JQC records bill fails, new judges still in the works

first_img April 15, 2002 Regular News JQC records bill fails, new judges still in the works JQC records bill fails, new judges still in the workscenter_img The 2002 Regular Session of the Florida Legislature ended without any new judges being approved, but there’s a good chance that will change in the expected upcoming special budget session.And a proposed constitutional amendment to open records of the Judicial Qualifications Commission likewise died in the closing days after passing the House but failing to be considered in the Senate.Several other bills affecting the profession and the court system had varying fates in the always-hectic final days of the session.The last version of the certification legislation, HB 1927, cleared the Senate by a 39-0 vote on March 21. It called for one new circuit judgeship in each of the Fifth, Sixth, Seventh, Eighth, Ninth, 10th, 11th, 13th, 15th, 17th, 18th, and 20th circuits. It also called for the new judges to be elected this fall.The House version, which had passed a few days earlier, omitted the new judges in the Eighth, 13th, and 18th circuits and had the governor appoint the new judges to take office on March 1, 2003. It had passed the House 113-0 on March 19. The lower chamber never took up the revamped Senate version when it returned.The Senate’s original certification bill called for 10 new circuit judges, while the House’s initial version called for two new district court of appeal judges. Both were far less than Supreme Court Chief Justice Charles Wells requested in the annual certification opinion: 34 new circuit judges, 13 new county judges, and two DCA judges.Sen. Locke Burt, R-Ormond Beach, chair of the Senate Judiciary Committee, said the sticking issue was whether the new judges would be elected or appointed, with the Senate favoring election and the lower chamber wanting Gov. Jeb Bush to fill the new posts.“We had agreed on a number of judges, we had decided that they all be circuit judges, and we had decided they would start January 7, and the money is in the budget,” Burt said. “What we hadn’t resolved was elected versus appointed.”Since the money is in the budget, he expects that matter to be resolved in the special budget session — anticipated to be called in early May — although he added there is the possibility of a deadlock that results in no new judges.If that happens, it would be the second time in the past three sessions that no new judges have been approved, although in the 2000 session, it was due to a legislative oversight. Last year, lawmakers approved 26 of the 44 new judgeships requested by the court.Chief Justice Wells expressed optimism: “We are hopeful that the funding of at least some new judgeships will be part of the budget adopted in the special session which adopts next year’s budget,” he said.The proposed constitutional amendment to make all JQC proceedings and records open upon a finding of no probable cause passed the House on March 19 by a 79-33 vote. But the Senate sent the measure to its Judiciary Committee and allowed it to die there. An identical Senate resolution had already cleared the Judiciary Committee, but died in the Rules and Calendar Committee.The JQC had strongly opposed the measure — which was initially proposed by House Judicial Oversight Chair Larry Crow — arguing it would remove anonymity from those who file complaints and therefore hurt the process.Crow contended the process needs to be opened up, especially in light of the recent judicial impeachment proceedings in the House, and pointed out that “the public is thirsting for opening up these records.”But Burt said there was little enthusiasm for the measure in the upper chamber. “It got started in the system late and it had a number of committee references,” he said. “And it got caught in the system.”Even if it had made it to the Senate floor, Burt said there was considerable skepticism among senators, and it might have failed to get the 60 percent needed to pass a constitutional amendment.Sen. Skip Campbell, D-Tamarac, said that senators were also interested in sticking to an informal deal that last year gave the House a bill allowing the governor to appoint all the members to the judicial nominating commissions in exchange for no major changes to the court system this year.“A couple of senators felt very strongly it would stifle reporting of bad judges and went to leadership and asked them not to allow it to come up,” he said. What Passed: • The legislature passed and sent to the governor SB 1946, which sets out that a plaintiff must show a defendant failed to exercise reasonable care in maintaining a business premises in a slip-and-fall case. Lawmakers argued that the Supreme Court, in Owens v. Publix Supermarket, Inc. , 802 So. 2d 315 (Fla. 2001), had shifted too much of the burden of proof to defendants in such cases. The bill, supported by most retailers as well as the Academy of Florida Trial Lawyers, passed the Senate 35-0 and the House 118-0.• The legislature passed, unanimously in both chambers, HB 585, the Florida Uniform Principal and Income Act. It regulates several items relating to trusts, including judicial oversight and a trustee’s power to adjust between principal and income. The Real Property, Probate and Trust Law Section supported the bill.