Long Island Weather: 2 to 3 Inches of Snow Possible Saturday Night

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Snow plows clear the Long Island Expressway in Suffolk County on Sunday, Feb. 10, 2013.The National Weather Service is tracking a nor’easter that will develop southeast of Montauk Point and may bring a couple of inches of snowfall to the area Saturday night.The eastern half of Suffolk County may see the heaviest amount of snow, said Mike Layer, a meteorologist at the Upton-based weather service. Western Suffolk and Nassau County may see an inch or less.But meteorologists did warn that if the track shifts slightly closer to the coast that the storm could bring more significant snowfall to the region.“It’s always tricky with these systems,” Layer said, “so there’s always a slight possibility,” that the track shifts.“Emergency managers and residents need to monitor National Weather Service forecasts for updates through the day,” the weather service said in a statement.One week ago, the Island was hit with a blizzard that dumped up to 30 inches of snow on some areas, mostly in Suffolk.The storm caused thousands of Long Island Power Authority customers to lose power, left some snowed in for days and closed several major roadways.last_img read more

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Social media benchmarks for credit unions

first_img 5SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Each quarter, The Financial Brand publishes The Power 100, a list of the top 100 banks and the top 100 credit unions on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube. The rankings are based on a scoring methodology that awards points for varying levels of Facebook likes, tweets, Twitter follower, YouTube views, and YouTube subscribers.Using the underlying historical data powering the rankings, I’ve added some analysis to help credit unions benchmark their social media activity.Why focus on credit unions? Because: 1) They tend to be more retail-focused than many community banks, and 2) I could get data on credit unions’ membership size which provides a basis of comparison and analysis to evaluate the social media data.About the DataThe following analysis incorporates data for 169 credit union over nine quarters, starting in Q4 2013, ending in Q4 2015. The data is not representative of the overall credit union population. However, the 169 credit unions in the database have, in aggregate, more than 33 million members, about a third of the total US credit union membership. continue reading »last_img read more

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If unions lose Janus case, conservatives won’t like fallout

