In First PostElection Interview Hillary Ronen Talks Trump and SF Mission

first_imgOn election night, she was a mixture of ecstatic and horrified — she beat her main opponent, Joshua Arce, 57 to 30 percent, but as the results came in it was also clear that Donald Trump would win the presidency. In an interview conducted on Tuesday, Ronen spoke about her thoughts going into local governance under a Trump administration and the host of issues she will face as the new representative of the Mission District, Bernal Heights, and the Portola.This interview has been edited and shortened for print. Hillary Ronen, a former immigrant rights attorney in the Mission District and the legislative aide of Supervisor David Campos, will become his replacement in January when she’s sworn into office after handedly winning her supervisor’s race. 0% Joe Rivano Barros: What do you think about San Francisco governance going forward in the age of Trump and what you as a supervisor will be able to do to ensure that it remains a sanctuary city?Hillary Ronen: I think that the role of local governments is gonna be more important than ever. I think that what we’re not going to see from our federal government — protecting our environment, making sure that healthcare is a right for all Americans, protecting immigrants and valuing their contributions to our country, making sure that there’s quality public education for every single child — all of these issues that we hold dear in San Francisco, we’re not going to be able to look to the federal government during the next four years for progressive action.My role on the Board of Supervisors has become more important than I had imagined. I’m very interested in looking to form relationships with other progressive local officials throughout the country so that as much as possible we can coordinate to come up with responses [to Trump] and introduce those at the same time so that it will be harder for the federal government to stop progressive policies. JRB: Can you talk about your feelings [on election night] and going into your new role with this new federal government? HR: It was a very strange night for so many of us. I never really had an overwhelming feeling of excitement because of the heavy responsibility I felt from the first instant of realizing that our next president would be Donald Trump.On winning the [supervisor’s] race, perhaps what was most satisfying was that my main opponent, Joshua Arce, and to an extent other opponents — their strategy was to attack David Campos and to attack [his] record and history as a supervisor. Having that decisive victory made it clear that the people of District 9 were very happy with David Campos and his record and his work on behalf of the residents of District 9. It was not only a vindication of his work, but also a reflection that the district continues to hold progressive values. JRB: Now there will be no Latinos on the Board of Supervisors, and you’ve been placed in the position of representing the Latino district in the age of Trump. What are your thoughts on that?HR: I take that responsibility very seriously. I’ve been working as both an attorney, organizer, and legislative aide in the main Latino district in San Francisco, so this is not a new role in many ways. What’s really important to me is that I’m not speaking for the Latino community, but that the Latino community speak for itself. I will have Latino representation in my office in terms of a legislative aide, just as it’s a top priority of mine to have an LGBT representative in this office. Not only will we not have a Latino representative on the Board of Supervisors, but it’s possible we will not have an LGBT representative on the Board of Supervisors either, and that’s something I take very seriously.JRB: What do you see as your role as a supervisor in pushing the Police Department to reform, and what should we look forward to in the coming months on police reform?HR: In the coming months we will find out who the mayor is going to appoint as our permanent police chief, and we are going to have an opportunity at the Board of Supervisors to appoint a replacement to the Police Commission for Victor Hwang, who has recently resigned because he has become a judge.That’s going to be the first role that I will play as a supervisor, making sure that someone who is very interested in meaningful and serious police reform is appointed to that position.There are many ways to engage [on police shootings]. One is to hold hearings and bring to light what is happening and use the power of inquiry to make sure that we have continued progress and implementation of the reforms that have been suggested, and when that’s not happening to introduce legislation that forces it to happen.JRB: Yesterday there was a meeting about a memorial on Bernal Hill to commemorate Alex Nieto’s killing. Are you in support of that memorial?HR: I was at the meeting last night and I am 100 percent in support of the memorial. As I said last night at the meeting to Elvira and Refugio Nieto [his parents] I believe that they are an example of what it means to stand up amidst unbelievable heartbreak and fight for justice. Their dignity and their perseverance, it humbles me to the very core. I believe their request to have a memorial for their son, who grew up in Bernal Heights, who grew up on that hill, where he was murdered, is incredibly reasonable to me and something that as a supervisor I am committed to working with and fighting with the Nietos to make that happen.JRB: The progressives have lost their majority on the Board of Supervisors. What do you think about going forward working with moderate supervisors?HR: As I said during the election, there’s not a member of this Board of Supervisors that I don’t think I can work with. While the clear-cut lines of moderates and progressives have shifted again, on single issues, the lines aren’t always so clear. On police reform for example, I’m really looking forward to working with Malia Cohen and London Breed, who when we do the strict divides fall on the moderate side of the line. We’re going to be able to work really well together. I hope that is the case as well on immigrant rights issues, on the environment as well. There will be fights, and hopefully we’ll be able to win hearts and minds with strong arguments and great community campaigns to pass the measures that are really important to us. When we don’t, we can always go to the ballot.JRB: What do you think about the tactic of appealing market-rate housing projects hoping for an eventual delay?HR: I really am hoping to create a new dynamic, where developers come and work with me and my office and the community from the get-go and offer higher levels of affordability to try to stave off the showdowns that we see during these appeals. That’s just a better system all around — it’s better for developers who want predictability, it’s better for the community who have a million other priorities rather than fighting project after project after project.I have made this campaign pledge of building 5,000 units of affordable housing in a decade, and a lot of those units will come through market-rate projects. My interest in seeing market-rate projects built is to see them with as much affordable housing in them as possible.Developers who want to come and work with me towards that common goal, please do so, I can’t wait to work with you. Hopefully the community will be in agreement with that.JRB: There was a sales tax that failed to pass on the November ballot that would have provided funding for homeless and transit services. You’ve said you want to build more navigation centers for the homeless. How do you find the money for that with this budget shortfall?HR: I’m very frustrated, and I’ve also learned a lesson with the sales tax. I was supportive of the sales tax, but seeing how it all went down I think it was a set-up. I will never in the future support a budget that is balanced on a future tax that may or may not pass, especially one that the mayor is going to set up as the solution to all our problems and then do nothing to campaign for its passage. Now it is being used as the excuse for not being able to pass any type of programs.I am going to continue to fight for those navigation centers. I am not going to allow the mayor to pit one service for low-income San Franciscans against another, which is what the mayor is doing right now, pitting homeless services against free City College, against street trees, against guaranteed legal representation for undocumented immigrants, using the sales tax as one excuse. I am going to be fighting for other types of budget cuts.JRB: Finally, what are you most looking forward to in the next four years?HR: I am very much looking forward to finally working on achieving the promises that I’ve been making for a year. I want to start working on building affordable housing, on building navigation centers and removing tent encampments from the Mission, on creating a universal preschool program, on fighting for immigrants, the climate, healthcare, and against a Trump administration that attacks all the values we hold most dear in San Francisco. Share this: FacebookTwitterRedditemail,0%last_img read more