• The legislature passed, unanimously in both chambers, SB 720 to fix glitches in trust and probate laws, including setting time limits for creditors to file claims and setting notice requirements for certain trusts. The bill was supported by RPPTL and the Florida Bankers Association.• Effective July 1, F.S. §57.105 governing sanctions on parties filing frivolous claims in civil suits will conform to Rule 11 of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, thanks to SB 528 and HB 487. In short, the federal rule gives opposing parties 21 days to withdraw or correct a frivolous claim before a motion for sanctions can be filed with the court.• Both chambers passed unanimously a bill to require a court conducting arraignment, sentencing, or a case management hearing to advise a crime victim of certain statutory and constitutional rights. HB 1209 by Reps. Andy Gardiner, R-Orlando, and Mitch Needelman, R-Melbourne, and SB 1974 by Sen. Victor Crist, R-Tampa, will take effect July 1. A similar bill, SB 2066, would have required clerks of court to provide information to crime victims about enforcing a civil judgment or lien against the defendant. That bill died in the Judiciary Committee.• SB 434 and HB 1391 passed unanimously through both chambers. The engrossed bill would require the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles to deliver jury lists to the clerks of circuit court on a quarterly basis. Current law requires the DHSMV to provide those lists only once per year. The new law becomes effective October 1.• SB 288 by Sen. Campbell intended to cut down on the delays of placing children in the state’s care up for adoption or back with their families passed the Senate 34-0 on March 14 and cleared the House 116-0 on March 22.• HB 787 (identical to SB 944), supported by the Business Law Section as a way to fix glitches in the limited liability corporation laws, passed unanimously in both the House and the Senate.• SB 1568 by Sen. Burt passed both the House and Senate unanimously. When the bill becomes effective July 1, all attorneys listed on the statewide registry of attorneys in private practice who are available to represent people in postconviction capital collateral proceedings must complete at least 10 hours of continuing legal education per year devoted specifically to the defense of capital cases.• passing HB 1679, the legislature imposed a moratorium on clerks of court placing certain public judicial records on the Internet and agreed to create the Study Committee on Public Records. Groups such as the Judicial Management Council and the Supreme Court Workgroup on Public Records have been tasked with investigating different aspects of public court records — looking at everything from electronic access to what constitutes a court record — and now the legislature has authorized and funded a statewide, multi-disciplinary group. The bill amends F.S. §28.2221, passed during the 2000 session, which required every clerk of court to provide for electronic retrieval of court documents by January 1, 2006. • SB 1978, revamping F.S. §105.031 to require an earlier qualifying period for candidates for judicial office, died in committee, but the bill language was engrossed in SB 618, which subsequently passed both chambers. The earlier qualifying period in the new bill mimics the qualifying period for federal candidates. What Didn’t Pass: • HB 595 and SB 732, both of which would have required courts to impose an additional $35 court fee on people pleading no contest or guilty to charges of domestic violence, died in the Committee on Fiscal Policy and Resources and the Appropriations Subcommittee on Public Safety and the Judiciary, respectively. The money collected would have been used to help fund legal services for domestic violence victims.• The House passed, but the Senate failed to take up, HB 307, which would have helped assistant state attorneys and public defenders repay law school loans to help attract new attorneys to those public service jobs. The measure passed in the House 113-0 on March 19 and was sent to the Senate, which referred it to the Judiciary Committee and never took it up. A similar Senate bill, SB 1138, passed the Senate Judiciary and Governmental Oversight and Productivity committees, but died in an appropriations subcommittee.•A proposal to increase the number of people who can act as “retired judges” died on calendar in both chambers. HB 17, sponsored by Rep. Sally Heyman, D-North Miami Beach, and SB 424 by Sen. Daryl Jones, D-Miami, would have allowed judges or justices defeated in a popular or merit retention election to serve as retired judges, provided they had served at least 10 years on the bench and met other provisions established by the Supreme Court.• Rep. Ken Sorensen’s, R-Tavernier, plan to require each district court of appeal to be made up of at least one judge from each represented judicial circuit, HB 205, died on calendar. The Senate version, SB 1800, sponsored by Sen. Alex Diaz de la Portilla, R-Miami, stalled out between the chambers.