Valfresco Direkt started with delivery on the island of Krk

first_imgValfresco Direkt offers in one place the products of family farms, winemakers, olive growers and many other local producers with a long tradition in the production of healthy and quality food, as well as traditional dishes and desserts from Valfresco Cuisine. Valfresco Direct for all citizens and tourists in Istria, and at the end of June it became available for guests in Valamar’s camps on the island of Krk. Valfresco Direkt offers a wide selection of fresh local products and groceries from local producers and family farms, semi-finished and ready meals according to traditional recipes prepared in The central kitchen and distribution center of Valamar in Vinež, as well as many other supplies that are normally bought in the market.  Valamar launched its online store service in early June Valamar collaborates with more than a hundred local partners and suppliers from Istria and Kvarner, as well as Slavonia and Dalmatia, with the aim of expanding cooperation to interested partners from all parts of Croatia. Among the partners of Valfresco Direkt is the family farm Pavan Leon from Vrbnik on the island of Krk, which has been operating for twenty years, and is known for the production of pure sheep cheese, mixed cheese and cottage cheese and high quality lamb, various vegetables and wine Žlahtina.center_img Since mid-September, Valfresco Direkt service has expanded to the area Rijeka and Opatija Riviera, and from October 01, Valamar’s online store became available on the island of Krk. Valfresco Direkt delivery is ensured every day, including Sundays and holidays, and it is enough for the customer to place an order by 13 pm for the products to be delivered the next day, with the possibility of cash on delivery or card online. Interestingly, Valamar has also entered the market of private accommodation, which also offers its food offer, ie it is a web market that delivers local food and freshly prepared meals, either in their facilities such as camps, our homes for private users, and so do tourists to their apartments. Certainly a big “game changer” in our tourism and for Valamar, which thus entered the trade segment and even more strongly in the hospitality segment. Photo: Srdjan Hulak productionlast_img read more

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Criminals ignore stiff gun laws anyway

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionThe anti-gun crowd is frantic about concealed carry reciprocity. Calm down. The nice folks in “permit-less” Vermont are not gathered at the border waiting to invade New York with guns blazing. This paranoia is illogical and wasteful.Any gun purchase anywhere from a licensed seller must pass a National Instant Criminal Background check (NICS). There are 10 good reasons someone is placed in this system.It’s not permitted individuals who are visiting mayhem on their fellow citizens. They have passed an NICS background check and state screening (regardless of how onerous, like New York’s SAFE Act, or how lax, like Vermont’s).They carry to protect themselves and their loved ones. They support reciprocity in order to do likewise nationally without being criminalized. It is not so they can kill people in other states. I have owned firearms for hunting, shooting sports and personal protection for over 60 years. I, too, am horrified at the gun violence I read about daily. It’s thugs and psychotics possessing illegal firearms who are responsible.Why waste energy promoting laws that make it difficult for law-abiding citizens to possess firearms? Redirect it toward keeping guns out of the hands of those who should not. I support that.Ensure incompetent bureaucrats keep NICS up to date. (Think U.S. Air Force and Devin Kelley in Texas.) Stiffen sentences for gun crimes. Put malefactors away for a long time. (For good?) Lobby for funds to identify and treat mental illness. Address domestic abuse.Here’s a tip: If national reciprocity becomes law, you aren’t going to get shot by someone from another state with a legally concealed firearm. It’s the thug or psychotic with an illegal firearm who lives around the corner who is going to shoot you.George NigrinyScotia  More from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?Schenectady teens accused of Scotia auto theft, chase; Ended in Clifton Park crash, Saratoga Sheriff…EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationlast_img read more

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Just give in to NRA and arm school kids

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionI have a common sense solution to school shootings. At the start of the school day, each student will be given a loaded handgun, .22 caliber for grades K-6, .38 caliber for grades 7-12. The guns will be returned at the conclusion of the school day. Problem solved.The only way to stop a bad kid with a gun are good kids with guns. God bless the NRA and its spineless AR-15-loving whores in the Republican Party.Paul SatorGloversvilleMore from The Daily Gazette:Broadalbin-Perth’s Tomlinson seizing the day by competing in cross country and golf this fallEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationlast_img read more