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ROYCE Simmons thought Saints got off to a great st

first_imgROYCE Simmons thought Saints got off to a great start against Castleford but switched off to let their opponents back in.Saints led 18-0 after the first 12 minutes and were coasting until Rangi Chase inspired a Tigers recovery.But a vital Paul Wellens’ try as the half time hooter went was crucial as they ran out 46-26 winners.“I was happy with the start of the game and getting to 18-0,” Simmons said, “but I think we started getting a little bit ahead of ourselves and started worrying about next week.“We got there by playing some good footy but then Cas really began to control the ball and had 15 out of the next 20 sets. We should have been a little more professional and controlled the ball because as we know Castleford can score points.“We were down to just one interchange and ended up with none just after half time. In the end we ground it out and ended up with a win.”He continued: “I thought a number of our players did well; Michael Shenton has been good all year but you expect that from an international. He gets a lot of raps for his attack but he does not get enough for his defence. He played well today as did Tony Puletua.“There were a few stages when we did not have too many troops to put back out on to the field and he took the game by the scruff of the neck. I asked him to lead by example when he was going back out and I thought he did that.”Saints lost Shaun Magennis in the match to a serious looking groin tear whilst Jonny Lomax [head], James Graham [back] and James Roby [hand] also left the field.Robes has also been placed on report for what looked like an alleged spear tackle in the first half.“I haven’t seen it on video and would like to see it,” Simmons continued. “Blake Green did something similar last week and it wasn’t reported and this was very close to that.“He also has the cleanest record in the game so going off last week and his record I would like to think he will be ok.“But Magennis will be out for quite a while. I feel for the bloke – he is one of the most professional we have at the club and has worked so hard to overcome his injuries. He trains hard and has bounced from one injury to another.“James Graham took a bit of a blow around the head and then tightened up in the back and lost the power to his legs. Jonny Lomax had stitches to a cut and James Roby has a hand problem which we will get x-rayed.”Saints’ next match is the Carnegie Challenge Cup Semi Final against Wigan Warriors at the Halliwell Jones stadium on Saturday August 6 at 4.30pm.Tickets are still available and details are here.Simmons said: “We know how much is at stake. The ground is going to be full and there will be a great atmosphere for what will be a great game of footy. That is why I am in the game – I love footy and like competing.“We have worked hard and come through a lot of problems with injury and so on through the year and got ourselves into a semi so we can be proud of what we have done.“But the job is not finished and so we will be going in there with all guns blazing against a side that will have their own guns too.“They are a good side and it should be a great contest.”last_img read more

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JONNY Lomax has thanked the fans after he received

first_imgJONNY Lomax has thanked the fans after he received the Player of the Year award from the Original Saints Supporters Club.The 22-year-old couldn’t be at the ceremony but was delighted with the accolade.“I’d like to thank everyone for the award,” he said. “I am made up and it means a lot that the supporters have backed me. It’s been a tough year and a lot has happened but it’s all to play for in the coming weeks.“Sing loud for us and COME ON YOU SAINTS!”Tickets for tonight’s Qualifying Play Off will be on sale until 3pm from the Saints Ticket Office today.last_img

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WE have received the sad news from Players Assoc

first_imgWE have received the sad news, from Players’ Association Secretary Geoff Pimblett, that former Saints’ wartime player Joe Dewsnip has died in Southport after a long illness.Joe was well into his nineties [93] and considered to be the oldest surviving player with First Team experience.Forceful and athletic, he could play in the centres or on the flanks with equal effectiveness and had a few games at loose forward. He made his debut for the Saints in the centre in the Wartime Emergency League, against Batley at Knowsley Road [12 February 1944] and scored a try in the home team’s 13-8 success. His next match was a 5-21 defeat against Wakefield Trinity, followed by his last game for the Red and Whites, when they were beaten 7-43 at Dewsbury, by Eddie Waring’s team of All Stars.Originally an amateur player in Salford, Joe talked about the wartime situation at Knowsley Road and how difficult it was to get players. There was a general manpower shortage, with men being called up for service in the Armed Forces and twelve hour shifts were the norm for those who worked in industry.Saints were so short of players before one game they actually announced over the tannoy system that if there were any rugby players in the ground, they would get a game!Indeed, Joe also played a few more games for the Saints under various pseudonyms, such as A. Field or AN Other.Joe remained an amateur player at Knowsley Road, but soon after he began to play regularly, he was called up into the Royal Army Medical Corps. He played Rugby Union in the Army [he was once introduced to Lord Montgomery] and later signed with Belle Vue Rangers before hanging up his boots at the age of 34.We send our condolences to his family at this sad time.last_img read more