• Some of the most sweeping changes proposed this year were found in joint resolutions by Sen. Anna Cowin, R-Leesburg, (SJR 1528) and Rep. Bruce Kyle, R-Ft. Myers, (HJR 1), which would have revamped Article V of the Constitution regarding the judiciary. Among the changes proposed were limitations on habeas corpus and specifying that courts could only act when there was an actual dispute, which critics said would eliminate declaratory judgments. The amendments would also have allowed the legislature to designate any of the five district courts of appeal as the final arbiter in a specific area of law, such as death penalty cases or administrative law appeals. Kyle’s bill was sent to the Judicial Oversight Committee, but never heard. Cowin’s bill was heard in the Judiciary Committee, but bogged down there and was eventually amended completely to become the Senate version of the bill to open up JQC records.• At one point during the session, SJR 1666, sponsored by Sens. Ron Silver, D-North Miami, and Tom Rossin, D-Royal Palm Beach, would have imposed an eight-year term limit on Florida Supreme Court justices. But, after combining the bill with SB 1118, the judicial provision was removed. The final bill would have raised the limit from eight to 12 years on Florida representatives, senators, and Cabinet members, but died in messages.• Rep. David Simmons, R-Altamonte Springs, introduced HB 503, and Sen. Campbell introduced its counterpart, SB 1266, which would have changed the jurisdiction of Florida’s trial courts. The bills would have shifted certain felonies, including certain traffic and bad check offenses, to county court. HB 503 died in the Committee on Criminal Justice Appropriations, and SB 1266 in the Judiciary Committee.• Both House and Senate legislation to spread the Unified Family Court model across the state died in committees — the Council for Smarter Government and Fiscal Responsibility Council, respectively. HB 1455, sponsored by Reps. Ken Gottlieb, D-Miramar, and Cindy Lerner, D-Miami, and SB 1226 would have created the Family Code and provided for the reorganization of certain courts to mimic the Unified Family Court. The pilot program recommended in the Supreme Court’s Model Family Court plan has already been implemented in the Sixth Circuit.• Rep. Fred Brummer’s, R-Apopka, plan to make Judicial Nominating Commission proceedings public, HJR 1465, died in the Committee on Judicial Oversight. The bill did not have a Senate companion.• Another bill by Brummer, HJR 1337, would have replaced the Bar and the Supreme Court with the Department of Business and Professional Regulation as the entity responsible for regulating lawyers. The bill died in the Committee on Business Regulation.• Two bills hotly contested by environmental groups — HB 257 and SB 280 — will not make it to the governor’s desk. The House version passed through the full House with a 94-24 vote, but the bill died when it was referred to several Senate committees in the last days of the session. The Senate companion bill died in the Appropriations Subcommittee on General Government and never reached the full chamber. The bills would have revised the requirements for pleadings, motions, and other papers filed under the Administrative Procedures Act — a provision which environmental groups said would limit public access to the system.• HB 1191 by Rep. Gary Siplin, D-Orlando, would have repealed F.S. §923.03 regarding indictments. The bill died in the Committee on Crime Prevention, Corrections & Safety.• SB 300, which eliminated statute of limitations for sex crimes where DNA evidence is available, passed the Senate on March 6, but died in the House. A similar bill, HB 1597, passed the House on second reading but died on the calendar without being taken up for third reading and final passage. A similar bill by Rep. Holly Benson. R-Pensacola, (HB 655) would have removed the time limitations for any case in which the perpetrator is identified by DNA evidence collected at the crime scene. That bill died in Judicial Oversight.• Two bills (HB 1615 and SB 1212) attempted to set age boundaries on who could be sentenced to death, but neither bill passed both chambers. Both bills provided that only criminals who were 18 years old or older at the time they committed the crime could be sentenced to death. The Senate version passed its chamber unanimously, then was referred to a House committee where it later died. The House version died in Criminal Justice Appropriations.• SB 2160 would have amended the Florida Evidence Code to provide for disclosure of certain information that is otherwise inadmissible and eliminated the need to renew certain objections to preserve appellate rights, but died in the Judiciary Committee.• Four connected bills (two bills and two linked trust fund allotments) would have created and funded provisions for certain nonviolent drug offenders to be referred to drug treatment or drug-offender probation. The House bills were removed prior to consideration, and the Senate bills died in committee.• An attempt by Sen. Anna Cowin to correct the judicial funding shortfall for this fiscal year was thwarted when SB 2080 died between chambers. The bill would have increased the amount of certain civil penalties to be paid into the County Article V Trust Fund and decreased the amount paid into the General Revenue Fund. It passed the Senate unanimously but never reached the House floor. To check the latest status of a bill, visit Online Sunshine, the Florida Legislature’s Web site, at http://www.leg.state.fl.us/Welcome/index.cfm . Under “Session,” click on “Bills and Related Documents,” then use the pull down menus to find a complete list of regular session bills.last_img read more