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If unions lose Janus case, conservatives won’t like fallout

first_imgIf the Supreme Court rules against AFSCME in Janus, many unions will abandon exclusive representation altogether.Their primary motivation will be avoiding the “free rider” problem – being required to expend resources on workers who opt out of paying anything for those services.And new unions will form to compete in that abandoned space.The first unions to compete will probably be conservative.In non-bargaining Southern states that do not recognize formal union representation, organizations already exist that vie with teachers unions by offering minimal services and the promise to refrain from political activity.And right-wing foundations are paying for “organizers” to go door-to-door to convince union-represented workers to stop paying dues where they no longer have to.Would anybody really be surprised if rich and powerful funders encouraged new anti-union “unions” to more closely align members with the GOP agenda? And the big-money, right-wing plotters who have been pushing Janus are gunning for the blue states, too.“No-strike” clauses buy employers a period of guaranteed labor peace.They would be basically unenforceable if workers could quit a voluntary association to engage in a wildcat strike, or join an alternative union that eschews signed agreements to have the freedom to engage in sudden unannounced job actions.Many union organizers, frustrated by the unequal application of constitutional rights in labor relations and hungry for breakthrough strategies to revive the labor movement, will welcome this kind of chaos.Conservatives who just want to deprive unions of financial resources for short-term partisan gain should think twice about this attack – if the court rules their way, they will not like what comes next.Shaun Richman, a union organizing director, is the author of the Century Foundation report “Labor’s Bill of Rights.” More from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidation Categories: Editorial, OpinionOn Monday, the Supreme Court heard the case Janus v. AFSCME, with the fate of the labor movement seemingly in the balance.At stake are agency fees: Public-sector unions can collect fees for service from employees who don’t join the union that represents them, which the plaintiff argues is an unconstitutional act of compelled speech.The deep-pocketed backers of Janus aim to bankrupt unions and strip them of whatever power they still have.But if the court rules that an interaction a union has with the government is political speech, they might not be so happy with the results.Many have noted that such an overreaching and inconsistent decision could have unintended consequences by granting a heretofore denied constitutional right to collective bargaining and transforming thousands of workplace disputes into constitutional controversies.What the Janus backers (and most commentators) miss is that agency fees are not just compensation for the financial costs of representation, but for the political costs of representing all the members in the bargaining unit and maintaining labor peace.As AFSCME’s attorney pointed out in his oral arguments, the agency fee is routinely traded for a no-strike clause in most union contracts. Should those clauses disappear, employers will have chaos and discord on their hands.American labor laws, and the employers who benefit from them, prefer that if there’s going to be a union, only one should serve as the exclusive representative of all eligible employees in a workplace.That scheme imposes on unions a legal obligation to fairly represent all members of the bargaining unit, and a political imperative to defend the terms of any deal as “the best we could get” (even if it includes concessions on benefits and work rules).It rewards the unions with a guaranteed right to exist and a reliable base of fee-paying membership.But it rewards employers with the far more valuable guarantee of the right to direct the uninterrupted work of the enterprise while union leadership has to tamp down rank-and-file gripes and discord for the length of the contract.The combination of exclusive union representation, mandatory agency fees, no-strike clauses and “management’s rights” are the foundation of our peculiar labor relations system. Knock one part out, as the Janus plaintiffs aim to do with agency fees, and the whole system can fall apart.center_img Employers will not like the chaos that this will bring.Before this system evolved during the New Deal, multiple unions did compete in individual workplaces for dues-paying members and shop floor leadership.They would compete over who made the boldest wage and hour demands and who led the most disruptive job actions, as well as who could forge a more productive relationship with management or just flat-out take a sweetheart deal.But no deal could bring lasting labor peace, as any union cut out of the deal had a political need to disparage its terms and agitate for a fresh round of protests. To maintain production and labor peace, federal arbitrators began granting unions a “maintenance of membership” clause in contracts, which compelled union members to continue to pay dues during the terms of a collective bargaining agreement.That evolved into today’s union shop and agency fee.Public-sector labor laws, which are immediately at issue in Janus v. AFSCME, are modeled on private-sector labor law and ruled by the same bargaining dynamics. Those will eventually be followed by new unions that are more left-wing or militant (or at least crankier).They will not be satisfied with the current work rules and compensation and will have little incentive to settle.Under the current scheme, those kinds of differences of opinion are aired in winner-take-all leadership elections between competing factions.A post-Janus system of voluntary representation would encourage many opposition caucuses to break away and form alternative, minority unions for their members only.The solicitor general of Illinois – indirectly a party to the Janus case – warned in Monday’s oral arguments “that when unions are deprived of agency fees, they tend to become more militant, more confrontational.”And AFSCME’s counsel warned about the thousands of contracts that would have to be renegotiated in a climate where an agency fee is no longer a trade for a no-strike pledge, raising “an untold specter of labor unrest throughout the country.”Although Janus v. AFSCME applies to public-sector unions, this same logic applies to the majority of states that have passed “right to work” laws prohibiting mandatory union fees in the private sector.last_img read more