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Local CNN Hero needs your vote for CNN Hero of the Year

first_imgWILMINGTON, NC (WWAY) — The deadline to vote is December 12th! Bitty and Beau’s Coffee owner Amy Wright has been nominated for the CNN Hero of the Year award and she needs your vote to win.She was named a CNN Hero back in June. The story featured Wright and two employees Matt and Jessie. The segment shows the inspiration that many see every day when walking into the coffee shop. We have featured Wright and her husband as an Extraordinary Person of the Week.- Advertisement – Each of these heroes will receive a $10,000 cash prize. One of the 10 will be named “CNN Hero of the Year” and receive an additional $100,000 for his or her cause.Their efforts are being highlighted at “CNN Heroes: An All-Star Tribute,” a global broadcast event on CNN airing December 17 at 8 p.m. ABC’s Kelly Ripa will join Anderson Cooper as co-host for this star-studded 11th-annual show, live from New York’s American Museum of Natural History.You can vote up to 30 times daily (10 votes by email login, 10 votes by Facebook login, 10 votes by Facebook Messenger).Related Article: Bitty and Beau’s Coffee celebrates third birthdayVOTE HERElast_img read more

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All charges dropped in Pender County deputyinvolved shooting

first_imgPENDER COUNTY, NC (WWAY) — District Attorney Ben David says all charges have been dropped in a shooting that involved a Pender County sheriff’s deputy last month.During a press conference Monday, David explained what led up to deputy firing shots toward a man near Maple Hill on January 17.- Advertisement – David said members of the Sheriff’s Office Vice and Narcotics Unit were patrolling an area of Maple Hill following complaints of drug activity around Webbtown Road. The unit approached a disabled, unoccupied vehicle on the road; nearby was a second vehicle, a Chevrolet Tahoe, with two men inside.Sheriff deputies asked them if they needed assistance. The driver, later identified as Craig T. Pickett, asked if deputies were specifically looking for him. When Detective Justin Barnes answered that they were not, Pickett walked up a nearby driveway. Meanwhile, Captain Nazareth Hankins and Detective Michael Wortman approached the passenger side of the Tahoe and came in contact with another man, later identified as Walter Ray Thompson.Walter Ray Thompson (Photo: PCSO)Officials say Wortman gave Thompson verbal commands to show his hands, at which point Wortman viewed in Thompson’s hand what deputies believed to be a firearm. Hankins also thought that the object in Thompson’s raised hand was a firearm.Related Article: Durham police investigating after man found shot to deathWortman yelled “gun” and fired two shots. He reportedly slipped on wet grass as the gun discharged. One bullet hit the door frame of the Tahoe and the other struck the back passenger window and exited the windshield. Thompson was not hit.Wortman, Barnes, and Hankins approached the Tahoe and viewed what they still believed to be a Glock semi-automatic weapon in Thompson’s lap. Upon securing the object, the officers realized that it was not a firearm, but a flashlight. Thompson was detained.“Wortman believed at that time that if he did not take immediate action, Thompson would shoot him, or another officer on the scene,” said Senior Prosecutor Jason Smith.What deputies believed was a firearm was actually a flashlight. (Photo: DA Office)Meanwhile, Detective Sergeants Ryan Wilson and Kevin Malpass were standing near the disabled vehicle in front of the Tahoe. They heard the gunshots and, at that time, were unclear if Pickett, who was walking up the driveway, had fired the shots. They detained him too.The Pender County Sheriff’s Office immediately began an internal investigation into the incident. The State Bureau of Investigation, which often investigates officer-involved shootings, does not accept investigations in which no one was injured. As a result, we turned to an out-of-county law enforcement agency to review the incident.This investigation was completed by Chief James Crayton of the Wallace Police Department.Officials have dropped Pickett’s original charges that included felonies of maintaining a vehicle for the keeping or selling of a controlled substance, manufacturing marijuana, and possession with intent to sell and deliver marijuana.The D.A. says the search of the vehicle was unconstitutional.“When evidence is illegally obtained or in violation of someone’s fourth amendment rights, that evidence will be suppressed,” said David.Officials have also dropped Thompson’s charges that were with resisting, obstructing or delaying an officer, identity theft, and driving while impaired.“You have to give the benefit of the doubt to Mr. Thompson, just as we do with officers in terms of looking at their actions,” said David. “Mr. Thompson could well be not only presumed innocent under the law, as of course every individual is, but people could look at this and say that he was trying to comply with commands.”Thompson had an outstanding order for his arrest from Onslow County for hit/run leaving the scene of an accident that resulted in property damage.Dante Murphy is the president of the Pender County NAACP. He says even with this outcome, he wants more corrective measures to be taken for everyone involved.“Sometimes, the emotional trauma behind these incidents are worse than being killed. Because you got to live with the fact that a bullet came that close to your head the rest of your life,” said Murphy.last_img read more

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Three arrested in Pender County armed robbery shooting

first_imgAnthony Rasheen Allen, Tyron Markel Allen, Jakell Markese Newton (Photo: Pender Co. Sheriffs Office PENDER COUNTY, NC (WWAY) — Three men faces charges related to an armed robbery that happened last month in the Willard community.On Wednesday night, Pender County deputies and Burgaw police searched a home on Tealbrier Street in Burgaw while investigating the armed robbery. During the armed robbery, one person was shot. Their injuries were non-life threatening.- Advertisement – As a result of the search warrant, three men were arrested.Jakell Markese Newton, 18, is in jail under a $400,000 bond for the following charges:2 counts of robbery with a dangerous weaponassault with a deadly weaponassault with a deadly weapon with intent to killdischarging a firearm into occupied property with serious bodily injuryHe is currently in the Pender County Jail under a $400,000.00 secured bond.Related Article: ‘I’ll take him to my grave’: Family of ‘cold medicine murder’ grieves lossTryon Markel Allen, 18, is in jail under a $250,000 bond for the following charges:robbery with a dangerous weapondischarging a weapon into occupied propertyassault with intent to killAnthony Rasheen Allen, 21, is in jail under a $200,000 bond for the following charges:robbery with a dangerous weaponassault with a deadly weaponIf you have any information, contact the Pender County Sheriff’s Office at (910) 259-1212.last_img read more