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Anti-Common Core Fury Intensifies on Long Island; Protest Draws More Than 1K

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Critics of the controversial education reform Common Core rallied at Long Island University Post Campus Monday in the first such organized protest on Long Island this year against the Obama administration initiative and the latest in what has been a consistent and relentless campaign among opponents to halt the contentious standardized testing examinations.Titled “Standing Together to Save Public Education: A Call to Action,” the gathering drew more than 1,000 parents, teachers, school administrators and anti-Common Core activists, including New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s former gubernatorial primary challenger Zephyr Teachout, and was keynoted by renowned education policy analyst, historian and New York University professor Diane Ravitch.Joining her onstage was a panel of distinguished educators including: South Side High School in Rockville Centre Principal Carol Burris, Comsewogue School District science teacher and Port Jefferson Station Teachers Association President Beth Dimino, Comsewogue Superintendent Dr. Joe Rella, New York State Allies for Public Education (NYSAPE) cofounder and Long Island Opt-Out Facebook administrator Jeanette Deutermann, and education advocacy group Lace to the Top cofounder Kevin Glynn, a teacher at Brookhaven Elementary School in South Country School District. Each spoke about how the Common Core tests are damaging to children and echoed the need for attendees to “Refuse The Tests.” With more than 30,000 students across Long Island “opting out” and forgoing taking the exams last year—and with that number expected to increase significantly during the next scheduled round of exams this April—panelists found a welcoming and charged audience quick to respond with resounding applause and cheers. [Read About How Thousands Of Long Island Students Opted-Out Of Common Core Here] “We are in the midst of a vast social experiment on the children of the nation and it is all tied to the standardized test,” Ravitch told the electrified crowd, many of whom held homemade posters and signs decrying the Common Core program. Speakers also took turns addressing—oftentimes blasting—statements made by Gov. Cuomo in a recent edition of Newsday’s opinion section, in which he accused standardized test opponents of distracting citizens of the positive aspects of his education reform with “noise” and “cloud[ing]” up data within “the fog of protest.” Ravitch argued against Common Core’s test-based teacher evaluations, encouraging parents to refuse to let their children take the state standardized tests that the controversial reform depends upon, and defending her position with factual statistics and figures. “Long Island has a four-year graduation rate of 89 percent,” she stressed. “That graduation rate is far higher than New York State’s. Without Long Island, New York would have a graduation rate of 73 percent. Long Island has higher graduation rates for low-income students, for students with disabilities, and for students of color than the rest of New York State.“Unfortunately, Governor Cuomo thinks that you’re hiding a lot of failing teachers,” continued Ravitch. “He created the current evaluation system and now he’s very angry that only one percent of teachers statewide were found to be ineffective. And since Long Island has been the epicenter of resistance to his flawed evaluation policy, he has ordered an investigation of Long Island’s teacher evaluation ratings. “You must be doing something terribly wrong to have these high graduation rates,” she sarcastically added.In his Newsday op-ed, Gov. Cuomo stated “In New York last year, about 99 percent of the teachers were rated effective, while only 38 percent of high school graduates are ready for college and careers.”“How can that be?” he wondered.Ravitch contended to the crowd that the cut scores [the grades set by the testing consortia to signify passing grades] were devised in such a way as to fail a set percentage of students and present an “invented crisis” in the education system. Based on her seven-year tenure on the governing board of the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), Ravitch described that the cut scores were based on proficiency levels set by NAEP, a threshold that a known minority of students were expected to reach. “They knew well in advance that only 30 to 35 percent of students in most states have ever scored proficient by these standards,” she slammed. “The Common Core tests are designed to fail the majority of students and that is exactly what happened in New York State. But you have to understand that the cut scores are not based on science. They are not based on objective measures, but subjective judgment.”United We Stand: Anti-Common Core activists (L-R) Carol Burris, Joe Rella, Jeanette Deutermann, Beth Dimino and Kevin Glynn were among the panelists criticizing the controversial education reform initiative during a protest rally at Long Island University Post Campus in Brookville Monday, March 9, 2015. (Jaime Franchi/Long Island Press)Ravitch accused Cuomo of “holding children hostage” by threatening to withhold educational funding unless schools comply with teacher evaluation plans based largely on state standardized testing for English Language Arts (ELA) standards and math for students in grades three through eight. She also explained the flaws in basing teacher evaluations on standardized test scores, outlining the arbitrary nature of the basis of cut scores, wide spectrum of outside influencers on student test scores, and illustrating how emphasis on testing has ramifications on almost every aspect of children’s education. Among these, Ravitch argued that this narrows the curriculum only to what is being tested, cuts back on or eliminates the arts, and slashes time allotted for recess and physical education. Other subjects have likewise suffered as more time and money has gone to testing and test preparation, she said.“When we place so much emphasis on the right answer, we penalize children who think differently,” challenged Ravitch. “We crush individuality and creativity. Test-driven culture rewards conformity and not creativity. We became the greatest, most creative, most dynamic economy and culture in the world because of our diversity.” Teachout, a Fordham University law professor and vocal anti-Common Core critic during her gubernatorial candidacy, was called onstage to a rousing standing ovation. Although she did not have any prepared remarks, she gave an impromptu speech, blasting the tests as “grotesque” and “inhumane,” and stating that “Public education is the infrastructure of democracy.” A threat to public education then, is a threat to the very fabric of the nation, she explained. Burris, the South Side High School principal, who authored a 2002 book championing the potential of the Common Core State Standards titled Opening The Common Core, has since abandoned her optimism of the national education reform. “If you would have asked me two years ago if I would have said to you consider opting out, I would have said no,” she admitted to the audience. “But I’m not in that place any more. I’ve come to realize that the tests are the rock of which the erosion of local control and the undermining of our schools are built. They use test scores as weapons to demean our profession and our schools.”Dr. Rella, superintendent of the Comsewogue School District, has been an equally vocal critic of Common Core. Most recently, he publicly supported Beth Dimino, an eighth-grade science teacher in his district who very vocally shared her decision to become a conscientious objector of the standardized tests by refusing to administer them to students. [Read About The #dominoeffect Here]“Parents,” he pleaded, “exercise your right to decide what is best for your children! Don’t be intimidated or bullied. Although at times we may feel oppressed, depressed, demoralized, put down upon, this is not about us. This is about the children in our care. The barbarians are not only at the gates, they are inside the walls and we—all of us—are the only thing preventing an entire generation of students from being sacrificed to corporate greed.”Lastly, parent and education advocate Jeanette Deutermann, of North Bellmore, delivered an impassioned request that parents act as “Upstanders”—a term coined by administrators of the Holocaust Memorial & Tolerance Center of Nassau County to describe those unwilling to remain silent in the face of intolerance, in all its forms—by prohibiting their children to participate in the standardized tests next month. Upstanders, she said, “refuse because they understand that what is happening to our children and our classrooms is not okay.” Deutermann then rattled off a list of the ways she believes the education reform is harmful, including: “giv[ing] a test to special education students one, two, and three grade levels above the grade they are learning at, knowing 95 percent of them will fail, blam[ing] a teacher for an underfunded, overcrowded school environment, punish[ing] a teacher for taking a job in a school that has a significant population of struggling students because he or she wants to make a difference.”Ending well after 10 p.m., attendees rushed the stage to take selfies with presenters and further discuss the ways in which they, too, had been affected by Common Core. Voices wafted loudly into the air, and though late, the energy in the room far from dissipated, the “noise” Cuomo so criticized in his op-ed ever-rising to a fevered pitch vowing to inundate classrooms with organized, universal defiance.last_img read more