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Letters to the Editor for Friday, June 21

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionU.S. inflating war rationale with IranAnother day, another nation that the United States wants to wage offensive war on. Despite what several of our leaders will tell you, Iran is not a threat to the United States. Every escalation of war has actually been prompted by the United States. The United States has countless military bases surrounding all sides of Iran. And if the United States is so worried about Iran being dangerous, why did President Trump last year pull out of the Iran nuclear deal, which limited Iran’s nuclear activity and which Iran was upholding?It’s also kind of the fault of the United States that Iran is in its current situation at all.In 1953, the CIA overthrew Iran’s democratically elected government in a coup backed by the United States and installed a monarchy rule in the nation, setting it on the course to where it is now.The United States is also claiming that Iran attacked two oil tankers. There is no evidence to back this claim, and history has shown, whether it’s the Gulf of Tonkin or the Nayirah testimony or weapons of mass destruction, the U.S. government is not above planting false flags to start a war.Be it in Vietnam, Iraq, Syria, Libya or wherever, the U.S.’s regime change wars have done little to no good and have caused much harm — debt from increased military spending and countless dead American soldiers and citizens of the nations mentioned above.We must listen to the warnings from history and not allow this to happen again in Iran. Matt OillSchenectadyImmigrant license bill is to help DemsThe bill just signed by Gov. Andrew Cuomo and our state Legislature to give undocumented immigrants driver’s licenses has little to do with economics, to keep Americans safe from uninsured drivers, or because our governor wants to bring them out of the shadows. It’s for the glory of the Democratic Party.Today’s undocumented immigrant is tomorrow’s Democratic voter. So why not give them the most common form of accepted ID? Has anyone wondered why we are not being told what this license will look like? How it will differ from licenses of legal American citizens? I realized why after watching CNN this morning. It reported: “The New York attorney general has assured Gov.  Cuomo that these licenses cannot be used by ICE to track undocumented Democrats.”So I think we can assume that these licenses will look no different than those of legal residents. In the recent past, a Gazette columnist got it right when she said it’s not so much that we dislike Gov. Cuomo. We hate him. Wonder why?Cory CostanzoNiskayunaAnti-Israel letter full of inaccuraciesI am appalled at James Van Dijk’s letter of June 16. It is anti-Semitic as well as historically inaccurate. Fact-checking is needed. The desire for Israel is not a European colonial vision, rather a 2,000-year-old prayer. Jews have yearned to return to Israel for centuries; it is no “experiment.” It is mentioned in our worship and it is the concluding line of our Passover Seder, this predates European expansionism. The current state of Israel’s Jewish population is from various parts of the world; almost half come from Arab nations. The letter instills hatred rather fostering healthy resolution. Israel does not assassinate politicians or intentionally kill unarmed civilians.In defense actions following attacks, Israel has killed leaders of terrorist organizations such as Hamas. The extent of civilian casualties largely is the result of Hamas’s use of human shields, launching rockets from homes, hospitals and schools. Where is acknowledgment of Palestinian attacks on Israelis?The hateful charge that Jews are the first terrorists is anti-Semitic. Please know there were acts that preceded this, like the massacres of Jews in Hebron.I know that I speak for many when I say that I will fight for peace between Israelis and Palestinians, as well as stand up to the likes of this writer. He has every right to write letters, post them on a blog if he wants. But The Daily Gazette has a responsibility to print accurate information.Matt CutlerSchenectadyMore from The Daily Gazette:Foss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationGov. Andrew Cuomo’s press conference for Sunday, Oct. 18last_img read more