first_imgIf the Supreme Court rules against AFSCME in Janus, many unions will abandon exclusive representation altogether.Their primary motivation will be avoiding the “free rider” problem – being required to expend resources on workers who opt out of paying anything for those services.And new unions will form to compete in that abandoned space.The first unions to compete will probably be conservative.In non-bargaining Southern states that do not recognize formal union representation, organizations already exist that vie with teachers unions by offering minimal services and the promise to refrain from political activity.And right-wing foundations are paying for “organizers” to go door-to-door to convince union-represented workers to stop paying dues where they no longer have to.Would anybody really be surprised if rich and powerful funders encouraged new anti-union “unions” to more closely align members with the GOP agenda? And the big-money, right-wing plotters who have been pushing Janus are gunning for the blue states, too.“No-strike” clauses buy employers a period of guaranteed labor peace.They would be basically unenforceable if workers could quit a voluntary association to engage in a wildcat strike, or join an alternative union that eschews signed agreements to have the freedom to engage in sudden unannounced job actions.Many union organizers, frustrated by the unequal application of constitutional rights in labor relations and hungry for breakthrough strategies to revive the labor movement, will welcome this kind of chaos.Conservatives who just want to deprive unions of financial resources for short-term partisan gain should think twice about this attack – if the court rules their way, they will not like what comes next.Shaun Richman, a union organizing director, is the author of the Century Foundation report “Labor’s Bill of Rights.” More from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidation Categories: Editorial, OpinionOn Monday, the Supreme Court heard the case Janus v. AFSCME, with the fate of the labor movement seemingly in the balance.At stake are agency fees: Public-sector unions can collect fees for service from employees who don’t join the union that represents them, which the plaintiff argues is an unconstitutional act of compelled speech.The deep-pocketed backers of Janus aim to bankrupt unions and strip them of whatever power they still have.But if the court rules that an interaction a union has with the government is political speech, they might not be so happy with the results.Many have noted that such an overreaching and inconsistent decision could have unintended consequences by granting a heretofore denied constitutional right to collective bargaining and transforming thousands of workplace disputes into constitutional controversies.What the Janus backers (and most commentators) miss is that agency fees are not just compensation for the financial costs of representation, but for the political costs of representing all the members in the bargaining unit and maintaining labor peace.As AFSCME’s attorney pointed out in his oral arguments, the agency fee is routinely traded for a no-strike clause in most union contracts. Should those clauses disappear, employers will have chaos and discord on their hands.American labor laws, and the employers who benefit from them, prefer that if there’s going to be a union, only one should serve as the exclusive representative of all eligible employees in a workplace.That scheme imposes on unions a legal obligation to fairly represent all members of the bargaining unit, and a political imperative to defend the terms of any deal as “the best we could get” (even if it includes concessions on benefits and work rules).It rewards the unions with a guaranteed right to exist and a reliable base of fee-paying membership.But it rewards employers with the far more valuable guarantee of the right to direct the uninterrupted work of the enterprise while union leadership has to tamp down rank-and-file gripes and discord for the length of the contract.The combination of exclusive union representation, mandatory agency fees, no-strike clauses and “management’s rights” are the foundation of our peculiar labor relations system. Knock one part out, as the Janus plaintiffs aim to do with agency fees, and the whole system can fall apart.center_img Employers will not like the chaos that this will bring.Before this system evolved during the New Deal, multiple unions did compete in individual workplaces for dues-paying members and shop floor leadership.They would compete over who made the boldest wage and hour demands and who led the most disruptive job actions, as well as who could forge a more productive relationship with management or just flat-out take a sweetheart deal.But no deal could bring lasting labor peace, as any union cut out of the deal had a political need to disparage its terms and agitate for a fresh round of protests. To maintain production and labor peace, federal arbitrators began granting unions a “maintenance of membership” clause in contracts, which compelled union members to continue to pay dues during the terms of a collective bargaining agreement.That evolved into today’s union shop and agency fee.Public-sector labor laws, which are immediately at issue in Janus v. AFSCME, are modeled on private-sector labor law and ruled by the same bargaining dynamics. Those will eventually be followed by new unions that are more left-wing or militant (or at least crankier).They will not be satisfied with the current work rules and compensation and will have little incentive to settle.Under the current scheme, those kinds of differences of opinion are aired in winner-take-all leadership elections between competing factions.A post-Janus system of voluntary representation would encourage many opposition caucuses to break away and form alternative, minority unions for their members only.The solicitor general of Illinois – indirectly a party to the Janus case – warned in Monday’s oral arguments “that when unions are deprived of agency fees, they tend to become more militant, more confrontational.”And AFSCME’s counsel warned about the thousands of contracts that would have to be renegotiated in a climate where an agency fee is no longer a trade for a no-strike pledge, raising “an untold specter of labor unrest throughout the country.”Although Janus v. AFSCME applies to public-sector unions, this same logic applies to the majority of states that have passed “right to work” laws prohibiting mandatory union fees in the private sector.last_img read more

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Letters to the Editor for Friday, June 21