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The fate of LUMA hangs in the balance

first_imgA number of sponsors who had initially made commitments to LUMA 2020 are no longer able to fulfill them due to COVID-19, Bernard said, with the most significant funder telling them just yesterday. (WBNG) — The organizers of LUMA 2020 delivered sad news to the community earlier today. Stay with 12 News on air and online as we continue to follow this developing story. Bernard telling disappointed fans that the team has been working for months on a series of exciting features that would replace the normal version of LUMA this year but now, he says it appears likely they won’t be able to move forward. Bernard went on to say that because of commitments they already made and how much progress they’ve been able to make in their current projects, the financial realities may end LUMA for the foreseeable future.center_img Even with the bad news, LUMA organizers are still looking for solutions to bring the event back in the future. Bernard call LUMA’s past five years “spectacular” and that they “had even more spectacular things in the pipeline. But reality doesn’t always cooperate with the dream.” In a Facebook post, organizer Joshua Bernard saying they hoped to be announcing the first digital-version of LUMA 2020 by now but instead the troubles are worse than that.last_img read more

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Moody’s lauds Indonesia’s economic response but virus containment efforts lag

first_imgIndonesia’s response to contain the COVID-19 outbreak has been slower compared with some other countries in the region despite policies to limit the economic and financial shock being introduced in a relatively coordinated manner, a credit rating agency has said.”Indonesia’s response to contain the coronavirus outbreak has lagged some other countries in the region. But its policies to limit the related economic and financial shock have been introduced in a relatively coordinated manner,” Moody’s Investor Service wrote in a research note published on Friday.An unprecedented increase in the deficit ceiling by the government would allow for more fiscal headroom, although the effectiveness with which additional budgetary space was used would determine the extent of support for domestic demand, according to Moody’s. “We expect that such measures will at best buffer the impact of the [economic] shock rather than reverse or resolve it,” the research note reads.President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo signed on Tuesday a government regulation in lieu of law (Perppu) that, among other things, allows the government to widen the state budget deficit to beyond the 3 percent of GDP legal limit as it plans to add Rp 405.1 trillion (US$24.3 billion) to its spending this year to provide more funds for the healthcare system, social welfare safety nets and business-recovery programs.Read also: Indonesia’s COVID-19 stimulus playbook explainedThe government expects the country’s economy to grow by 2.3 percent this year under the baseline scenario, which would be the lowest level since 1999, or contract by 0.4 percent in the worst-case scenario as the pandemic hits business activity. Moody’s forecasts Indonesia’s GDP growth to slow to 3 percent, the lowest rate since the 1998 Asian financial crisis, before recovering to 4.3 percent in 2021.“Although growth in the first quarter will only slow modestly, partial shutdowns across Jakarta and other parts of Java – the epicenter of Indonesia’s economic activity – indicate that the deceleration will be relatively rapid,” Moody’s vice president Anushka Shah said.“Meanwhile, the 20 percent drop in the rupiah against the dollar since early February and the spike in bond yields will have economy-wide effects, particularly if prolonged,” Shah added.The government’s and Bank Indonesia’s (BI) various economic scenarios also include the rupiah exchange rate weakening to between Rp 17,500 and Rp 20,000 per US dollar, which will surpass the Rp 16,950 level recorded during the 1998 crisis.The local currency, already the worst performer in Asia, traded at Rp 16,430 per US dollar as of 4.42 p.m. in Jakarta, according to Bloomberg data. It has depreciated more than 18 percent since the beginning of the year. The 10-year government bond yield, meanwhile, stood at 8.37 percent on Friday, an increase of more than 100 basis points (bps) since the start of the year.Sizeable nonresident investment in Indonesia exposes the country to swings in capital inflows, which are then amplified during episodes of global financial market stress, Moody’s says.“This has economy-wide effects, particularly for the fiscal and external accounts, but also for local businesses. Weaker corporate credit profiles due to higher debt servicing and roll-over costs hurt bank asset quality.”Indonesia’s capital outflows have reached a total of Rp 145.1 trillion (US$8.78 billion) in the bond and stock markets since the beginning of the year, BI data show.Jokowi has declared a public health emergency that imposes large-scale social restrictions in an effort to contain the highly contagious COVID-19 disease. As of Friday afternoon, more than 1,900 people in the country were infected with 180 deaths, according to official data.Topics :last_img read more

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Unai Emery responds to having worse record than Arsene Wenger after Arsenal’s defeat to Leicester City

first_img Comment Metro Sport ReporterSaturday 9 Nov 2019 8:22 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link20Shares Advertisement Unai Emery admits Arsenal need ‘time and patience’ after the Leicester defeat (Sky Sports)Unai Emery has called for patience from Arsenal fans following the 2-0 defeat to Leicester City on Saturday.Second-half goals from Jamie Vardy and James Maddison sealed the victory for Brendan Rodgers’ side, leaving the Gunners eight points behind fourth place and with just one win in their last six Premier League games.The fixture was also Emery’s 50th in the Premier League but the Spaniard has registered a worse points tally than Arsene Wenger’s final 50 games in charge of the Gunners.Under Emery, Arsenal have recorded 97 points in the Premier League but Wenger managed one point more in his last 50 matches.ADVERTISEMENT Unai Emery responds to having worse record than Arsene Wenger after Arsenal’s defeat to Leicester Citycenter_img Unai Emery now has a worse record than Arsene Wenger in the Premier League (AFP via Getty)More: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man CityAdvertisementAdvertisementWhen asked about having a worse record than Wenger, Emery told Sky Sports: ‘We need time, and we need patience.‘We changed a lot of players, we have young players‘We know we have very demanding and ambitious target, we know we need time and patience. Arsene Wenger’s final stint at Arsenal is better than Emery’s leadership (Sky Sports)‘We are going to achieve with young players and experience players.‘We’ve had circumstances that didn’t help us achieve the best results.‘With patience we are going to do the best we are going to do.’More: Arsenal FCArsenal flop Denis Suarez delivers verdict on Thomas Partey and Lucas Torreira movesThomas Partey debut? Ian Wright picks his Arsenal starting XI vs Manchester CityArsene Wenger explains why Mikel Arteta is ‘lucky’ to be managing Arsenal Advertisementlast_img read more