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Letters to the Editor for Wednesday, August 7

first_imgMore from The Daily Gazette:Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s press conference for Sunday, Oct. 18Foss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motorists Categories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionSantabarbara not who he says he is Assemblyman Angelo Santabarbara is a wolf in sheep’s clothing.In public view, he helps families with disabled children, but away from the public, he supports the Reproductive Health Act and denies medical care to babies who survive abortion. For unwanted babies who survive abortion, Santabarbara removes their legal rights. He takes away their right to a doctor. He takes away their right to an advocate. He takes away their right to a witness. He leaves these babies alone with an abortionist who tried to kill the baby and with a mother who paid to have the baby killed. In private, these babies were stripped of their legal rights and they have no one to protect them. I’m sure Assemblyman Santabarbara provides his family with great doctors and superior medical care, but for unwanted babies, he takes their only doctor away. In public view, Santabarbara turns to our local churches to legitimize his position and his political career. He participates in important services and gives awards to our pastors. He then plasters pictures and videos of these events all over social media, creating a huge spectacle for himself. Santabarbara, a “Catholic” who passed intrinsically evil legislation, tries to portray himself as having church approval. Santabarbara takes advantage of our pastors and the congregation, and he uses the church to get exactly what he wants: a public slate wiped clean, while the innocent victims of his policy pile up in private.Jennifer RichardsBurnt HillsGrateful to workers for storm effortsWe are writing to offer our expression of gratitude to the workers in the Schenectady city Department of Public Works and the fire department for their outstanding efforts on our behalf.On July 29, a very short but powerful storm came through our neighborhood. It brought down a tree across the street and tore off limbs on the trees in front of our house. That evening, a representative of the fire department came to the house to warn us about conditions on the street. The following morning, workers for National Grid came through and trimmed the trees so our wires would be safe. The result was that our front lawn and trash barrels were covered with broken limbs. The trash collectors were not able to do their job in our part of the street. However, they came back later in the day and completed their task. They even delivered our barrels to our front steps so we would not have to struggle to retrieve them.Later in the day, another crew came to the street and removed all of the downed limbs. They were incredibly efficient and friendly in going about their work. Not only was the street cleared and usable, but they did not leave a leaf on our front lawn.They did an excellent job and the citizens of Schenectady should be proud of their service. Certainly we are most grateful for their excellent work.William and Susan SchultzSchenectadyPeople need to be more considerateI was drawn to my neighborhood because it had so many beautiful trees. Cars are constantly speeding down our street. Once they turn onto St. David’s, you hear the gas pedal hit the floor. This is evidenced by telephone poles being run into, mailboxes being damaged and the numerous tire tracks across many lawns, as these idiots cannot even stay in their own lane. They never stop to remediate the damage they cause. On their way through, they throw their litter out of their car windows. God forbid, they just throw it away when they get home.This brings me to my next point: The garbage caused by negligent homeowners who fail to pick up leaflets, telephone directories, flyers and other random advertisements left under the flag or beneath their own mailbox.When the neighborhood was developing, it might have been ideal to have an extra box on the same side of the road. But, some of these posts hold up to 3-4 mailboxes and are not part of an apartment complex. The burden of unwanted junk mail sits on my lawn. Do you know who I can contact to have all mailboxes on this road placed on the homeowner’s property? I can certainly assure you that I’m not the only homeowner who is tired of picking up everyone else’s garbage.Gloria DickinsonNiskayuna Many alternatives to declawing catsThis is in reply to Lorraine VanDerWerken’s August 2 letter (“Cat-clawing bill was not well thought out”). As someone who has had multiple cats in my home (usually three or more at a time) since the late 1950s, I have never had to have a cat declawed. Since the 1970s I have kept the majority of my cats as indoor only. If you outfit your home with climbers, if possible two or more depending upon the number of cats, and scratching posts (spray catnip on them), you will usually not have a problem. If you still have a problem with scratching, there are products on the market that are nail caps for cats that are adhered to each claw. These caps are a painless, non-surgical cover for each claw. The cat’s claws are clipped short and the cap is filled with some adhesive and slid on each claw. The caps last for approximately 4 to 8 weeks, depending on how fast the claws grow. You can either apply them yourself or have your vet or vet tech do this for you. Since these products exist in the marketplace, there is no need to declaw or have anyone surrender their pets.Carol DeMeolaCobleskillStop diverting from our military needsThe U.S. Air Force recently announced that the number of its mission-capable aircraft is at an all-time low. Perhaps this fact was missed by the president, who chose to have a “flyover” on July 4th, stating that “we own the planes.” More serious is the recent Supreme Court decision to permit the president to divert billions of dollars from the Pentagon budget to build his wall. Our country has always prided itself in its commitment to defense and security. In fact, the Republican Party has always championed national defense. We have lost our way. Spending any money on a wall and diverting soldiers to build it is blatantly wrong. People must speak up now.Bruce CastkaCanajoharieEvent designed to help kids at borderLike many of your readers, I was very disturbed to learn about children being held in cages at the Texas border. It is disgusting that our political process is so broken that we have to resort to this type of behavior, which is directed against the poorest and most needy of our neighbors. It’s racist and wrong.I was also frustrated that it seemed like there was nothing that I could do to help. That all changed when we decided to organize a fundraiser. We are holding a “close the camp” event at Great Flats Brewery in Schenectady on Tuesday, Aug. 13, from 6 to 8:30 p.m. We will have several speakers who have first-hand experience with the detention camps and helping immigrants. Come join the fun and learn more about what you can do to help, and participate in a great cause.Please reserve your spot by making a donation directly to the Refugee and Immigrant Center for Education and Legal Services (RAICES), a non-profit which provides legal services for immigrant children and adults at the Texas border: www.classy.org/fundraiser/2192657. Or you can make a donation at the door.Jon LemelinNiskayunalast_img read more