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionU.S. inflating war rationale with IranAnother day, another nation that the United States wants to wage offensive war on. Despite what several of our leaders will tell you, Iran is not a threat to the United States. Every escalation of war has actually been prompted by the United States. The United States has countless military bases surrounding all sides of Iran. And if the United States is so worried about Iran being dangerous, why did President Trump last year pull out of the Iran nuclear deal, which limited Iran’s nuclear activity and which Iran was upholding?It’s also kind of the fault of the United States that Iran is in its current situation at all.In 1953, the CIA overthrew Iran’s democratically elected government in a coup backed by the United States and installed a monarchy rule in the nation, setting it on the course to where it is now.The United States is also claiming that Iran attacked two oil tankers. There is no evidence to back this claim, and history has shown, whether it’s the Gulf of Tonkin or the Nayirah testimony or weapons of mass destruction, the U.S. government is not above planting false flags to start a war.Be it in Vietnam, Iraq, Syria, Libya or wherever, the U.S.’s regime change wars have done little to no good and have caused much harm — debt from increased military spending and countless dead American soldiers and citizens of the nations mentioned above.We must listen to the warnings from history and not allow this to happen again in Iran. Matt OillSchenectadyImmigrant license bill is to help DemsThe bill just signed by Gov. Andrew Cuomo and our state Legislature to give undocumented immigrants driver’s licenses has little to do with economics, to keep Americans safe from uninsured drivers, or because our governor wants to bring them out of the shadows. It’s for the glory of the Democratic Party.Today’s undocumented immigrant is tomorrow’s Democratic voter. So why not give them the most common form of accepted ID? Has anyone wondered why we are not being told what this license will look like? How it will differ from licenses of legal American citizens? I realized why after watching CNN this morning. It reported: “The New York attorney general has assured Gov.  Cuomo that these licenses cannot be used by ICE to track undocumented Democrats.”So I think we can assume that these licenses will look no different than those of legal residents. In the recent past, a Gazette columnist got it right when she said it’s not so much that we dislike Gov. Cuomo. We hate him. Wonder why?Cory CostanzoNiskayunaAnti-Israel letter full of inaccuraciesI am appalled at James Van Dijk’s letter of June 16. It is anti-Semitic as well as historically inaccurate. Fact-checking is needed. The desire for Israel is not a European colonial vision, rather a 2,000-year-old prayer. Jews have yearned to return to Israel for centuries; it is no “experiment.” It is mentioned in our worship and it is the concluding line of our Passover Seder, this predates European expansionism. The current state of Israel’s Jewish population is from various parts of the world; almost half come from Arab nations. The letter instills hatred rather fostering healthy resolution. Israel does not assassinate politicians or intentionally kill unarmed civilians.In defense actions following attacks, Israel has killed leaders of terrorist organizations such as Hamas. The extent of civilian casualties largely is the result of Hamas’s use of human shields, launching rockets from homes, hospitals and schools. Where is acknowledgment of Palestinian attacks on Israelis?The hateful charge that Jews are the first terrorists is anti-Semitic. Please know there were acts that preceded this, like the massacres of Jews in Hebron.I know that I speak for many when I say that I will fight for peace between Israelis and Palestinians, as well as stand up to the likes of this writer. He has every right to write letters, post them on a blog if he wants. But The Daily Gazette has a responsibility to print accurate information.Matt CutlerSchenectadyMore from The Daily Gazette:Foss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationGov. Andrew Cuomo’s press conference for Sunday, Oct. 18last_img read more

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Finland’s VER sees ultra-low ECB rates as positive for investments

first_imgThe European Central Bank’s policy of ultra-low and negative interest rates is generally positive for the investment prospects of Finland’s State Pension Fund (VER), according to the fund’s managing director, though he warned the central bank’s stance could become a major problem for some pension funds in the longer term.Timo Löyttyniemi, managing director of the €16.5bn pension fund, told IPE: “My approach is that, for a short period of time, it is OK to have low rates, as long as there are no negative shocks in the macroeconomy.“But in the longer term it could turn out to be a real challenge for pension funds’ fixed income investments.”Earlier this month, the ECB became the first major central bank to set negative interest rates. It cut its deposit rate for banks from 0% to -0.1% and its benchmark interest rate to 0.15% from 0.25%, as measures to stimulate the euro-zone economy.Half of VER’s assets are not directly invested in fixed income, Löyttyniemi said, because the fund has an equity weighting of 40%, while alternatives make up another 10%.So far this year, however, even though the ECB policy has weighed on interest rates for fixed income, VER’s fixed income portfolio has produced a return of 3-4% in the first five months of the year, which Loyttyniemi described as splendid.“This will become challenging for the future returns, especially on government bond and credit bond rates,” he said.Löyttyniemi said he very much understood the ECB’s efforts to get money moving from the banking system to the real economy.“That is why they have to take these various measures, and they have room to do that as long as inflation remains at a low level,” he said.However, he pointed to the sudden increase in 10-year US government bond yields seen in May 2013, which had strong side-effects for emerging markets, as an example of how a situation can change unexpectedly.“That’s a warning for the future, that the change could come quite quickly,” he said, but he added that, for the time being, the pressure was limited as long as inflation rates remained low.While he said a steady, low-yield environment would not be problem for pension funds that had enough equities in their portfolios – assuming there were no macroeconomic global shocks – Löyttyniemi warned that if it continued for too long there was a risk to the value of assets.“It is always the case that when a trend continues for too long – especially when it is affected by policy issues – it might become destabilising,” he said.However, right now, what is lacking in European and other economies is the momentum of growth, and precisely this aspect is being targeted by the ECB, he said.However, if time suggested the policy was proving ineffective, there would then be an expectation of additional measures, as sufficient growth is the ultimate goal, he said.last_img read more