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Arsenal chief Mikel Arteta plots two transfers after Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang signs new deal

first_img 1/1 Skip Ad Advertisement 1 min. story SPONSORED Rio Ferdinand tells Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop struggling Coming Next Full Screen / Read More About Connatix V67539 Atletico Madrid want over £50m for Partey (Picture: Getty)The Ligue 1 side want over £40m for the 22-year-old, who is keen on a new challenged having spent his entire senior and career at Lyon.Atletico Madrid have demanded over £50m for Partey and Arsenal have already failed in a bid to drive down their asking price by offering Matteo Guendouzi in part exchange.More: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man CityLyon too rejected the chance to sign Guendouzi and Arsenal could be convinced to sell Hector Bellerin, if suitors such as Paris Saint-Germain offer a significant figure for the right-back.Arsenal have had a promising window already with the signings of former Chelsea tracker Willian and Lille centre-back Gabriel.The Brazilian duo shined for Arsenal in their debuts, as the Gunners brushed aside Fulham in their opening game of the Premier League season.MORE: Mikel Arteta and Edu react to Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang signing new Arsenal dealMORE: Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang signs new Arsenal contractFollow Metro Sport across our social channels, on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. For more stories like this, check our sport page. Read More Top articles Video Settings Arteta plots more spending (Picture: Getty)Mikel Arteta plans to sign two midfielders after Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang finally penned a new deal with Arsenal, reports say.The Gabon international ended a long-running transfer saga on Tuesday by signing a three-year deal with Arsenal.Getting Aubameyang to pen a new contract was Arteta’s No.1 priority and now the Arsenal manager can turn his attentions to securing two more top targets.The Mirror claim Arteta plans to follow up the capture of Aubameyang with the addition of two midfielders, with Thomas Partey and Houssem Aouar top of the list.ADVERTISEMENT Comment Advertisement Skip Visit Advertiser website GO TO PAGE PLAY Manchester United captain Harry Maguire Arsenal chief Mikel Arteta plots two transfers after Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang signs new deal by Metro Coral BarryTuesday 15 Sep 2020 5:23 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link11kShares Read More Arteta is aware Arsenal will need to sell before they can make offers for Partey and Aouar and has green lit the exits of Sead Kolasinac, Matteo Guendouzi and Lucas Torreira.AdvertisementAdvertisementThe Gunners will receive a funds boost from the sale of Emiliano Martinez, who is set to join Aston Villa in a deal worth around £20million.Party and Aouar will be costly signings, with the Lyon playmaker’s stock soaring during his side’s Champions League run. Read More Read Morelast_img read more

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BLOG: Detrimental Consequences of the House Republican Stopgap

first_imgBLOG: Detrimental Consequences of the House Republican Stopgap By: Jeffrey Sheridan, Press Secretary Like Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolf December 22, 2015center_img The Blog The letter below was sent from Governor Wolf to lawmakers a short time ago outlining the detrimental consequences the House Republican stopgap budget will have on Pennsylvania.As you know, yesterday, Governor Wolf announced he would veto the House Republican stopgap budget if it reached his desk. He urged everyone to get back to work to pass a full year budget now that invests in education, is balanced and begins to fix the deficit.A stopgap budget does not change the status quo that Harrisburg has accepted for too long. It does not restore funding to our schools, and it does not begin to fix our deficit.Here are some of the consequences of the House Republican stopgap budget:The furlough of 8,000 commonwealth employees with the biggest impact on Corrections and Probation and Parole and the State Police.$455 million cut to our schools, compared to the previous year. This will lead to further program cuts and layoffs.$47.5 million cut to county human service programs$100 million cut to Home and Community Services, denying over 2,150 individuals with disabilities and autism the opportunity to remain in their homes.$8 million cut to vocational rehabilitation, which will lead to the forfeiture of $30 million in federal funding.Letter From the Governor RE: Stopgap by Governor Tom Wolf SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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‘Shabu’ sends man to jail

first_imgHe was detained in the lockup cell ofthe Estancia police station, facing charges for violation of Republic Act 9165,or the Comprehensive Dangerous Drugs Act of 2002./PN Alpasan – resident of the village – wascaught after he sold a sachet of suspected to an undercover officer for P500. ILOILO City – Police arrested a drugsuspect in a buy-bust operation in Barangay Bunaquinia, Estancia, Iloilo. center_img The 21-year-old John Jerome Alpasan wascaught around 9:50 p.m. on Nov. 25., a police report showed. last_img

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Watching the Grandkids

first_imgLast week Sally & I took a trip to Minnesota to see our daughter’s family.  Of course, when you go to see grandchildren these days you must go to see their athletic contests.  That is a highlight!  First we saw Audrey who is 9 years old have her softball practice.  Believe it or not, at this age they are now playing fast-pitch softball.  The girls on the team rotate positions for the most part.  Audrey is a pitcher so she gets a lot of time on the mound.  She is pretty good at pitching, but fielding at the 9-year old level is quite shaky for all of them.  You are never quite sure where the ball will be thrown.Our 4-year old grandson, Andrew, is playing soccer in a 5 and under league.  Playing might not be accurate.  When the ball is put in play, 12-16 young boys all go after it–even the goalie.  Scoring is high, and it is quite fun to watch.  You are never quite sure what the limits of the field are since there were no lines drawn.  Directional kicks do go in all directions.  Since they are 5 and under, their parents are still quite important to them so when they score they run to mom or dad to give them a high five–even while the game is still going on.  My wife says the cutest thing about it is seeing them in their uniforms.last_img read more