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Kentuckys Calipari to return to UNCW as TipOff Dinner speaker

first_img The event is scheduled for Thursday, Sept. 19, at the Burney Center on campus. Ticket information will be announced later. Proceeds for the 7 p.m. dinner will benefit UNCW men’s basketball.“We’re very excited that Coach Calipari is going to speak at our tip-off banquet banquet,” UNCW coach C.B. McGrath said in a news release. “It’s going to be a great event, and we’re thrilled to welcome him back as a former student-athlete. His success as a coach is second to none. What he does off the court to help others is phenomenal. He is extremely generous to help UNCW basketball.”A 2015 inductee into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame, Calipari has coached six teams to the NCAA Final Four, including the 2012 national championship at Kentucky. Forty-nine of his players have been selected in the NBA draft during his 27-year collegiate coaching career.Related Article: Service dog helps put children at ease when visiting the dentistCalipari has made three NCAA Division I coaching stops: UMass, Memphis and UK. In 10 seasons in Lexington, Calipari leads all coaches in total wins (305), NCAA Tournament victories (31), Final Fours (4), Elite Eights (7) and Sweet Sixteens (8).While piling up numerous honors and awards, Calipari’s led the 2011-12 Wildcats to the NCAA national title in his third season as head of Big Blue Nation. He remains one of just two coaches to lead three different programs (UMass-1996, Memphis-2008 and Kentucky-2011, 2012, 2012, 2015) to a Final Four, joining Rick Pitino in the feat.Calipari owns a career coaching record of 708-209 (.772), including a mark of 305-71 (.811) at Kentucky. He has coached teams to 15 conference championships and a 51-17 (.750) NCAA Tournament record.The Sewickley, Pa., native also coached at Kansas (assistant coach, 1983-85), Pittsburgh (assistant coach, 1986-88), UMass (head coach, 1989-96), New Jersey Nets (head coach, 1997-99), Philadelphia 76ers (assistant coach, 200), Memphis (head coach, 2001-09).As a player, Calipari appeared in 25 games in two seasons with the Seahawks in 1978-79 and 1979-80 before transferring to Clarion, Pa. A point guard, he scored 21 points with seven rebounds and 22 assists for the Seahawks. He scored a career-high nine points at Campbell on Jan. 8, 1979.UNCW Men’s Basketball Tip-Off Dinner Speakers2016 – Seth Greenberg, ESPN Analyst2017 – Roy Williams, Head Basketball Coach, University of North Carolina2018 – Brad Brownell, Head Basketball Coach, Clemson University2019 – John Calipari, Head Basketball Coach, University of KentuckyFor more information, contact the Seahawk Club at seahawkclub@uncw.edu. John Calipari (Photo: Photo: Staff Sgt. Scott Raymond / CC BY 2.0) WILMINGTON, NC (WWAY) — Hall of fame basketball coach John Calipari will return to where his college basketball career started when he comes back to Wilmington this fall to speak.UNCW announced that Calipari, currently the head men’s basketball coach at the University of Kentucky, will be the keynote speaker for the 4th Annual Men’s Basketball Tip-Off Dinner. Calipari started his playing career at UNCW in the late 1970s.- Advertisement – last_img read more

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Police appeal for public help in finding wanted man

first_img SharePrint The Police is requesting the public to help in finding a 34-year-old man who resides in Floriana.The police in a statement explained that Clive Agius is wanted by court orders.In their appeal, the police said that anyone with any information can contact the police on 21 224001 or 119.WhatsApp <a href=’http://revive.newsbook.com.mt/www/delivery/ck.php?n=ab2c8853&amp;cb={random}’ target=’_blank’><img src=’https://revive.newsbook.com.mt/www/delivery/avw.php?zoneid=97&amp;cb={random}&amp;n=ab2c8853&amp;ct0={clickurl_enc}’ border=’0′ alt=” /></a>last_img

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Watch Over 500 cars for Malta Drag Racing Association charity event

first_imgMore than €12,500 was collected for the Malta Autism Centre in Mosta during the 16th edition of the Malta Drag Racing Association for Charity event, which was held at the Ħal Far Raceway on Sunday 31st March.Like previous events, this was organised by Mario Mifsud, a local TV presenter and promoter of motorsport, alongside the Association of Drag Racing.Most local clubs joined the organisers, with the result being that there were more than 500 cars on show.Drifting and off-roading clubs also offered rides, against a donation to those that wanted to experience this thrill. A burnout competition was organised for the first time in Malta.Photos: Alex ButtigiegVideo: CrispymediaWhatsApp <a href=’http://revive.newsbook.com.mt/www/delivery/ck.php?n=a7617b59&amp;cb={random}’ target=’_blank’><img src=’https://revive.newsbook.com.mt/www/delivery/avw.php?zoneid=128&amp;cb={random}&amp;n=a7617b59&amp;ct0={clickurl_enc}’ border=’0′ alt=” /></a> SharePrintlast_img read more

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Worlds first smartphone for blind invented in India

first_imgAdvertisement The most obvious question is how does a smartphone work for people who are blind? The answer in layman terms is its innovative “touchscreen” which converts text and pictures into Braille and raised patterns.The smartphone uses Shape Memory Alloy technology, based on the concept that metals remember their original shape–that is, they expand and contract to its original shape after use, according to the Times of India. – Advertisement – The phone’s screen has a grid of pins, which move up and down as per requirement, and the grid has a Braille display, where pins come up to represent a character or letter. The screen itself is capable of elevating and depressing the contents to form patterns in Braille.It’s interesting how as of date, no other major manufacturers have attempted to make a smartphone for the blind, or even smartphones for the challenged or disabled. Could it because there is a lack of demand, or would advertising and marketing be a strain for the companies involved? If companies such as Samsung can design, develop, and implement eye scrolling technology for their mobile devices, how come they have not attempted the Braille conversion technology themselves?Regardless, I personally feel once the prototype, which is currently being developed in conjunction with The Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IIT Delhi), is finalized and reviewed, there will in fact be somewhat of a demand for this smartphone.The market potential is endless, as there is no other device similar at the moment. Furthermore, by targeting this niche group of consumers who so far have been ignored, it’s just another way of bridging the gap between technology and society.Credit: ZDNetlast_img read more