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NZMA – End of Life Choice Act Referendum What New Zealanders need to think about

first_imgNZMA September 2020Family First Comment: An important document from the medical profession that you should read before voting in the euthanasia referendum.Key points:Who will be able to end their life under the End of Life Choice Act?What are some of the problems with the eligibility criteria?Are there safeguards for vulnerable people in the Act?If the Act comes into force, will misuse be detected?What has happened in Canada after it enacted laws to enable euthanasia?At the 2020 General Election on 17 October, New Zealanders will be asked whether they support the End of Life Choice Act 2019 coming into force. It is important that voters are well informed before making their choice. If a majority support the End of Life Choice Act coming into force, euthanasia and doctor-assisted suicide will become legal in New Zealand. This would have profound impacts on the doctor-patient relationship, risks for vulnerable people, and could result in wrongful deaths. We are concerned that there is limited awareness of some of the issues relating to this Act, ambiguity in some of the wording in the Act, and confusion about euthanasia and doctor-assisted suicide, generally. We also believe there are important lessons to be learned from other jurisdictions where euthanasia has been legalised, such as Canada.Who is NZMA? NZMA is New Zealand’s largest medical organisation, with over 5,000 members from all areas of medicine. What is our position on the End of Life Choice Act? We do not support the End of Life Choice Act 2019 coming into force. This reflects our opposition to euthanasia and doctor-assisted suicide on the grounds they are unethical, but also our belief that the Act has serious shortcomings that put vulnerable people at risk of wrongful death. In addition, experience from Canada shows that what starts out as narrow eligibility criteria for accessing euthanasia and doctor-assisted suicide can widen over time. While we acknowledge that there is a range of opinions within the medical community, our position represents the views of a strong majority of our membership.Key points:Who will be able to end their life under the End of Life Choice Act?What are some of the problems with the eligibility criteria?Are there safeguards for vulnerable people in the Act?If the Act comes into force, will misuse be detected?What has happened in Canada after it enacted laws to enable euthanasia?READ MORE: https://www.nzma.org.nz/documents/end-of-life-choice-act-referendum-fact-sheethttps://www.nzma.org.nz/documents/end-of-life-choice-act-referendum-fact-sheetlast_img read more

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Nelson Agholor makes the most of his opportunities

