted that numerous free speech court cases against universities in Michigan have either been settled out of court or ruled against the universities.“The Legislature has not only the authority, but a compelling duty to protect the free speech rights of its citizens and to shield its taxpaying citizens from unnecessary financial liability arising from ambiguity in existing policies,” he said.Reilly noted a pending case against Kellogg Community College in which a student was handcuffed and jailed for circulating copies of the U.S. Constitution.  He also pointed to recently settled cases against Grand Valley State University, Western Michigan University and Eastern Michigan University.  In addition, he noted a ruling in Doe v. Michigan in which the court found a University of Michigan policy forbidding the “stigmatizing or victimizing” of individuals or groups a violation of protected speech rights under the First Amendment.“It shouldn’t be necessary to codify the First Amendment to the Constitution of the United States and corresponding speech protections in our state Constitution, but sadly, these ongoing, pervasive problems prove that we do,” Rep. Reilly said. “These cases simply codify the court rulings that have consistently upheld the right to free speech on public campuses.”House Bill 4656, cosponsored by Reps. Hoitenga, Hornberger, Iden, Johnson, Kelly, Lilly, Lucido, Noble, Robinson, Runestad and Victory, would require Michigan’s 43 public colleges and universities to adopt free speech policies that include:An affirmation that the school strives to ensure the greatest degree of intellectual freedom and free expression.An affirmation of the right to free speech.An affirmation of the right to assembly.An affirmation of the right to protest, provided it does not infringe on the rights of others to engage in or listen to others.An affirmation that the campus is open to any speaker whom students, student groups or faculty invite.An affirmation that the public areas of campuses are traditional public forums, open on the same terms to any speaker.An affirmation to prohibit discrimination against belief-based student groups.An affirmation that this policy supersedes any previous policy.It would further require the schools to make this policy known to students, professors, administrators, campus police and residence life officials.House Bill 4656 was referred to the House Oversight Committee.###last_img read more

Read More »

Representatives Lilly and García announce community mental health forum

first_img15Feb Representatives Lilly and García announce community mental health forum Categories: Garcia News,Garcia Photos,News,Photos Representatives Jim Lilly (R- Park Township) and Daniela García (R-Holland) invite Ottawa County residents to attend an upcoming forum on community mental health issues.The forum is scheduled for Friday, Feb. 23 from 5 to 6:30 p.m. at the Fillmore Complex (Main Conference Room), 12220 Fillmore St. in West Olive.  Guest speakers will include MDHHS Deputy Director of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities’ Lynda Zeller, Executive Director of Ottawa County Community Mental Health’s Lynne Doyle, and the CEO of Lakeshore Regional Entity’s Jeff Brown.“Our offices have listened to our communities’ concerns on community mental health and I believe this forum will offer valuable insight into the issue.” Lilly said. “Representative García has been leading the charge on this issue in Lansing and I’m honored to welcome her into the 89th District to help facilitate meaningful conversation.”García said: “Representative Lilly and I understand how important it is to ensure all Ottawa County residents have the adequate mental health services they need.  This forum is a great opportunity for the community to voice their concerns, share their experiences, and better understand the issue from every level of government.”The event is open to the public. Anyone unable to attend is encouraged to contact Representative Lilly’s office at 517-373-0838 or Representative García’s office at 517-373-0830.last_img read more

Read More »

Rep Allor seeks feedback from local residents

first_img Categories: Allor News 12Sep Rep. Allor seeks feedback from local residents State Rep. Sue Allor, of Wolverine, today invited people to sit down with her during office hours this month in Alcona, Alpena, Cheboygan, Iosco and Presque Isle counties.“I truly enjoy meeting with people and hearing from them on the issues we’re facing as a region and state,” Allor said. “The input and feedback I receive during these informal meetings helps me better represent our community at the Capitol.”Allor will be available at the following times and locations:Monday, Sept. 17, from 1:30 to 2:30 p.m. at Chi-Chi’s Restaurant, 409 N. Bradley Hwy. in Rogers City;Monday, Sept. 17, from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. in the Donald Newport Center, Room 106, at Alpena Community College, 665 Johnson St. in Alpena;Friday, Sept. 21, from 1 to 2 p.m. in the Commissioner’s Room at the Alcona County Courthouse, 106 5th St. in Harrisville;Friday, Sept. 21, from 3:15 to 4:15 p.m. at the Victorian Café, 216 S. Washington St. in Hale; andFriday, Sept. 28, from 1:30 to 2:30 p.m. at Wood Winds Restaurant and Pizzeria, 20812 Washington Ave. in Onaway.No appointments are necessary. Anyone unable to attend local office hours can contact Allor at (517) 373-0833 or email SueAllor@house.mi.gov.###last_img read more

Read More »