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NSA whistleblower Snowdens email provider is down

first_imgAdvertisement Privacy-focused e-mail service that former-NSA contractor Edward Snowden reportedly used was shut down today after the founder left a note saying he’s gagged from talking about why it’s now offline.The founder of Lavabit, Ladar Levison expressed anguish after having to decide between becoming “complicit in crimes against the American people” or shut down his business nearly 10 years in the making.[related-posts] – Advertisement – Lavabit was founded in 2004 and was dedicated to protecting the privacy of those who used it. The website explained that its initial concerns came from the way Gmail uses people’s data to serve them relevant advertising.Among other efforts to keep user data secure, Lavabit encrypted e-mail before saving them to its servers, which would be attractive to those wishing to send relatively secret communications.Below is the note left on the website.My Fellow Users,I have been forced to make a difficult decision: to become complicit in crimes against the American people or walk away from nearly ten years of hard work by shutting down Lavabit. After significant soul searching, I have decided to suspend operations. I wish that I could legally share with you the events that led to my decision. I cannot. I feel you deserve to know what’s going on–the first amendment is supposed to guarantee me the freedom to speak out in situations like this. Unfortunately, Congress has passed laws that say otherwise. As things currently stand, I cannot share my experiences over the last six weeks, even though I have twice made the appropriate requests.What’s going to happen now? We’ve already started preparing the paperwork needed to continue to fight for the Constitution in the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals. A favorable decision would allow me resurrect Lavabit as an American company.This experience has taught me one very important lesson: without congressional action or a strong judicial precedent, I would _strongly_ recommend against anyone trusting their private data to a company with physical ties to the United States.Sincerely, Ladar Levison Owner and Operator, Lavabit LLCDefending the constitution is expensive! Help us by donating to the Lavabit Legal Defense Fund here.Credit: Venture Beatlast_img read more

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Galaxy Note 4 to feature new side touch for easier selfies

first_imgAdvertisement The upcoming Galaxy Note 4 which is expected to debut during (or before) IFA 2014 in Berlin this September, will have a new “side touch” feature.This will enable users to tap an area on the side rim of the phone to activate the shutter button, making for easier selfies.Why no one has thought of this – with the proliferation of selfies all over the internet – and why someone would think of a long stick for the solution to this problem is beyond us. Good on you, Samsung. – Advertisement – This feature was supposed to debut on the Galaxy S5 but was decided against it on the last moment.Another impending improvement to selfies worldwide is the 3.7MP front-facing camera of the Galaxy Note 4. Usually, Samsung goes with the 2.1MP camera, but this is a definite improvement, allowing users to take selfies in WQHD (2560×1440) resolution.To cap off our camera-centric information about the Galaxy Note 4, we have heard that the main shooter for the device will be a 16MP Sony IMX240 camera sensor with optical image stabilization (OIS), capable of giving us UHD (3840×2160) video at 30FPS.Source: Android Communitylast_img read more

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APO will be the Official Newswire to Cover the Launch of African

first_imgAfrican SABRE Awards. Image Credit: holmesreport.com Advertisement The Holmes Group is partnering with the African Public Relations Association (APRA) to launch its first ever African SABRE Awards. The competition is now open for entries, and the winners will be recognized at a gala dinner during the 2017 APRA conference, which will take place in Marrakesh, Morocco, in May.The SABRE Awards, which recognize Superior Achievement in Branding, Reputation and Engagement, have a 25-year heritage, with separate competitions in North America, EMEA, the Asia-Pacific, Latin America, and South Asia. The winners from those regional competitions are eligible for the Global SABRE Awards, which recognize the best PR campaigns from more than 5,000 entries around the world.In addition, the winners from the African SABREs will be entered automatically into consideration for the EMEA awards, which will continue to include an African category and to accept African entries in all categories. – Advertisement – The Holmes Report and the African Public Relations Association (AFPRA) have announced African Press Organization (APO) to be the official newswire of their first ever African SABRE Awards.“We want to make sure that news about the first African SABRE Awards reaches the entire PR community across Africa, and partnering with APO will help us attract the best work in the region.” Paul Holmes; CEO Holmes Group said in a press statement.African SABRE Awards press releases will be distributed via Africa Wire. As the official newswire, APO will be offering a 50% discount to nominees and winners on all press releases relating to the SABRE competition.APO founder and CEO, Nicolas Pompigne-Mognard, said; “Being selected as the official newswire of the African SABRE Awards is the ultimate benchmark of press release distribution in Africa.”The dedicated SABRE site is now open and accepting entries. The deadline is January 9th, although late entries will be accepted until February 6th with payment of $25 an additional fee. A complete list of categories for the African competition can be found here, with tips for successful entries.Key Dates to note for the SABRE Awards Africa 2017: January 9th, 2017: Early deadline. February 6th, 2017: Late deadline. March – April 2017: Jury review. May 2017: Award ceremony in Marrakesh.source: APO and Holmes Reportlast_img read more

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MTN and Vanu Partner to Increase Connectivity For Rwandans in Rural Areas