first_imgSomehow, like a hot knife  through butter, senior quarterback Matt Barkley’s pass sliced  two Oregon defensive backs and landed in the hands of Nelson Agholor.Five star · Despite playing alongside superstars Marqise Lee and Robert Woods, Nelson Agholor has 14 receptions for 269 yards this season. – Sean Roth | Daily TrojanThe freshman wide receiver held on as Ducks cornerback Avery Patterson screamed in for a pummeling hit.“I was standing on the sideline,” wide receivers coach Tee Martin said, “thinking he was going to get his helmet knocked off.”His helmet stayed on — Agholor slipped the incoming Patterson and in a flash sprinted into the end zone to cap a 76-yard touchdown haul, the first scoring play of his short nine-game college career.“He made a great catch, great concentration, caught it and kept running with it,” Martin added.The highlight reel play served as the exclamation point on Agholor’s breakout performance versus Oregon last Saturday, a game where he finished with six receptions for 162 yards and one touchdown.“It felt good to just help my teammates out,” Agholor said. “There’s an opportunity given to me every week, and whether the ball comes to me or not, I just have to make plays.”His first big play came in mid-September at Stanford on a 49-yard reception. This time, though, he punched it in for six points.And should he continue making plays, USC’s opponents will have a third dynamic wideout to worry about in the Tampa, Fla. native.On the season, Agholor has caught 14 passes for 269 yards, including his touchdown Saturday.And his latest performance suggests some sort of a late-season rise similar to that of his predecessors, sophomore Marqise Lee and junior Robert Woods, who notched impressive freshman campaigns of their own — each was named the conference’s offensive freshman of the year.“He’s starting to catch on, right around the same time as Marqise and Robert did,” Barkley said. “It’s taken him a couple games to get into that rhythm and to get that confidence. He’s known what to do for a while now, but he finally got a chance on some of those deeper balls.”Agholor, though, hasn’t been thinking about those deep balls, not that much anyway. Oddly enough, he’s been thinking about a botched onside kick during the waning minutes against Oregon — when he had a chance to recover the ball but took the wrong angle of pursuit.“That’s discipline, that’s something I can control,” Agholor said. “We’ve actually coached that up many times, and I let emotions take me away from my fundamentals. I tried to chase the ball, rather than hug the sidelines.”Discipline and fundamentals, combined with talent, is what has allowed Agholor, a five-star recruit coming from Berkeley Prep, to make an impact through nine games with the No. 19 Trojans thus far.In the words of Martin, his position coach, it’s because of the “formula.”“When you’re talented, you work hard, and you’re prepared on Saturday, you’re going to produce,” Martin said. “That’s the formula. He has those three attributes. … He cares about knowing what to do and he wants to be great.”So his latest effort wasn’t all that surprising. It was expected.Asked if Aghlor’s touchdown reception was a pass most freshmen could make, Martin just smiled.“I’m glad that one made it.”last_img read more

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Kessler, Heidari named Pac-12 Players of the Week

first_imgFollow us on Twitter @dailytrojan Redshirt sophomore quarterback Cody Kessler and junior kicker Andre Heidari were named the Pac-12’s Offensive and Special Teams Players of the Week, respectively, on Monday following their impressive performances in USC’s 20-17 upset victory over Stanford.Heidari connected on a 47-yard field goal with 19 seconds remaining to clinch USC’s win. Prior to Saturday’s game, the Bakersfield, Calif. native had come under scrutiny after missing several field goals in USC losses this season, but Heidari was able to redeem himself against Stanford.Interim head coach Ed Orgeron surprisingly decided to play for the field goal late in the game and showed an unexpected amount of trust for his struggling kicker by sending him onto the field in the biggest game of the year for the Trojans.Heidari also made a short field goal that gave the Trojans a 10-point lead in the second quarter.Kessler was 25-for-37 for 288 yards and a touchdown on Saturday. He controlled the offense from start to finish, and was able to keep his composure in the face of the mounting Stanford pressure from their vaunted front seven.On the season, Kessler has now thrown for 2,265 yards with 13 touchdown passes and just six interceptions. His completion percentage of 64.7 percent is the fourth-best in the Pac-12.Redshirt junior safety Dion Bailey was also nominated for defensive player of the week. Bailey had a critical interception in the fourth quarter after Stanford had advanced the ball to the USC 10-yard line. Bailey picked off Stanford quarterback Kevin Hogan’s pass and returned it to the USC 34-yard line. It was Bailey’s fourth interception of the season, tying him for the team lead with freshman safety Su’a Cravens.The Trojans continue play this weekend against the Colorado Buffaloes, and are still in contention for the Pac-12 South title.last_img read more