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Criterion sees the light of Day

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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Turn back the tide

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Mela makeover

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Airlines face $100 billion-plus virus hit, discounts ‘wouldn’t do any good’

first_img“Hopefully, we’ll get this behind us quickly.”The Dow Jones US Airlines Index closed down 8.6%.The estimated revenue hit to the sector was made by the International Air Transport Association (IATA), which said the impact could range between $63 billion and $113 billion this year, depending on the progression of the virus.That was more than three times its forecast for a $29 billion impact made just two weeks ago. Topics : The coronavirus epidemic could rob passenger airlines of up to $113 billion in revenue this year, an industry body warned on Thursday, while the head of Southwest Airlines said a drastic drop-off in travel demand seemed fear-driven, similar to the feeling after Sept. 11, 2001.”We could discount prices tomorrow and it wouldn’t do any good,” Southwest Airlines Co Chief Executive Gary Kelly said at an aviation conference in Washington.Earlier, Kelly told CNBC: “9/11 wasn’t an economically driven issue for travel, it was more fear, quite frankly, and I think that’s what’s manifested this time. I think there’s elements of both but it has a 9/11-type feel.center_img The COVID-19 virus emerged in China late last year and has now spread to more than 80 countries, leading to travel and other restrictions. It has killed more than 3,300 people and infected tens of thousands more, raising fears of a pandemic that could plunge the global economy into recession.Airlines across the globe are rushing to cut flights and costs, and warning of a hit to earnings.”There are lots of airlines that have got relatively narrow profit margins and lots of debt, and a cash flow shock like this could certainly send some into a very difficult situation,” IATA Chief Economist Brian Pearce told a media event in Singapore.British regional carrier Flybe became the first big casualty of the outbreak after the British government walked away from a rescue package agreed upon in January due to the scale of the hit to demand over the virus.In a sign of the new difficulties for airlines, a Turkish Airlines jet was flown back to Istanbul without any passengers on board on Thursday on orders from Singapore after a passenger who had arrived on the same plane on Tuesday tested positive for the virus.South Korea, Italy and Iran have been particularly badly affected. Germany, Japan, France, Spain, the United States, Singapore and Hong Kong have all reported more than 100 cases.IATA said its lower forecast was based on the virus being contained in current markets with over 100 cases as of March 2, while the higher estimate was based on a broader epidemic. Both scenarios assume there will be a recovery by late summer.Meanwhile, Southwest warned that the epidemic could wipe up to $300 million from its first-quarter operating revenue and Norwegian Air became the latest airline to scrap its profit forecast for 2020.Norwegian, a pioneer of low-cost transatlantic travel, has been struggling for years due to cutthroat competition and heavy debts built up during rapid expansion.Its shares, which have lost nearly 60% of their value this year, ended 13% lower on Thursday.Analysts say few airlines are likely to remain unscathed, as both business and tourist travel are being affected, with meetings and events being cancelled and companies limiting travel to protect employees.Data provider ForwardKeys said on Thursday new flight bookings to Europe from elsewhere in the world fell by 79% in the last week of February, as the virus took hold in popular tourist destinations such as Italy.”The drop-off in bookings to Italy is even worse than we have observed in the past for some of the most disruptive events such as terror attacks,” ForwardKeys Vice President Insights Olivier Ponti said.last_img read more

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