first_img(Photo Credit: afidep.org) Advertisement Telecom firm; MTN and Cambridge, Massachusetts-based; software-defined radio technology firm Vanu Inc. have announced the integration of the two networks with an aim to extend MTN’s Network in rural areas which are currently unconnected in Rwanda.The agreement will allow for the provision of GSM services, including voice and data, which were previously inaccessible to several thousand people in rural Rwanda. The agreement will not only benefit existing MTN subscribers, but it creates an opportunity for MTN to grow its customer base.Founded in 1998, Vanu provides solutions that make it possible for people in areas with traditionally poor or no coverage to connect with each other and the outside world. Vanu Rwanda (Local Vanu affiliate) was incorporated in Rwanda in March 2016. – Advertisement – Traditionally, developing mobile networks has required building high-power base stations, requiring significant financial investments. This makes it difficult to justify connecting rural areas, especially in developing economies like Rwanda. Revenue per site is lower due to lower incomes and sparse population, and costs of running the sites are higher due to the need to run diesel on off-grid sites.To overcome the difficulties faced in providing mobile coverage to rural areas, Vanu pioneered a model that cost-effectively addresses these difficulties. The model brings together business and technical innovations of small-scale network architecture, wholesale network operation, and solar power, which ensure that mobile network operators like MTN can service people in rural areas.The alliance between Vanu and MTN will close the digital divide by providing for services that were previously unavailable to the rural population. In addition to voice and data services, the alliance will allow for the provision of mobile money services through MTN Mobile Money which will unlock previously untapped economic opportunities. According to GSMA estimates, a 10% increase in mobile penetration results in a 0.8% increase in annual economic growth.“We are thrilled to be working with MTN Rwanda, the largest telecoms operator in the country on a project which we believe will have a transformative impact on the lives of Rwandans,” says Vanu-Rwanda CEO Anthony Masozera.MTN views the agreement as an enabler to better serve its customers, and as a crucial component of its business mission.“We are committed to providing an improved rural service to all our subscribers,” says MTN Rwanda’s CEO, Bart Hofker, “The agreement with Vanu Rwanda underlines how passionately we feel that someone in a rural area should be able to receive the same level of connectivity as a city-dweller”.Masozera also acknowledged the Rwandan government’s role in supporting Vanu’s successful implementation of the project.“The government recognised that connectivity is crucial to development and that our Rural Coverage as a Service model provides an innovative way to bring coverage to a sizeable population of Rwandans who live in rural areas,” he says. “Government support during our pilot and testing phases laid the groundwork for agreements like the one we have with MTN today”.According to the Director General of RURA, Patrick Nyirishema,“The agreement between Vanu-Rwanda and MTN will help ensure all Rwandans are connected. This is in line with Rwanda’s vision to achieve 100% network coverage, and ensure that by 2020 no Rwandan is left behind. The geography of our country means that doing so using traditional methods can be challenging. This service model enables the provision of world-class connectivity to our people wherever they happen to live in Rwanda”.source: Vanulast_img read more

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Losses only loaned on Frontline

first_imgDon’t Forget Ladies Day This Thursday Flat RaceKillarney 8.40pmTIME: 8.04pm, ATRFRONTLINE TO HIT THE FRONTIt’s not the most obvious event of the day, but may I draw your attention to the final race at Killarney this evening.Frontline is the horse in question. It was smashed off the boards on debut at Punchestown from 25/1 to a starting price of just 4/1.In the end he can only finish seventh but there are sound reasons for thinking losses could be recovered this evening in a much more modest contest.Despite finishing out of the frame, Frontline travelled really well suggesting he is above average and it was only in the final furlong that the lack of an outing showed.The experienced Katie Walsh is in the saddle tonight and whilst backing failed gambles next time out can be the road to the poorhouse, an exception can be made for Frontline tonight who looks a solid bet. STAR FORECAST(stake between 0.5 and 10 points)8 point win FRONTLINE (8.40 Killarney)(-8 points Sunday)last_img read more

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STARTERS ORDERS Sunday

first_imgHORSE RACING1.20 ThurlesJetez 2/1 > 10/111.55 ChelmsfordFrozen Lake 12/1 > 6/13.25 ChelmsfordSean O’Casey 9/1 > 5/1LIVE FOOTBALLScottish FA Cup 4th Round14:05 Sky Sports Football / Sky Sports Main Event15/8 Hearts 29/20 Hibernian 11/5 DRAWPremier League16:00 Sky Sports Premier League / Sky Sports Main Event / Sky Sports Ultra HD9/2 Southampton 4/6 Tottenham Hotspur 31/10 DRAW BET WITH STAR SPORTS 08000 521 321 [dropcap]W[/dropcap]elcome to Starters Orders. Our daily midday update from the trading room at Star Sports with our key market movers for the day across all sports.Sunday 21 Januarylast_img