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Greco adds confidence to veteran leadership, finds form as second-line forward

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on January 24, 2013 at 12:33 am Contact Jacob: jmklinge@syr.edu | @Jacob_Klinger_ Before the 2007 New York State Under-16 finals, Scott Welch told his Buffalo Bisons the opposing goalie had a short temper. If they could get a chance to poke at the goalie and get under her skin, they should.They succeeded.As the first shift tumbled to a halt in a goalmouth scramble, Jacquie Greco took off from the blue line. With a 30-foot head start, she leveled the netminder. The goalie snapped, chaos followed, the Bisons scored twice on the ensuing 5-on-3 power play and ran out to a 5-2 championship victory.“‘I wanted to make sure I got a good shot in,’” Welch said Greco told him after the game.Though often through less violent means, Welch said Greco has gladly done whatever is asked of her for the team’s sake since he started coaching her as a 12-year-old. Her teammates echoed that sentiment: She’ll do whatever it takes to help Syracuse win.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textWhether it’s scrapping along the boards, manning the defense or playing third- and fourth-line scrap minutes, the Orange’s captain is up for it. She is not an especially skilled player by her own admission, but she sees the ice well and out-muscles and out-skates her opponents.Still, for much of Greco’s four-year career, helping her teammates has meant sitting down and cheering on.Last season, she served as assistant captain and sat out for four or five entire games, according to head coach Paul Flanagan. This year, she’s a full captain, but began the season eating up reserve defenseman minutes. After the loss of star freshman Laurie Kingsbury to a concussion, though, Flanagan shuffled through his utility defenders and forwards – Greco is both – trying to plug the gaping hole on his second forward line.“Pretty much every year he’s threw me up at forward,” Greco said. “I think this year’s a little different because I am a little more confident in myself and I – maybe if our team’s not scoring, there’s my opportunity to be the one to score.”Greco has built on the upbeat leadership that’s transcended her playing time, or lack thereof, and rejuvenated the Orange’s at-times-temperamental attack. She started to heat up before the semester break with a pair of goals in SU’s 4-3 upset of defending College Hockey America champs Robert Morris on Dec. 1, and a go-ahead assist to Allie LaCombe in the second period of an eventual 4-3 loss to then-No. 2 Clarkson on Dec. 8.At the end of the Orange’s game against Colgate on Jan. 8, Greco finally cleaned up a goalmouth scramble to cap SU’s 6-0 win. Freshman forward Melissa Piacentini assisted on the goal. And in the build-up to the team’s road trip to then-No. 7 Mercyhurst, Greco completed Piacentini and Shiann Darkangelo’s forward line.“’Tini’s really quiet but she can get in the corners and she can dig up the puck and she’ll be there in front of the net to put away the goals,” Greco said. “And you know, Shi’s a really good playmaker. If I yell for the puck and I’m open she’ll get it to me, I know she will, and vice-versa.“ … We kind of know that we’re open, we know where to support each other.”Piacentini assisted on Greco’s second-period goal against the Lakers. And watching from the stands at the Mercyhurst Ice Center in Erie, Pa., was Welch.He saw the same flexible, insightful and, when necessary, ruthless player he coached to five state titles from Under-12s to Under-19s.“She’s kind of that rough-and-tumble type of player where there’s no finesse about her,” Welch said. “She’s going to go from point A to point B and if you happen to be in the way she was going to go right through you.”Three days later, with her linemates furious and her team trailing 3-0 at then-No. 4 Cornell, a Darkangelo shot from just under the point bounced off Greco, working the crease, and went in. Small consolation in an 8-1 defeat, but an effort that typified her importance to the Orange as its postseason fate hangs in the balance.Last week, Flanagan reflected on his team’s fleeting ability to let go, play on instinct and create and finish chances in crucial moments.“As an athlete you have that little flash,” Flanagan said. “You got to react to that.”When asked if pestering the crease and scoring accidental goals counted as “being in the flash,” Flanagan smiled, recalling Greco’s goal 19 hours removed from the 8-1 loss.“Sometimes,” he said. “Hey, it’s just a matter of being in the right place at the right time.” Commentscenter_img Related Stories Darkangelo’s hat trick helps send Syracuse to 6-0 win over ColgateWomen’s lacrosse routs Jacksonville; Ice hockey falls at Mercyhurst; Track kicks off in Gotham Cup; Tennis loses at USFSyracuse heads to No. 4 Cornell with confidence in search of marquee winlast_img read more

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