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Kenny Lassiter grows into offensive weapon for Syracuse

first_img Published on September 21, 2015 at 8:37 pm Contact Chris: cjlibona@syr.edu | @ChrisLibonati Kenny Lassiter’s position switch was only supposed to last for a couple tournaments. At least that’s what his then-club coach told him. “I just tried it out because my coach really wanted me to be a defender,” Lassiter said. “So I was like, OK, I’ll just try it even though I didn’t like it, and I played decently.”Syracuse’s coaching staff saw him in his defensive cameo and recruited him to play defense at SU. The problem was that it was only time he played as a defender in his career. After being listed as a defender and redshirting in his first season at SU, Lassiter switched positions in the spring of his freshman year and now has found a role in the Orange’s offense. His 6-foot-2, 180-pound frame ties him as the third-tallest and eighth-heaviest player, size SU’s forwards have rarely had in past seasons. But Lassiter has just one goal on five shots and has started only one game. His frame holds potential, SU head coach Ian McIntyre said, but it’s just tough to see until he gets moving. AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“He’s a potential enigma for this team,” McIntyre said. “When he turns it on, he can be unplayable; he’s got that physical strength, that power and he’s adding more of a consistency this year.”Lassiter is the only 6-foot-plus forward the Orange has had in the last two years. McIntyre joked that Lassiter looks even bigger standing next to forward Chris Nanco, almost like two of him. Size is a quality mostly found in SU’s back line this season and in past years with players like Skylar Thomas, Oskar Sewerin and Alex Bono. Nanco, a fellow forward and also Lassiter’s roommate, said Emil Ekblom was the team’s biggest forward that would hold the ball for SU last season. Ekblom stood just 5 feet 11 inches and weighed 170 pounds. “He’s a presence to hold up the ball for us up top so other smaller forwards can run off of him,” Nanco said.Although Lassiter hasn’t started much this season, that’s just one of the potential roles he could fill. Losing three of its top five scoring options has put SU in a bind offensively this season. The Orange has scored multiple goals just twice in six games this season. Four of its goals came in one game against UC Riverside. Lassiter’s size makes him a potential target when SU is on the run and puts another option in the box on set pieces, one place the Orange lost some of its key options, like Thomas, after last season. “If I can give him a little shove, get him off balance,” Lassiter said of how his size and speed help on set pieces, “or just like move around and just get him out of the way so I can hopefully score a goal.”But his potential and ability have only matched up and shown on the scoreboard once this season. Lassiter pushed a backheel from Nanco forward and to his left before ripping a shot to the low, right side of the net from just a few yards out. Although Bucknell goalie Mike Lansing dove and got part his hand on the ball, the ball bounced and its backspin carried it into the net. The forward has already played in more games this season than in the rest of his career and scored a goal, but his potential is still largely waiting to be fulfilled. “He’s just awkward, he’s bumbling, he looks like Bambi on ice sometimes,” McIntyre said. “… It’s when that body gets in motion he’s a real handful.” Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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Betfred & GVC forgo platform partnership

first_img Submit Betfred extends World Snooker Championship deal until 2022 August 17, 2020 Betfred counters Oppenheimer bid in race to rescue Phumelela August 26, 2020 StumbleUpon Related Articles Share Share GVC hires ‘comms pro’ Tessa Curtis to re-energise media profile  August 25, 2020 Industry news sources have reported that Betfred and GVC Holdings (GVC) have terminated their planned platform partnership, just months before Betfred was due to begin its platform migration to GVC systems.EGR Magazine reports that the both Betfred and GVC governance have agreed by ‘mutual consent’ to terminate the partnership, first agreed in May 2016.Entering the partnership, Betfred had agreed for GVC to provide its online sports betting and igaming platform on a 10-year exclusive basis replacing its current provider GTECH (IGT Group).It has been reported that Betfred and GVC will end the partnership ‘amicably’ with the companies not seeking to trigger any penalty clauses.Both operators confirmed the decision to terminate the partnership via a joint statement, however the operators would not detail further specifics regarding the cancellation of provisions.Having won a competitive tender, the Betfred platform partnership was labelled as a ‘transformational B2B agreement’ by GVC governance last year, as the newly FTSE-listed enterprise moved to create new business channels.At present, it remains unknown whether Betfred governance will seek a new online platform provider.last_img read more

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