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Material adapts to strain

first_imgShareCONTACT: Mike WilliamsPHONE: 713-348-6728EMAIL: mikewilliams@rice.eduMaterial adapts to strainRice University lab creates self-strengthening nanocomposite Researchers at Rice University have created a synthetic material that gets stronger from repeated stress much like the body strengthens bones and muscles after repeated workouts.Work by the Rice lab of Pulickel Ajayan, professor in mechanical engineering and materials science and of chemistry, shows the potential of stiffening polymer-based nanocomposites with carbon nanotube fillers. The team reported its discovery this month in the journal ACS Nano. The trick, it seems, lies in the complex, dynamic interface between nanostructures and polymers in carefully engineered nanocomposite materials.Brent Carey, a graduate student in Ajayan’s lab, found the interesting property while testing the high-cycle fatigue properties of a composite he made by infiltrating a forest of vertically aligned, multiwalled nanotubes with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), an inert, rubbery polymer. To his great surprise, repeatedly loading the material didn’t seem to damage it at all. In fact, the stress made it stiffer.Carey, whose research is sponsored by a NASA fellowship, used dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) to test their material. He found that after an astounding 3.5 million compressions (five per second) over about a week’s time, the stiffness of the composite had increased by 12 percent and showed the potential for even further improvement.“It took a bit of tweaking to get the instrument to do this,” Carey said. “DMA generally assumes that your material isn’t changing in any permanent way. In the early tests, the software kept telling me, ‘I’ve damaged the sample!’ as the stiffness increased. I also had to trick it with an unsolvable program loop to achieve the high number of cycles.”Materials scientists know that metals can strain-harden during repeated deformation, a result of the creation and jamming of defects — known as dislocations — in their crystalline lattice. Polymers, which are made of long, repeating chains of atoms, don’t behave the same way.The team is not sure precisely why their synthetic material behaves as it does. “We were able to rule out further cross-linking in the polymer as an explanation,” Carey said. “The data shows that there’s very little chemical interaction, if any, between the polymer and the nanotubes, and it seems that this fluid interface is evolving during stressing.”“The use of nanomaterials as a filler increases this interfacial area tremendously for the same amount of filler material added,” Ajayan said. “Hence, the resulting interfacial effects are amplified as compared with conventional composites.“For engineered materials, people would love to have a composite like this,” he said. “This work shows how nanomaterials in composites can be creatively used.”They also found one other truth about this unique phenomenon: Simply compressing the material didn’t change its properties; only dynamic stress — deforming it again and again — made it stiffer. Carey drew an analogy between their material and bones. “As long as you’re regularly stressing a bone in the body, it will remain strong,” he said. “For example, the bones in the racket arm of a tennis player are denser. Essentially, this is an adaptive effect our body uses to withstand the loads applied to it.“Our material is similar in the sense that a static load on our composite doesn’t cause a change. You have to dynamically stress it in order to improve it.” Cartilage may be a better comparison — and possibly even a future candidate for nanocomposite replacement. “We can envision this response being attractive for developing artificial cartilage that can respond to the forces being applied to it but remains pliable in areas that are not being stressed,” Carey said. Both researchers noted this is the kind of basic research that asks more questions than it answers. While they can easily measure the material’s bulk properties, it’s an entirely different story to understand how the polymer and nanotubes interact at the nanoscale.“People have been trying to address the question of how the polymer layer around a nanoparticle behaves,” Ajayan said. “It’s a very complicated problem. But fundamentally, it’s important if you’re an engineer of nanocomposites. “From that perspective, I think this is a beautiful result. It tells us that it’s feasible to engineer interfaces that make the material do unconventional things.”Co-authors of the paper are former Rice postdoctoral researcher Lijie Ci; Prabir Patra, assistant professor of mechanical engineering at the University of Bridgeport; and Glaura Goulart Silva, associate professor at the Federal University of Minas Gerais, Brazil.Rice University and the NASA Graduate Student Researchers Program funded the research.@font-face {font-family: “Times New Roman”;}@font-face {font-family: “TimesNewRomanPSMT”;}p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal { margin: 0in 0in 0.0001pt; font-size: 14pt; font-family: Helvetica; }a:link, span.MsoHyperlink { color: blue; text-decoration: underline; }a:visited, span.MsoHyperlinkFollowed { color: purple; text-decoration: underline; }table.MsoNormalTable { font-size: 10pt; font-family: “Times New Roman”; }div.Section1 { page: Section1; }Read the abstract at http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/nn103104gArtwork is available for download at http://media.rice.edu/images/media/NewsRels/0323_cut_composite2.jpghttp://www.media.rice.edu/images/media/NEWSRELS/0323_carey.jpgCAPTIONS:(Material)A small block of nanocomposite material proved its ability to stiffen under strain at a Rice University laboratory. (Credit Ajayan Lab/Rice University)(Researcher)Rice University graduate student Brent Carey positions a piece of nanocomposite material in the dynamic mechanical analysis device. He used the device to compress the material 3.5 million times over about a week, proving that the nanocomposite stiffens under strain. The research is the subject of a new paper in the journal ACS Nano.(Credit Jeff Fitlow/Rice University) AddThislast_img read more

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Lack of energy an enemy to antibioticresistant microbes

first_imghttp://news.rice.edu/files/2013/02/0211-ANTIBIOTIC-1.jpgAs a bacteria cell’s metabolic burden rises due to lack of nutrients or oxygen, its ability to transfer antibiotic-resistant genes to new generations declines. Rice University researchers were able to eliminate tetracycline resistance genes from a strain of bacteria found in the environment. (Credit: Alvarez Group/Rice University)Located on a 300-acre forested campus in Houston, Rice University is consistently ranked among the nation’s top 20 universities by U.S. News & World Report. Rice has highly respected schools of Architecture, Business, Continuing Studies, Engineering, Humanities, Music, Natural Sciences and Social Sciences and is home to the Baker Institute for Public Policy. With 3,708 undergraduates and 2,374 graduate students, Rice’s undergraduate student-to-faculty ratio is 6-to-1. Its residential college system builds close-knit communities and lifelong friendships, just one reason why Rice has been ranked No. 1 for best quality of life multiple times by the Princeton Review and No. 2 for “best value” among private universities by Kiplinger’s Personal Finance. To read “What they’re saying about Rice,” go to http://tinyurl.com/AboutRiceU.  Share3David Ruth713-348-6327david@rice.eduMike Williams713-348-6728mikewilliams@rice.eduLack of energy an enemy to antibiotic-resistant microbesRice University engineers seek strategy to control resistant genes in the environmentHOUSTON – (Feb. 11, 2013) – Rice University researchers “cured” a strain of bacteria of its ability to resist an antibiotic in an experiment that has implications for a long-standing public health crisis.Rice environmental engineer Pedro Alvarez and his team managed to remove the ability of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa microorganism to resist the antibiotic medication tetracycline by limiting its access to food and oxygen.Over 120 generations, the starving bacteria chose to conserve valuable energy rather than use it to pass on the plasmid – a small and often transmissible DNA element – that allows it to resist tetracycline.The researchers’ results, reported this month in the American Chemical Society journal Environmental Science and Technology, are the latest in a long effort to understand the environmental aspects of antibiotic resistance, which threatens decades of progress in fighting disease.“The propagation of antibiotic resistance has been perceived as a medical or microbiology-related problem,” Alvarez said. “And it truly is a serious problem. But what many people miss is that it is also an environmental pollution problem. A lot of the antibiotic-resistant bacteria originate in animal agriculture, where there is overuse, misuse and abuse of antibiotics.”Alvarez contended that confined animal feeding operations (CAFOs) are potential sources of environmental contamination by antibiotics and the associated antibiotic-resistant genes that find their way into the ground, water and ultimately the food supply.“We started with the hypothesis that microbes don’t like to carry excess baggage,” he said. “That means they will drop genes they’re not using because there is a metabolic burden, a high energy cost, to keeping them.”The Rice researchers tested their theory on two strains of bacteria, P. aeruginosa, which is found in soil, and E. coli, which carries resistant genes directly from animals through their feces into the environment.By slowly starving them of nutrients and/or oxygen through successive generations, they found that in the absence of tetracycline, both microbes dumped the resistance plasmid, though not entirely in the case of E. coli. But P. aeruginosa completely shed the genetic element responsible for resistance, which made it susceptible once again to antibiotics. When a high level of tetracycline was present, both microbes retained a level of resistance.One long-recognized problem with antibiotics is that they tend to snatch defeat from the jaws of victory. If any antibiotic-resistant bacteria are part of a biological mix, whether in a person, an animal or in the environment, the weak microbes will die and the resistant will survive and propagate; this process is known by biologists as “selective pressure.”So there is incentive to eliminate the resistance plasmid from bacteria in the environment as close to the source as possible. The experiments point to possible remediation strategies, Alvarez said. “There are practical implications to what we did,” he said. “If we can put an anaerobic barrier at the point where a lagoon drains into the environment, we will essentially exert selective pressure for the loss of antibiotic-resistant genes and mitigate the propagation of these factors.”An anaerobic barrier may be as cheap and simple as mulch in the drainage channel, he said. “If you have a CAFO draining through a channel, then put an anaerobic barrier in that channel. A mulch barrier will do.” He said a mulch barrier only a meter thick could contact slow-moving groundwater for more than a month. “That may not kill the bacteria, but it’s enough to have bacteria notice a deficiency in their ability to obtain energy from the environment and feel the stress to dump resistant genes.”Alvarez has been chipping away at the problem since moving to Rice from the University of Iowa in 2004, even without American funding for research. His study of the Haihe River in China, funded by the Chinese government and published last year, found tetracycline resistance genes are common in the environment there as well. “We tested water and river sediment and couldn’t find a sample that didn’t have them,” he said.“Our philosophy in environmental engineering is that an ounce of prevention is worth more than a pound of remediation,” Alvarez said. “Prevention here is, basically, don’t let these genes proliferate. Don’t let them amplify in the environment. Stop them before they’re released. And one easy way is to put up an anaerobic barrier.”Co-authors of the paper are Rice alumni Michal Rysz, now an environmental engineer at GSI Environmental Inc., Houston; William Mansfield, a scientist at the EPA in Dallas; and John Fortner, an assistant professor at Washington University, St. Louis. Alvarez is the George R. Brown Professor and chair of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Rice.-30-Read the abstract at http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/es3035329Follow Rice News and Media Relations via Twitter @RiceUNewsRelated Materials:Alvarez Group: http://alvarez.rice.eduTrends in Antibiotic Resistance Genes Occurrence in the Haihe River, China:http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/es100233wCenters for Disease Control and Prevention: http://www.cdc.gov/drugresistance/index.htmlImage for download: AddThislast_img read more

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Kolditz available to discuss Gore visit to Rice

first_imgShareMEDIA ADVISORYDavid Ruth713-348-6327david@rice.eduKolditz available to discuss Gore visit to RiceHOUSTON — (Oct. 20, 2017) – Tom Kolditz, founding director of Rice University’s Doerr Institute for New Leaders, is available to discuss Doerr Institute board member Al Gore’s visit to Rice Monday.The former vice president will speak at Rice’s Tudor Fieldhouse at 6:30 p.m. Oct. 23. Gore, who is chairman of the Climate Reality Project, will present “The Climate Crisis and Extreme Weather.”The Doerr Institute is the country’s first one-on-one leadership development program offered free to all students and is the only leadership institute that provides individualized coaching and actionable guidance from certified coaches for college students.“As an advocate on such issues as climate change, Gore is a great example of leadership in action,” Kolditz said.Kolditz can discuss the institute’s philosophy of leadership development and his approach to a developmental program that coaches students on how to lead without formal authority.To interview Kolditz or to RSVP for the Gore event, media should contact David Ruth, director of national media relations at Rice, at david@rice.edu or 713-348-6327.Kolditz short biography.Prior to Rice, Kolditz taught as a professor in the practice of leadership and management and director of the Leadership Development Program at the Yale School of Management.A retired brigadier general, Kolditz led the Department of Behavioral Sciences and Leadership at West Point for 12 years. In that role, he was responsible for West Point’s teaching, research and outreach activities in management, leader development science, psychology and sociology and was titled professor emeritus after retirement. His career has focused on either leading organizations himself or studying leadership and leadership policy across sectors. He served for two years as a leadership and human resources policy analyst in the Pentagon and for a year as a concept developer in the Center for Army Leadership and was the founding director of the West Point Leadership Center. He was instrumental in the design and formation of the Thayer Leader Development Group and is the managing member of Saxon Castle LLC, a leader development consultancy. Kolditz is a recipient of the Distinguished Service Medal, the Army’s second-highest award in order of precedence and was recently bestowed the Warren Bennis award.Kolditz holds a bachelor’s degree in psychology and sociology from Vanderbilt University, three master’s degrees and a Ph.D. in psychology from the University of Missouri.-30-Image for download:Tom Kolditz photo courtesy Rice Universityhttp://news.rice.edu/files/2016/08/Tom-Kolditz-Resized-sniof4.jpgFollow Rice News and Media Relations on Twitter @RiceUNews.Located on a 300-acre forested campus in Houston, Rice University is consistently ranked among the nation’s top 20 universities by U.S. News & World Report. Rice has highly respected schools of Architecture, Business, Continuing Studies, Engineering, Humanities, Music, Natural Sciences and Social Sciences and is home to the Baker Institute for Public Policy. With 3,879 undergraduates and 2,861 graduate students, Rice’s undergraduate student-to-faculty ratio is 6-to-1. Its residential college system builds close-knit communities and lifelong friendships, just one reason why Rice is ranked No. 1 for quality of life and for lots of race/class interaction and No. 2 for happiest students by the Princeton Review. Rice is also rated as a best value among private universities by Kiplinger’s Personal Finance. To read “What they’re saying about Rice,” go to http://tinyurl.com/RiceUniversityoverview. AddThislast_img read more

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